• The first transiting planetesimal orbiting a white dwarf was recently detected in K2 data of WD1145+017 and has been followed up intensively. The multiple, long, and variable transits suggest the transiting objects are dust clouds, probably produced by a disintegrating asteroid. In addition, the system contains circumstellar gas, evident by broad absorption lines, mostly in the u'-band, and a dust disc, indicated by an infrared excess. Here we present the first detection of a change in colour of WD1145+017 during transits, using simultaneous multi-band fast-photometry ULTRACAM measurements over the u'g'r'i'-bands. The observations reveal what appears to be 'bluing' during transits; transits are deeper in the redder bands, with a u'-r' colour difference of up to ~-0.05 mag. We explore various possible explanations for the bluing. 'Spectral' photometry obtained by integrating over bandpasses in the spectroscopic data in- and out-of-transit, compared to the photometric data, shows that the observed colour difference is most likely the result of reduced circumstellar absorption in the spectrum during transits. This indicates that the transiting objects and the gas share the same line-of-sight, and that the gas covers the white dwarf only partially, as would be expected if the gas, the transiting debris, and the dust emitting the infrared excess, are part of the same general disc structure (although possibly at different radii). In addition, we present the results of a week-long monitoring campaign of the system.
  • The Large Binocular Telescope Interferometer (LBTI) is a versatile instrument designed for high-angular resolution and high-contrast infrared imaging (1.5-13 microns). In this paper, we focus on the mid-infrared (8-13 microns) nulling mode and present its theory of operation, data reduction, and on-sky performance as of the end of the commissioning phase in March 2015. With an interferometric baseline of 14.4 meters, the LBTI nuller is specifically tuned to resolve the habitable zone of nearby main-sequence stars, where warm exozodiacal dust emission peaks. Measuring the exozodi luminosity function of nearby main-sequence stars is a key milestone to prepare for future exoEarth direct imaging instruments. Thanks to recent progress in wavefront control and phase stabilization, as well as in data reduction techniques, the LBTI demonstrated in February 2015 a calibrated null accuracy of 0.05% over a three-hour long observing sequence on the bright nearby A3V star beta Leo. This is equivalent to an exozodiacal disk density of 15 to 30 zodi for a Sun-like star located at 10pc, depending on the adopted disk model. This result sets a new record for high-contrast mid-infrared interferometric imaging and opens a new window on the study of planetary systems.
  • We report on the first nulling interferometric observations with the Large Binocular Telescope Interferometer (LBTI), resolving the N' band (9.81 - 12.41 um) emission around the nearby main-sequence star eta Crv (F2V, 1-2 Gyr). The measured source null depth amounts to 4.40% +/- 0.35% over a field-of-view of 140 mas in radius (~2.6\,AU at the distance of eta Corvi) and shows no significant variation over 35{\deg} of sky rotation. This relatively low null is unexpected given the total disk to star flux ratio measured by Spitzer/IRS (~23% across the N' band), suggesting that a significant fraction of the dust lies within the central nulled response of the LBTI (79 mas or 1.4 AU). Modeling of the warm disk shows that it cannot resemble a scaled version of the Solar zodiacal cloud, unless it is almost perpendicular to the outer disk imaged by Herschel. It is more likely that the inner and outer disks are coplanar and the warm dust is located at a distance of 0.5-1.0 AU, significantly closer than previously predicted by models of the IRS spectrum (~3 AU). The predicted disk sizes can be reconciled if the warm disk is not centrosymmetric, or if the dust particles are dominated by very small grains. Both possibilities hint that a recent collision has produced much of the dust. Finally, we discuss the implications for the presence of dust at the distance where the insolation is the same as Earth's (2.3 AU).
  • Clumpy structure in the debris disk around Vega has been previously reported at millimeter wavelengths and attributed to concentrations of dust grains trapped in resonances with an unseen planet. However, recent imaging at similar wavelengths with higher sensitivity has disputed the observed structure. We present three new millimeter-wavelength observations that help to resolve the puzzling and contradictory observations. We have observed the Vega system with the Submillimeter Array (SMA) at a wavelength of 880 um and angular resolution of 5"; with the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy (CARMA) at a wavelength of 1.3 mm and angular resolution of 5"; and with the Green Bank Telescope (GBT) at a wavelength of 3.3 mm and angular resolution of 10". Despite high sensitivity and short baselines, we do not detect the Vega debris disk in either of the interferometric data sets (SMA and CARMA), which should be sensitive at high significance to clumpy structure based on previously reported observations. We obtain a marginal (3-sigma) detection of disk emission in the GBT data; the spatial distribution of the emission is not well constrained. We analyze the observations in the context of several different models, demonstrating that the observations are consistent with a smooth, broad, axisymmetric disk with inner radius 20-100 AU and width >50 AU. The interferometric data require that at least half of the 860 um emission detected by previous single-dish observations with the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope be distributed axisymmetrically, ruling out strong contributions from flux concentrations on spatial scales of <100 AU. These observations support recent results from the Plateau de Bure Interferometer indicating that previous detections of clumpy structure in the Vega debris disk were spurious.
  • In this paper we present a model of the Beta Leo debris disc, with an emphasis on modelling the resolved PACS images obtained as part of the Herschel key programme DEBRIS. We also present new SPIRE images of the disc at 250 microns, as well as new constraints on the disc from SCUBA-2, mid-IR and scattered light imaging. Combining all available observational constraints, we find three possible models for the Beta Leo (HD102647) debris disc: (i) A 2 component model, comprised of a hot component at 2 AU and a cold component from 15-70 AU. (ii) A 3 component model with hot dust at 2 AU, warm dust at 9 AU, and a cold component from 30-70 AU, is equally valid since the cold emission is not resolved within 30 AU. (iii) A somewhat less likely possibility is that the system consists of a single very eccentric planetesimal population, with pericentres at 2 AU and apocentres at 65 AU. Thus, despite the wealth of observational constraints significant ambiguities remain; deep mid-IR and scattered light imaging of the dust distribution within 30 AU seems the most promising method to resolve the degeneracy. We discuss the implications for the possible planetary system architecture; e.g., the 2 component model suggests planets may exist at 2-15 AU, while the 3 component model suggests planets between 2-30 AU with a stable region containing the dust belt at 9 AU, and there should be no planets between 2-65 AU in the eccentric planetesimal model. We suggest that the hot dust may originate in the disintegration of comets scattered in from the cold disc, and examine all A stars known to harbour both hot and cold dust to consider the possibility that the ratio of hot and cold dust luminosities is indicative of the intervening planetary system architecture.
  • In our Spitzer 24 \mu m survey of hot white dwarfs (WDs) and archival Spitzer study of pre-WDs, i.e., central stars of planetary nebulae (CSPNs), we found mid-IR excesses for -15 WDs/pre-WDs. These mid-IR excesses are indicative of the presence of circumstellar dust that could be produced by sub-planetary objects. To further assess the nature of these IR-excesses, we have obtained Spitzer IRS, Gemini NIRI and Michelle, and KPNO 4m echelle spectra of these objects. In this paper we present the analysis of these spectroscopic observations and discuss the nature of these IR excesses.
  • A debris ring around the star HD 207129 (G0V; d = 16.0 pc) has been imaged in scattered visible light with the ACS coronagraph on the Hubble Space Telescope and in thermal emission using MIPS on the Spitzer Space Telescope at 70 microns (resolved) and 160 microns (unresolved). Spitzer IRS (7-35 microns) and MIPS (55-90 microns) spectrographs measured disk emission at >28 microns. In the HST image the disk appears as a ~30 AU wide ring with a mean radius of ~163 AU and is inclined by 60 degrees from pole-on. At 70 microns it appears partially resolved and is elongated in the same direction and with nearly the same size as seen with HST in scattered light. At 0.6 microns the ring shows no significant brightness asymmetry, implying little or no forward scattering by its constituent dust. With a mean surface brightness of V=23.7 mag per square arcsec, it is the faintest disk imaged to date in scattered light.
  • Spitzer and Caltech Submillimeter Observatory (CSO) images and spectrophotometry of epsilon Eridani at wavelengths from 3.5 to 350 um reveal new details of its bright debris disk. The 350 um map confirms the presence of a ring at r = 11-28 arcsec (35-90 AU) observed previously at longer sub-mm wavelengths. The Spitzer mid- and far-IR images do not show the ring, but rather a featureless disk extending from within a few arcsec of the star across the ring to r ~ 34 arcsec (110 AU). The spectral energy distribution (SED) of the debris system implies a complex structure. A model constrained by the surface brightness profiles and the SED indicates that the sub-mm ring emission is primarily from large (a ~ 135 um) grains, with smaller (a ~ 15 um) grains also present in and beyond the ring. The Spitzer IRS and MIPS SED-mode spectrophotometry data clearly show the presence of spatially compact excess emission at lambda > 15 um that requires the presence of two additional narrow belts of dust within the sub-mm ring's central void. The innermost belt at r ~ 3 AU is composed of silicate dust. A simple dynamical model suggests that dust produced collisionally by a population of about 11 M_Earth of planetesimals in the sub-mm ring could be the source of the emission from both in and beyond the sub-mm ring. Maintaining the inner belts and the inner edge to the sub-mm ring may require the presence of three planets in this system including the candidate radial velocity object.
  • We determine an absolute calibration for the MIPS 24 microns band and recommend adjustments to the published calibrations for 2MASS, IRAC, and IRAS photometry to put them on the same scale. We show that consistent results are obtained by basing the calibration on either an average A0V star spectral energy distribution (SED), or by using the absolutely calibrated SED of the sun in comparison with solar-type stellar photometry (the solar analog method). After the rejection of a small number of stars with anomalous SEDs (or bad measurements), upper limits of ~ 1.5% (rms) are placed on the intrinsic infrared SED variations in both A dwarf and solar-type stars. These types of stars are therefore suitable as general-purpose standard stars in the infrared. We provide absolutely calibrated SEDs for a standard zero magnitude A star and for the sun to allow extending this work to any other infrared photometric system. They allow the recommended calibration to be applied from 1 to 25 microns with an accuracy of ~2 %, and with even higher accuracy at specific wavelengths such as 2.2, 10.6, and 24 microns, near which there are direct measurements. However, we confirm earlier indications that Vega does not behave as a typical A0V star between the visible and the infrared, making it problematic as the defining star for photometric systems. The integration of measurements of the sun with those of solar-type stars also provides an accurate estimate of the solar SED from 1 through 30 microns, which we show agrees with theoretical models.
  • We have obtained Spitzer IRS 5.5 - 35 micron spectroscopy of the debris disk around beta Pictoris. In addition to the 10 micron silicate emission feature originally observed from the ground, we also detect the crystalline silicate emission bands at 28 micron and 33.5 micron. This is the first time that the silicate bands at wavelengths longer than 10 micron have ever been seen in the beta Pictoris disk. The observed dust emission is well reproduced by a dust model consisting of fluffy cometary and crystalline olivine aggregates. We searched for line emission from molecular hydrogen and atomic [S I], Fe II, and Si II gas but detected none. We place a 3 sigma upper limit of <17 Earth masses on the H2 S(1) gas mass, assuming an excitation temperature of Tex = 100 K. This suggests that there is less gas in this system than is required to form the envelope of Jupiter. We hypothesize that some of the atomic Na I gas observed in Keplerian rotation around beta Pictoris may be produced by photon-stimulated desorption from circumstellar dust grains.
  • We present 3-160 micron photometry obtained with the IRAC and MIPS instruments for the first five targets from the Spitzer Legacy Science Program "Formation and Evolution of Planetary Systems" and 4-35 micron spectro-photometry obtained with the IRS for two sources. We discuss in detail our observations of the debris disks surrounding HD 105 (G0V, 30 +- 10 Myr) and HD 150706 (G3V, ~ 700 +- 300 Myr). For HD 105, possible interpretations include large bodies clearing the dust inside of 45 AU or a reservoir of gas capable of sculpting the dust distribution. The disk surrounding HD 150706 also exhibits evidence of a large inner hole in its dust distribution. Of the four survey targets without previously detected IR excess, spanning ages 30 Myr to 3 Gyr, the new detection of excess in just one system of intermediate age suggests a variety of initial conditions or divergent evolutionary paths for debris disk systems orbiting solar-type stars.