• Feedback in the form of mass outflows driven by star formation or active galactic nuclei is a key component of galaxy evolution. The luminous infrared galaxy Zw 049.057 harbours a compact obscured nucleus with a possible far-IR signature of outflowing molecular gas. Due to the high optical depths at far-IR wavelengths, the interpretation of the outflow signature is uncertain. At mm and radio wavelengths, the radiation is better able to penetrate the large columns of gas and dust. We used high resolution observations from the SMA, ALMA, and the VLA to image the CO 2-1 and 6-5 emission, the 690 GHz continuum, the radio cm continuum, and absorptions by rotationally excited OH. The CO line profiles exhibit wings extending 300 km/s beyond the systemic velocity. At cm wavelengths, we find a compact (40 pc) continuum component in the nucleus, with weaker emission extending several 100 pc approximately along the major and minor axes of the galaxy. In the OH absorption lines toward the compact continuum, wings extending to a similar velocity as for the CO are seen on the blue side of the profile. The weak cm continuum emission along the minor axis is aligned with a highly collimated, jet-like dust feature previously seen in near-IR images of the galaxy. Comparison of the apparent optical depths in the OH lines indicate that the excitation conditions in Zw 049.057 differ from those in other OH megamaser galaxies. We interpret the wings in the spectral lines as signatures of a molecular outflow. A relation between this outflow and the minor axis radio feature is possible, although further studies are required to investigate this possible association and understand the connection between the outflow and the nuclear activity. Finally, we suggest that the differing OH excitation conditions are further evidence that Zw 049.057 is in a transition phase between megamaser and kilomaser activity.
  • The classical Johnson-Mehl-Avrami-Kolmogorov approach for nucleation and growth models of diffusive phase transitions is revisited and applied to model the growth of ferrite in multiphase steels. For the prediction of mechanical properties of such steels, a deeper knowledge of the grain structure is essential. To this end, a Fokker-Planck evolution law for the volume distribution of ferrite grains is developed and shown to exhibit a log-normally distributed solution. Numerical parameter studies are given and confirm expected properties qualitatively. As a preparation for future work on parameter identification, a strategy is presented for the comparison of volume distributions with area distributions experimentally gained from polished micrograph sections.
  • Extragalactic observations of water emission can provide valuable insights into the excitation of the interstellar medium. In addition, extragalactic megamasers are powerful probes of kinematics close to active nuclei. Therefore, it is paramount to determine the true origin of the water emission, whether it is excited by processes close to an AGN or in star-forming regions. We use ALMA Band 5 science verification observations to analyse the emission of the 183 GHz water line in Arp 220 on sub-arcsecond scales, in conjunction with new ALMA Band 7 data at 325 GHz. Specifically, the nature of the process leading to the excitation of emission at these water lines is studied in this context. Supplementary 22 GHz VLA observations are used to better constrain the parameter space in the excitation modelling of the water lines. We detect 183 GHz H2O and 325 GHz water emission towards the two compact nuclei at the center of Arp 220, being brighter in Arp 220 West. The emission at these two frequencies is compared to previous single-dish data and does not show evidence of variability. The 183 and 325 GHz lines show similar spectra and kinematics, but the 22 GHz profile is significantly different in both nuclei due to a blend with an NH3 absorption line. Our findings suggest that the most likely scenario to cause the observed water emission in Arp 220 is a large number of independent masers originating from numerous star-forming regions.
  • High resolution submm observations are important in probing the morphology, column density and dynamics of obscured active galactic nuclei (AGNs). With high resolution (0.06 x 0.05) ALMA 690 GHz observations we have found bright (TB >80 K) and compact (FWHM 10x7 pc) CO 6-5 line emission in the nucleus of the extremely radio-quiet galaxy NGC1377. The integrated CO 6-5 intensity is aligned with the previously discovered jet/outflow of NGC1377 and is tracing the dense (n>1e4 cm-3), hot gas at the base of the outflow. The velocity structure is complex and shifts across the jet/outflow are discussed in terms of jet-rotation or separate, overlapping kinematical components. High velocity gas (deltaV +-145 km/s) is detected inside r<2-3 pc and we suggest that it is emerging from an inclined rotating disk or torus of position angle PA=140+-20 deg with a dynamical mass of approx 3e6 Msun. This mass is consistent with that of a supermassive black hole (SMBH), as inferred from the M-sigma relation. The gas mass of the proposed disk/torus constitutes <3% of the nuclear dynamical mass. In contrast to the intense CO 6-5 line emission, we do not detect dust continuum with an upper limit of S(690GHz)<2mJy. The corresponding, 5 pc, H2 column density is estimated to N(H2)<3e23 cm-2, which is inconsistent with a Compton Thick (CT) source. We discuss the possibility that CT obscuration may be occuring on small (subparsec) or larger scales. From SED fitting we suggest that half of the IR emission of NGC1377 is nuclear and the rest (mostly the far-infrared (FIR)) is more extended. The extreme radio quietness, and the lack of emission from other star formation tracers, raise questions on the origin of the FIR emission. We discuss the possibility that it is arising from the dissipation of shocks in the molecular jet/outflow or from irradiation by the nuclear source along the poles.
  • We present new ALMA Band 7 ($\sim340$ GHz) observations of the dense gas tracers HCN, HCO$^+$, and CS in the local, single-nucleus, ultraluminous infrared galaxy IRAS 13120-5453. We find centrally enhanced HCN (4-3) emission, relative to HCO$^+$ (4-3), but do not find evidence for radiative pumping of HCN. Considering the size of the starburst (0.5 kpc) and the estimated supernovae rate of $\sim1.2$ yr$^{-1}$, the high HCN/HCO$^+$ ratio can be explained by an enhanced HCN abundance as a result of mechanical heating by the supernovae, though the active galactic nucleus and winds may also contribute additional mechanical heating. The starburst size implies a high $\Sigma_{IR}$ of $4.7\times10^{12}$ $L_{\odot}$ kpc$^{-2}$, slightly below predictions of radiation-pressure limited starbursts. The HCN line profile has low-level wings, which we tentatively interpret as evidence for outflowing dense molecular gas. However, the dense molecular outflow seen in the HCN line wings is unlikely to escape the galaxy and is destined to return to the nucleus and fuel future star formation. We also present modeling of Herschel observations of the H$_2$O lines and find a nuclear dust temperature of $\sim40$ K. IRAS 13120-5453 has a lower dust temperature and $\Sigma_{IR}$ than is inferred for the systems termed "compact obscured nuclei" (such as Arp 220 and Mrk 231). If IRAS 13120-5453 has undergone a compact obscured nucleus phase, we are likely witnessing it at a time when the feedback has already inflated the nuclear ISM and diluted star formation in the starburst/AGN core.
  • With high resolution (0."25 x 0."18) ALMA CO 3-2 observations of the nearby (D=21 Mpc, 1"=102 pc), extremely radio-quiet galaxy NGC1377, we have discovered a high-velocity, very collimated nuclear outflow which we interpret as a molecular jet with a projected length of +-150 pc. Along the jet axis we find strong velocity reversals where the projected velocity swings from -150 km/s to +150 km/s. A simple model of a molecular jet precessing around an axis close to the plane of the sky can reproduce the observations. The velocity of the outflowing gas is difficult to constrain due to the velocity reversals but we estimate it to be between 240 and 850 km/s and the jet to precess with a period P=0.3-1.1 Myr. The CO emission is clumpy along the jet and the total molecular mass in the high-velocity (+-(60 to 150 km/s)) gas lies between 2e6 Msun (light jet) and 2e7 Msun (massive jet). There is also CO emission extending along the minor axis of NGC1377. It holds >40% of the flux in NGC1377 and may be a slower, wide-angle molecular outflow which is partially entrained by the molecular jet. We discuss the driving mechanism of the molecular jet and suggest that it is either powered by a very faint radio jet or by an accretion disk-wind similar to those found towards protostars. The nucleus of NGC1377 harbours intense embedded activity and we detect emission from vibrationally excited HCN J=4-3 v_2=1f which is consistent with hot gas and dust. We find large columns of H2 in the centre of NGC1377 which may be a sign of a high rate of recent gas infall. The dynamical age of the molecular jet is short (<1 Myr), which could imply that it is young and consistent with the notion that NGC1377 is caught in a transient phase of its evolution. However, further studies are required to determine the age of the molecular jet, its mass and the role it is playing in the growth of the nucleus of NGC1377.
  • We demonstrated a frequency offset locking between two laser sources using a waveguide-type electro-optic modulator (EOM) with 10th-order sidebands for magneto-optical trapping of Fr atoms. The frequency locking error signal was successfully obtained by performing delayed self-homodyne detection of the beat signal between the repumping frequency and the 10th-order sideband component of the trapping light. Sweeping the trapping-light and repumping-light frequencies with keeping its frequency difference of 46 GHz was confirmed over 1 GHz by monitoring the Doppler absorption profile of I2. This technique enables us to search for a resonance frequency of magneto-optical trapping of Fr.
  • We explore the potential of imaging vibrationally excited molecular emission at high angular resolution to better understand the morphology and physical structure of the dense gas in Arp~220 and to gain insight into the nature of the nuclear powering sources. Vibrationally excited emission of HCN is detected in both nuclei with a very high ratio relative to the total $L_{FIR}$, higher than in any other observed galaxy and well above what is observed in Galactic hot cores. HCN $v_2=1f$ is observed to be marginally resolved in $\sim60\times50$~pc regions inside the dusty $\sim100$~pc sized nuclear cores. Its emission is centered on our derived individual nuclear velocities based on HCO$^+$ emission ($V_{WN}=5342\pm4$ and $V_{EN}=5454\pm8$~\kms, for the western and eastern nucleus, respectively). With virial masses within $r\sim25-30$~pc based on the HCN~$v_2=1f$ line widths, we estimate gas surface densities (gas fraction $f_g=0.1$) of $3\pm0.3\times10^4~M_\odot~\rm pc^{-2}$ (WN) and $1.1\pm0.1\times10^4~M_\odot~\rm pc^{-2}$ (EN). The $4-3/3-2$ flux density ratio could be consistent with optically thick emission, which would further constrain the size of the emitting region to $>15$~pc (EN) and $>22$~pc (WN). The absorption systems that may hide up to $70\%$ of the HCN and HCO$^+$ emission are found at velocities of $-50$~\kms~(EN) and $6$, $-140$, and $-575$~\kms (WN) relative to velocities of the nuclei. Blueshifted absorptions are the evidence of outflowing motions from both nuclei. The bright vibrational emission implies the existence of a hot dust region radiatively pumping these transitions. We find evidence of a strong temperature gradient that would be responsible for both the HCN $v_2$ pumping and the absorbed profiles from the vibrational ground state as a result of both continuum and self-absorption by cooler foreground gas.
  • We present high resolution (0."4) IRAM PdBI and ALMA mm and submm observations of the (ultra) luminous infrared galaxies ((U)LIRGs) IRAS17208-0014, Arp220, IC860 and Zw049.057 that reveal intense line emission from vibrationally excited ($\nu_2$=1) J=3-2 and 4-3 HCN. The emission is emerging from buried, compact (r<17-70 pc) nuclei that have very high implied mid-infrared surface brightness $>$$5\times 10^{13}$ L$_{\odot}$ kpc$^{-2}$. These nuclei are likely powered by accreting supermassive black holes (SMBHs) and/or hot (>200 K) extreme starbursts. Vibrational, $\nu_2$=1, lines of HCN are excited by intense 14 micron mid-infrared emission and are excellent probes of the dynamics, masses, and physical conditions of (U)LIRG nuclei when H$_2$ column densities exceed $10^{24}$ cm$^{-2}$. It is clear that these lines open up a new interesting avenue to gain access to the most obscured AGNs and starbursts. Vibrationally excited HCN acts as a proxy for the absorbed mid-infrared emission from the embedded nuclei, which allows for reconstruction of the intrinsic, hotter dust SED. In contrast, we show strong evidence that the ground vibrational state ($\nu$=0), J=3-2 and 4-3 rotational lines of HCN and HCO$^+$ fail to probe the highly enshrouded, compact nuclear regions owing to strong self- and continuum absorption. The HCN and HCO$^+$ line profiles are double-peaked because of the absorption and show evidence of non-circular motions - possibly in the form of in- or outflows. Detections of vibrationally excited HCN in external galaxies are so far limited to ULIRGs and early-type spiral LIRGs, and we discuss possible causes for this. We tentatively suggest that the peak of vibrationally excited HCN emission is connected to a rapid stage of nuclear growth, before the phase of strong feedback.
  • We use high (0."65 x 0."52,(65x52pc)) resolution SubMillimeter Array (SMA) observations to image the CO and 13CO 2-1 line emission of the extreme FIR-excess galaxy NGC 1377. We find bright, complex CO 2-1 line emission in the inner 400 pc of the galaxy. The CO 2-1 line has wings that are tracing a kinematical component which appears perpendicular to that of the line core. Together with an intriguing X-shape of the integrated intensity and dispersion maps, this suggests that the molecular emission of NGC 1377 consists of a disk-outflow system. Lower limits to the molecular mass and outflow rate are M_out(H2)>1e7 Msun and dM/dt>8 Msun/yr. The age of the proposed outflow is estimated to 1.4Myrs, the extent to 200pc and the outflow speed to 140 km/s. The total molecular mass in the SMA map is estimated to M_tot(H2)=1.5e8 Msun (on a scale of 400 pc) while in the inner r=29 pc the molecular mass is M_core(H2)=1.7e7 Msun with a corresponding H2 column density of N(H2)=3.4e23 cm-2 and an average CO 2-1 brightness temperature of 19K. Observing the molecular properties of the FIR-excess galaxy NGC 1377 allows us to probe the early stages of nuclear activity and the onset of feedback in active galaxies. The age of the outflow supports the notion that the current nuclear activity is young - a few Myrs. The outflow may be powered by radiation pressure from a compact, dust enshrouded nucleus, but other driving mechanisms are possible. The buried source may be an AGN or an extremely young (1Myr) compact starburst. Limitations on size and mass lead us to favour the AGN scenario, but further studies are required to settle the issue. In either case, the wind with its implied mass outflow rate will quench the nuclear power source within a very short time of 5-25 Myrs. It is however possible that the gas is unable to escape the galaxy and may eventually fall back onto NGC 1377 again.
  • We report on atomic gas (HI) and molecular gas (as traced by CO(2-1)) redshifted absorption features toward the nuclear regions of the closest powerful radio galaxy, Centaurus A (NGC 5128). Our HI observations using the Very Long Baseline Array allow us to discern with unprecedented sub-parsec resolution HI absorption profiles toward different positions along the 21 cm continuum jet emission in the inner 0."3 (or 5.4 pc). In addition, our CO(2-1) data obtained with the Submillimeter Array probe the bulk of the absorbing molecular gas with little contamination by emission, not possible with previous CO single-dish observations. We shed light with these data on the physical properties of the gas in the line of sight, emphasizing the still open debate about the nature of the gas that produces the broad absorption line (~55 km/s). First, the broad H I line is more prominent toward the central and brightest 21 cm continuum component than toward a region along the jet at a distance ~ 20 mas (or 0.4 pc) further from it. This suggests that the broad absorption line arises from gas located close to the nucleus, rather than from diffuse and more distant gas. Second, the different velocity components detected in the CO(2-1) absorption spectrum match well other molecular lines, such as those of HCO+(1-0), except the broad absorption line that is detected in HCO+(1-0) (and most likely related to that of the H I). Dissociation of molecular hydrogen due to the AGN seems to be efficient at distances <= 10 pc, which might contribute to the depth of the broad H I and molecular lines.
  • We present high resolution (0."4) observations of HNC J=3-2 with the SubMillimeter Array (SMA). We find luminous HNC 3-2 line emission in the western part of Arp220, centered on the western nucleus, while the eastern side of the merger shows relatively faint emission. A bright (36 K), narrow (60 km/s) emission feature emerges from the western nucleus, superposed on a broader spectral component. A possible explanation is weak maser emission through line-of-sight amplification of the background continuum source. There is also a more extended HNC 3-2 emission feature north and south of the nucleus. This feature resembles the bipolar OH maser morphology around the western nucleus. Substantial HNC abundances are required to explain the bright line emission from this warm environment. We discuss this briefly in the context of an X-ray chemistry and radiative excitation. We conclude that the luminous and possibly amplified HNC emission of the western nucleus of the Arp220 merger reflects the unusual, and perhaps transient, environment of the starburst/AGN activity there. The faint HNC line emission towards Arp220-east reveals a real difference in physical conditions between the two merger nuclei.
  • The electronic structures of the Heusler type compounds Fe$_{3-x}V$_x$Si in the concentration range between x = 0 and x = 1 have been probed by photoemission spectroscopy (PES). The observed shift of Si 2p core- level and the main valence band structres indicate a chemical potential shift to higher energy with increasing x. It is also clarified that the density of state at Fermi edge is owing to the collaboration of V 3d and Fe 3d derived states. Besides the decrease of the spectral intensity near Fermi edge with increasing x suggests the formation of pseudo gap at large x.
  • We present Submillimeter Array observations of the z=3.91 gravitationally lensed broad absorption line quasar APM08279+5255 which spatially resolve the 1.0mm (0.2mm rest-frame) dust continuum emission. At 0.4" resolution, the emission is separated into two components, a stronger, extended one to the northeast (46+/-5mJy) and a weaker, compact one to the southwest (15+/-2mJy). We have carried out simulations of the gravitational lensing effect responsible for the two submm components in order to constrain the intrinsic size of the submm continuum emission. Using an elliptical lens potential, the best fit lensing model yields an intrinsic (projected) diameter of ~80pc, which is not as compact as the optical/near-infrared (NIR) emission and agrees with previous size estimates of the gas and dust emission in APM08279+5255. Based on our estimate, we favor a scenario in which the 0.2mm (rest-frame) emission originates from a warm dust component (T_d=150-220K) that is mainly heated by the AGN rather than by a starburst (SB). The flux is boosted by a factor of ~90 in our model, consistent with recent estimates for APM08279+5255.
  • Phase closure at 682 GHz and 691 GHz was first achieved using three antennas of the Submillimeter Array (SMA) interferometer located on Mauna Kea, Hawaii. Initially, phase closure was demonstrated at 682.5 GHz on Sept. 19, 2002 using an artificial ground-based "beacon" signal. Subsequently, astronomical detections of both Saturn and Uranus were made at the frequency of the CO(6-5) transition (691.473 GHz) on all three baselines on Sept. 22, 2002. While the larger planets such as Saturn are heavily resolved even on these short baselines (25.2m, 25.2m and 16.4m), phase closure was achieved on Uranus and Callisto. This was the first successful experiment to obtain phase closure in this frequency band. The CO(6-5) line was also detected towards Orion BN/KL and other Galactic sources, as was the vibrationally-excited 658 GHz water maser line toward evolved stars. We present these historic detections, as well as the first arcsecond-scale images obtained in this frequency band.
  • Based on quantum hadrodynamics with a finite cutoff, the effective masses of vector mesons(\omega, \rho) in nuclear medium are calculated. We use a low-energy effective Lagrangian which is obtained by integrating high-energy quantum fluctuations. Although we use an artificial cutoff, the cutoff-dependence can be removed order by order. It is shown that there is a strong correlation between the effective \omega -meson mass and the effective nucleon mass at the normal density. It is also found that the effective \rho-meson mass m_\rho^* decreases as density increases. The rate of the decrease becomes smaller at high density. As a result, at the normal density, the m^*_\rho/m_\rho is 0.85 \sim 0.95.
  • We study the characteristics of molecular gas in the central regions of spiral galaxies on the basis of our CO(J=1-0) imaging survey of 20 nearby spiral galaxies using the NRO and OVRO millimeter arrays. Condensations of molecular gas at galactic centers with sizescales < 1 kpc and CO-derived masses M_gas(R<500pc) = 10^8 - 10^9 M_sun are found to be prevalent in the gas-rich L^* galaxies. Moreover, the degree of gas concentration to the central kpc is found to be higher in barred systems than in unbarred galaxies. This is the first statistical evidence for the higher central concentration of molecular gas in barred galaxies, and it strongly supports the theory of bar-driven gas transport. It is most likely that more than half of molecular gas within the central kpc of a barred galaxy was transported there from outside by the bar. The supply of gas has exceeded the consumption of gas by star formation in the central kpc, resulting in the excess gas in the centers of barred systems. The mean rate of gas inflow is statistically estimated to be larger than 0.1 - 1 M_sun/yr. The correlation between gas properties in the central kpc and the type of nuclear spectrum (HII, LINER, or Seyfert) is investigated. A correlation is found in which galaxies with larger gas-to-dynamical mass ratios tend to have HII nuclear spectra, while galaxies with smaller ratios show spectra indicating AGN. Also, the theoretical prediction of bar-dissolution by condensation of gas to galactic centers is observationally tested. It is suggested that the timescale for bar dissolution is larger than 10^8 - 10^10 yr, or a bar in a L^* galaxy is not destroyed by a condensation of 10^8 - 10^9 M_sun gas in the central kpc.
  • The dispersion relations in the real and imaginary parts of the meson self-energies are studied to check the consistency of the "renormalization" in cutoff field theory. It is shown that the dispersion relations are preserved by the "renormalization"even if the finite cutoff and regulator are introduced in the calculation by hand.
  • The NRO/OVRO imaging survey of molecular gas in 20 spiral galaxies is used to test the theoretical predictions on bar-driven gas transport, bar dissolution, and bulge evolution. In most galaxies in the survey we find gas condensations of 10^8-10^9 M_sun within the central kiloparsec, the gas masses being comparable to those needed to destroy bars in numerical models. We also find a statistically significant difference in the degree of gas concentration between barred and unbarred galaxies: molecular gas is more concentrated to the central kiloparsec in barred systems. The latter result supports the theories of bar-driven gas transport. Moreover, it constrains the balance between the rate of gas inflow and that of gas consumption (i.e., star formation, etc.), and also constrains the timescale of the possible bar dissolution. Namely, gas inflow rates to the central kiloparsec, averaged over the ages of the bars, must be larger than the mean rates of gas consumption in the central regions in order to cause and maintain the higher gas concentrations in barred galaxies. Also, the timescale for bar dissolution must be longer than that for gas consumption in the central regions by the same token.
  • The ultraluminous infrared galaxy Arp 220 has been observed at 0.5" resolution in CO(2-1) and 1 mm continuum using the newly expanded Owens Valley Millimeter Array. The CO and continuum peaks at the double nuclei and the surrounding molecular gas disk are clearly resolved. We find steep velocity gradients across each nucleus (dV ~ 500 km/s within r= 0.3") whose directions are not aligned with each other and with that of the outer gas disk. We conclude that the double nuclei have their own gas disks (r ~ 100 pc). They are counterrotating with respect to each other and embedded in the outer gas disk (r ~ 1 kpc) rotating around the dynamical center of the system. The masses of each nucleus are M_dyn > 2* 10^9 M_sun based on the CO kinematics. Although there is no evidence of an old stellar population in the optical or near infrared spectroscopy of the nuclei (probably due to the much brighter young population), it seems likely that these nuclei were 'seeded' from the pre-merger nuclei in view of their counterrotating gas kinematics. The gas disks probably constitute a significant fraction (~ 50 %) of the mass in each nucleus. The CO and continuum brightness temperatures imply that the nuclear gas disks have high area filling factors (~ 0.5-1) and have extremely high visual extinctions (Av ~ 1000 mag). The molecular gas must be hot (>= 40 K) and dense (>= 10^4-5 cm^-3), given the large mass and small scale-height of the nuclear disks. The continuum data suggest that the large luminosity (be it starburst or AGN) must originate within 100 pc of the two nuclear gas disks which were presumably formed through concentration of gas from the progenitor outer galaxy disks.
  • The properties of nuclear matter are studied in the cut-off field theory. It is found that, under the Hartree approximation, the small cut-off makes the equations of state hard, especially at higher densities. The theory is modified in the framework of the renormalization group methods with arbitrary cut-off $\Lambda^\prime$. It is found that the expansion in terms of the $\sigma$ meson field is more favorable than the naive expansion of the inverse of $\Lambda^\prime$, when we do not use very large $\Lambda^\prime$.