• The effect of metallicity on the granulation activity in stars is still poorly understood. Available spectroscopic parameters from the updated APOGEE-\textit{Kepler} catalog, coupled with high-precision photometric observations from NASA's \textit{Kepler} mission spanning more than four years of observation, make oscillating red giant stars in open clusters crucial testbeds. We determine the role of metallicity on the stellar granulation activity by discriminating its effect from that of different stellar properties such as surface gravity, mass, and temperature. We analyze 60 known red giant stars belonging to the open clusters NGC 6791, NGC 6819, and NGC 6811, spanning a metallicity range from [Fe/H] $\simeq -0.09$ to $0.32$. The parameters describing the granulation activity of these stars and their $\nu_\mathrm{max}$, are studied by considering the different masses, metallicities, and stellar evolutionary stages. We derive new scaling relations for the granulation activity, re-calibrate existing ones, and identify the best scaling relations from the available set of observations. We adopted the Bayesian code DIAMONDS for the analysis of the background signal in the Fourier spectra of the stars. We performed a Bayesian parameter estimation and model comparison to test the different model hypotheses proposed in this work and in the literature. Metallicity causes a statistically significant change in the amplitude of the granulation activity, with a dependency stronger than that induced by both stellar mass and surface gravity. We also find that the metallicity has a significant impact on the corresponding time scales of the phenomenon. The effect of metallicity on the time scale is stronger than that of mass. A higher metallicity increases the amplitude of granulation and meso-granulation signals and slows down their characteristic time scales toward longer periods.
  • With the advent of the space missions CoRoT and Kepler, it has become feasible to determine precise asteroseismic masses and ages for large samples of red-giant stars. In this paper, we present the CoRoGEE dataset -- obtained from CoRoT lightcurves for 606 red giant stars in two fields of the Galactic disc which have been co-observed for an ancillary project of APOGEE. We have used the Bayesian parameter estimation code PARAM to calculate distances, extinctions, masses, and ages for these stars in a homogeneous analysis, resulting in relative statistical uncertainties of $\sim2\%$ in distance, $\sim4\%$ in radius, $\sim9\%$ in mass and $\sim25\%$ in age. We also assess systematic age uncertainties due to different input physics and mass loss. We discuss the correlation between ages and chemical abundance patterns of field stars over a large radial range of the Milky Way's disc (5 kpc $<R_{\rm Gal}<$ 14 kpc), focussing on the [$\alpha$/Fe]-[Fe/H]-age plane in five radial bins of the Galactic disc. We find an overall agreement with the expectations of chemical-evolution models computed before the present data were available, especially for the outer regions. However, our data also indicate that a significant fraction of stars now observed near and beyond the Solar Neighbourhood migrated from inner regions. Mock CoRoGEE observations of a chemo-dynamical Milky Way disc model show that the number of high-metallicity stars in the outer disc is too high to be accounted for even by the strong radial mixing present in the model. The mock observations also reveal that the age distribution of the [$\alpha$/Fe]-enhanced sequence in the CoRoGEE inner-disc field is much broader than expected from a combination of radial mixing and observational errors. We suggest that a thick disc/bulge component that formed stars for more than 3 Gyr may account for these discrepancies.
  • We use high quality K2 light curves for hundreds of stars in the Pleiades to understand better the angular momentum evolution and magnetic dynamos of young, low mass stars. The K2 light curves provide not only rotational periods but also detailed information from the shape of the phased light curve not available in previous studies. A slowly rotating sequence begins at $(V-K_{\rm s})_0\sim$1.1 (spectral type F5) and ends at $(V-K_{\rm s})_0\sim$ 3.7 (spectral type K8), with periods rising from $\sim$2 to $\sim$11 days in that interval. Fifty-two percent of the Pleiades members in that color interval have periods within 30\% of a curve defining the slow sequence; the slowly rotating fraction decreases significantly redward of $(V-K_{\rm s})_0$=2.6. Nearly all of the slow-sequence stars show light curves that evolve significantly on timescales less than the K2 campaign duration. The majority of the FGK Pleiades members identified as photometric binaries are relatively rapidly rotating, perhaps because binarity inhibits star-disk angular momentum loss mechanisms during pre-main sequence evolution. The fully convective, late M dwarf Pleiades members (5.0 $<(V-K_{\rm s})_0<$ 6.0) nearly always show stable light curves, with little spot evolution or evidence of differential rotation. During PMS evolution from $\sim$3 Myr (NGC2264 age) to $\sim$125 Myr (Pleiades age), stars of 0.3 $M_{\odot}$ shed about half their angular momentum, with the fractional change in period between 3 and 125 Myr being nearly independent of mass for fully convective stars. Our data also suggest that very low mass binaries form with rotation periods more similar to each other and faster than would be true if drawn at random from the parent population of single stars.
  • Young (125 Myr), populous ($>$1000 members), and relatively nearby, the Pleiades has provided an anchor for stellar angular momentum models for both younger and older stars. We used K2 to explore the distribution of rotation periods in the Pleiades. With more than 500 new periods for Pleiades members, we are vastly expanding the number of Pleiads with periods, particularly at the low mass end. About 92\% of the members in our sample have at least one measured spot-modulated rotation period. For the $\sim$8\% of the members without periods, non-astrophysical effects often dominate (saturation, etc.), such that periodic signals might have been detectable, all other things being equal. We now have an unusually complete view of the rotation distribution in the Pleiades. The relationship between $P$ and $(V-K_{\rm s})_0$ follows the overall trends found in other Pleiades studies. There is a slowly rotating sequence for $1.1\lesssim(V-K_{\rm s})_0\lesssim 3.7$, and a primarily rapidly rotating population for $(V-K_{\rm s})_0\gtrsim 5.0$. There is a region in which there seems to be a disorganized relationship between $P$ and $(V-K_{\rm s})_0$ for $3.7 \lesssim(V-K_{\rm s})_0\lesssim 5.0$. Paper II continues the discussion, focusing on multi-period structures, and Paper III speculates about the origin and evolution of the period distribution in the Pleiades.
  • We use K2 to continue the exploration of the distribution of rotation periods in Pleiades that we began in Paper I. We have discovered complicated multi-period behavior in Pleiades stars using these K2 data, and we have grouped them into categories, which are the focal part of this paper. About 24% of the sample has multiple, real frequencies in the periodogram, sometimes manifesting as obvious beating in the light curves. Those having complex and/or structured periodogram peaks, unresolved multiple periods, and resolved close multiple periods are likely due to spot/spot group evolution and/or latitudinal differential rotation; these largely compose the slowly rotating sequence in $P$ vs.~$(V-K_{\rm s})_0$ identified in Paper I. The fast sequence in $P$ vs.~$(V-K_{\rm s})_0$ is dominated by single-period stars; these are likely to be rotating as solid bodies. Paper III continues the discussion, speculating about the origin and evolution of the period distribution in the Pleiades.
  • We report the discovery of a group of apparently young CoRoT red-giant stars exhibiting enhanced [alpha/Fe] abundance ratios (as determined from APOGEE spectra) with respect to Solar values. Their existence is not explained by standard chemical evolution models of the Milky Way, and shows that the chemical-enrichment history of the Galactic disc is more complex. We find similar stars in previously published samples for which isochrone-ages could be robustly obtained, although in smaller relative numbers, which could explain why these stars have not received prior attention. The young [alpha/Fe]-rich stars are much more numerous in the CoRoT-APOGEE (CoRoGEE) inner-field sample than in any other high-resolution sample available at present, as only CoRoGEE can explore the inner-disc regions and provide ages for its field stars. The kinematic properties of the young [$\alpha$/Fe]-rich stars are not clearly thick-disc like, despite their rather large distances from the Galactic mid-plane. Our tentative interpretation of these and previous intriguing observations in the Milky Way is that these stars were formed close to the end of the Galactic bar, near corotation -- a region where gas can be kept inert for longer times, compared to other regions shocked more frequently by the passage of spiral arms. Moreover, that is where the mass return from older inner-disc stellar generations should be maximal (according to an inside-out disc-formation scenario), further diluting the in-situ gas. Other possibilities to explain these observations (e.g., a recent gas-accretion event) are also discussed.
  • We investigate the chemo-kinematic properties of the Milky Way disc by exploring the first year of data from the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE), and compare our results to smaller optical high-resolution samples in the literature, as well as results from lower resolution surveys such as GCS, SEGUE and RAVE. We start by selecting a high-quality sample in terms of chemistry ($\sim$ 20.000 stars) and, after computing distances and orbital parameters for this sample, we employ a number of useful subsets to formulate constraints on Galactic chemical and chemodynamical evolution processes in the Solar neighbourhood and beyond (e.g., metallicity distributions -- MDFs, [$\alpha$/Fe] vs. [Fe/H] diagrams, and abundance gradients). Our red giant sample spans distances as large as 10 kpc from the Sun. We find remarkable agreement between the recently published local (d $<$ 100 pc) high-resolution high-S/N HARPS sample and our local HQ sample (d $<$ 1 kpc). The local MDF peaks slightly below solar metallicity, and exhibits an extended tail towards [Fe/H] $= -$1, whereas a sharper cut-off is seen at larger metallicities. The APOGEE data also confirm the existence of a gap in the [$\alpha$/Fe] vs. [Fe/H] abundance diagram. When expanding our sample to cover three different Galactocentric distance bins, we find the high-[$\alpha$/Fe] stars to be rare towards the outer zones, as previously suggested in the literature. For the gradients in [Fe/H] and [$\alpha$/Fe], measured over a range of 6 $ < $ R $ <$ 11 kpc in Galactocentric distance, we find a good agreement with the gradients traced by the GCS and RAVE dwarf samples. For stars with 1.5 $<$ z $<$ 3 kpc, we find a positive metallicity gradient and a negative gradient in [$\alpha$/Fe].
  • We have analyzed a number of intense X-ray flares observed in the Chandra Orion Ultradeep Project (COUP), a 13 days observation of the Orion Nebula Cluster (ONC). Analysis of the flare decay allows to determine the size, peak density and magnetic field of the flaring structure. A total of 32 events (the most powerful 1% of COUP flares), have sufficient statistics for the analysis. A broad range of decay times (from 10 to 400 ks) are present in the sample. Peak flare temperatures are often very high, with half of the flares in the sample showing temperatures in excess of 100 MK. Significant sustained heating is present in the majority of the flares. The magnetic structures which are found, are in a number of cases very long, with semi-lengths up to 10^12 cm, implying the presence of magnetic fields of hundreds of G extending to comparable distance from the stellar photosphere. These very large sizes for the flaring structures ($ >> R_*) are not found in more evolved stars, where, almost invariably, the same type of analysis results in structures with L <= R_*. As the majority of young stars in the ONC are surrounded by disks, we speculate that the large magnetic structures which confine the flaring plasma are actually the same type of structures which channel the plasma in the magnetospheric accretion paradigm, connecting the star's photosphere with the accretion disk.
  • We report the discovery of two spectroscopic binaries in the field of the old open cluster M67 -- S1063 and S1113 -- whose positions in the color-magnitude diagram place them approximately 1 mag below the subgiant branch. A ROSAT study of M67 independently discovered these stars to be X-ray sources. Both have proper-motion membership probabilities greater than 97%; precise center-of-mass velocities are consistent with the cluster mean radial velocity. S1063 is also projected within one core radius of the cluster center. S1063 is a single-lined binary with a period of 18.396 days and an orbital eccentricity of 0.206. S1113 is a double-lined system with a circular orbit having a period of 2.823094 days. The primary stars of both binaries are subgiants. The secondary of S1113 is likely a 0.9 Mo main-sequence star, which implies a 1.3 Mo primary star. We have been unable to explain securely the low apparent luminosities of the primary stars; neither binary contain stars presently limited in radius by their Roche lobes. We speculate that S1063 and S1113 may be the products of close stellar encounters involving binaries in the cluster environment, and may define alternative stellar evolutionary tracks associated with mass-transfer episodes, mergers, and/or dynamical stellar exchanges.