• We introduce a new resistance measurement method that is useful in characterizing materials with both surface and bulk conduction, such as three-dimensional topological insulators. The transport geometry for this new resistance measurement configuration consists of one current lead as a closed loop that fully encloses the other current lead on the surface, and two voltage leads that are both placed outside the loop. We show that in the limit where the transport is dominated by the surface conductivity of the material, the four-terminal resistance measured from such a transport geometry is proportional to $\sigma_b/\sigma_s^2$, where $\sigma_b$ and $\sigma_s$ are the bulk and surface conductivities of the material, respectively. We call this new type of measurement \textit{inverted resistance measurement}, as the resistance scales inversely with the bulk resistivity. We discuss possible implementations of this new method by performing numerical calculations on different geometries and introduce strategies to extract the bulk and surface conductivities. We also demonstrate inverted resistance measurements on SmB$_6$, a topological Kondo insulator, using both single-sided and coaxially-aligned double-sided Corbino disk transport geometries. Using this new method, we are able to measure the bulk conductivity, even at low temperatures, where the bulk conduction is much smaller than the surface conduction in this material.
  • SmB$_6$ exhibits a small (15-20 meV) bandgap at low temperatures due to hybridized $d$ and $f$ electrons, a tiny (3 meV) transport activation energy $(E_{A})$ above 4 K, and surface states accessible to transport below 2 K. We study its magnetoresistance in 60-T pulsed fields between 1.5 K and 4 K. The response of the nearly $T$-independent surface states (which show no Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations) is distinct from that of the activated bulk. $E_{A}$ shrinks by 50% under fields up to 60 T. Data up to 93 T suggest that this trend continues beyond 100 T, in contrast with previous explanations. It rules out emerging theories to explain observed exotic magnetic quantum oscillations.
  • The weakness of electron-electron correlations in the itinerant antiferromagnet Cr doped with V has long been considered the reason that neither new collective electronic states or even non Fermi liquid behaviour are observed when antiferromagnetism in Cr$_{1-x}$V$_{x}$ is suppressed to zero temperature. We present the results of neutron and electron diffraction measurements of several lightly doped single crystals of Cr$_{1-x}$V$_{x}$ in which the archtypal spin density wave instability is progressively suppressed as the V content increases, freeing the nesting-prone Fermi surface for a new striped charge instability that occurs at x$_{c}$=0.037. This novel nesting driven instability relieves the entropy accumulation associated with the suppression of the spin density wave and avoids the formation of a quantum critical point by stabilising a new type of charge order at temperatures in excess of 400 K. Restructuring of the Fermi surface near quantum critical points is a feature found in materials as diverse as heavy fermions, high temperature copper oxide superconductors and now even elemental metals such as Cr.
  • Taken together and viewed holistically, recent theory, low temperature (T) transport, photoelectron spectroscopy and quantum oscillation experiments have built a very strong case that the paradigmatic mixed valence insulator SmB6 is currently unique as a three-dimensional strongly correlated topological insulator (TI). As such, its many-body T-dependent bulk gap brings an extra richness to the physics beyond that of the weakly correlated TI materials. How will the robust, symmetry-protected TI surface states evolve as the gap closes with increasing T? For SmB6 exploiting this opportunity first requires resolution of other important gap-related issues, its origin, its magnitude, its T-dependence and its role in bulk transport. In this paper we report detailed T-dependent angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) measurements that answer all these questions in a unified way.
  • In Kondo insulator samarium hexaboride SmB$_6$, strong correlation and band hybridization lead to an insulating gap and a diverging resistance at low temperature. The resistance divergence ends at about 5 Kelvin, a behavior recently demonstrated to arise from the surface conductance. However, questions remain whether and where a topological surface state exists. Quantum oscillations have not been observed to map the Fermi surface. We solve the problem by resolving the Landau Level quantization and Fermi surface topology using torque magnetometry. The observed Fermi surface suggests a two dimensional surface state on the (101) plane. Furthermore, the tracking of the Landau Levels in the infinite magnetic field limit points to -1/2, which indicates a 2D Dirac electronic state.
  • We report observation of the enhancement of superconductivity near lattice dislocations and the absence of the strengthening of vortex pinning in odd-parity superconductor Sr$_2$RuO$_4$, both surprising results in direct contrast to the well known sensitivity of superconductivity in Sr$_2$RuO$_4$ to disorder. The enhanced superconductivity appears to be related fundamentally to the two-component nature of the superconducting order parameter, as revealed in our phenomenological theory taking into account the effect of symmetry reduction near a dislocation.
  • Aims: We aim at deriving the excitation conditions of the interstellar gas as well as the local FUV intensities in the molecular cloud surrounding NGC 3603 to get a coherent picture of how the gas is energized by the central stars. Methods: The NANTEN2-4m submillimeter antenna is used to map the [CI] 1-0, 2-1 and CO 4-3, 7-6 lines in a 2' x 2' region around the young OB cluster NGC 3603 YC. These data are combined with C18O 2-1 data, HIRES-processed IRAS 60 and 100 micron maps of the FIR continuum, and Spitzer/IRAC maps. Results: The NANTEN2 observations show the presence of two molecular clumps located south-east and south-west of the cluster and confirm the overall structure already found by previous CS and C18O observations. We find a slight position offset of the peak intensity of CO and [CI], and the atomic carbon appears to be further extended compared to the molecular material. We used the HIRES far-infrared dust data to derive a map of the FUV field heating the dust. We constrain the FUV field to values of \chi = 3 - 6 \times 10^3 in units of the Draine field across the clouds. Approximately 0.2 to 0.3 % of the total FUV energy is re-emitted in the [CII] 158 {\mu}m cooling line observed by ISO. Applying LTE and escape probability calculations, we derive temperatures (TMM1 = 43 K, TMM2 = 47 K), column densities (N(MM1) = 0.9 \times 10^22 cm^-2, N(MM2) = 2.5 \times 10^22 cm^-2) and densities (n(MM1) = 3 \times 10^3 cm^-3, n(MM2) = 10^3 -10^4 cm^-3) for the two observed molecular clumps MM1 and MM2. Conclusions: The cluster is strongly interacting with the ambient molecular cloud, governing its structure and physical conditions. A stability analysis shows the existence of gravitationally collapsing gas clumps which should lead to star formation. Embedded IR sources have already been observed in the outskirts of the molecular cloud and seem to support our conclusions.
  • In this paper we discuss the physical conditions of clumpy nature in the IC 348 molecular cloud. We combine new observations of fully sampled maps in [C I] at 492 GHz and 12CO 4--3, taken with the KOSMA 3 m telescope at about 1' resolution, with FCRAO data of 12CO 1--0, 13CO 1--0 and far-infrared continuum data observed by HIRES/IRAS. To derive the physical parameters of the region we analyze the three different line ratios. A first rough estimate of abundance is obtained from an LTE analysis. To understand the [C I] and CO emission from the PDRs in IC 348, we use a clumpy PDR model. With an ensemble of identical clumps, we constrain the total mass from the observed absolute intensities. Then we apply a more realistic clump distribution model with a power law index of 1.8 for clump-mass spectrum and a power law index of 2.3 for mass-size relation. We provide detailed fits to observations at seven representative positions in the cloud, revealing clump densities between 4 10$^{4}$ cm$^{-3}$ and 4 10$^{5}$ cm$^{-3}$ and C/CO column density ratios between 0.02 and 0.26. The derived FUV flux from the model fit is consistent with the field calculated from FIR continuum data, varying between 2 and 100 Draine units across the cloud. We find that both an ensemble of identical clumps and an ensemble with a power law clump mass distribution produce line intensities which are in good agreement (within a factor ~ 2) with the observed intensities. The models confirm the anti-correlation between the C/CO abundance ratio and the hydrogen column density found in many regions.
  • Star formation at earlier cosmological times takes place in an interstellar medium with low metallicity. The Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) is ideally suited to study star formation in such an environment. The physical and chemical state of the ISM in a star forming environment can be constrained by observations of submm and FIR spectral lines of the main carbon carrying species, CO, CI and CII, which originate in the surface layers of molecular clouds illuminated by the UV radiation of the newly formed, young stars. We present high-angular resolution sub-millimeter observations in the N159W region in the LMC obtained with the NANTEN2 telescope of the 12CO J = 4-3, J = 7-6, and 13CO J = 4-3 rotational and [CI] 3P1-3P0 and 3P2-3P1 fine-structure transitions. The 13CO J =4-3 and [CI] 3P2-3P1 transitions are detected for the first time in the LMC. We derive the physical and chemical properties of the low-metallicity molecular gas using an escape probability code and a self-consistent solution of the chemistry and thermal balance of the gas in the framework of a clumpy cloud PDR model. The separate excitation analysis of the submm CO lines and the carbon fine structure lines shows that the emitting gas in the N159W region has temperatures of about 80 K and densities of about 10^4 cm^-3. The estimated C to CO abundance ratio close to unity is substantially higher than in dense massive star-forming regions in the Milky Way. The analysis of all observed lines together, including the [CII] line intensity reported in the literature, in the context of a clumpy cloud PDR model constrains the UV intensity to about \chi ~220 and an average density of the clump ensemble of about 10^5 cm^-3, thus confirming the presence of high density material in the LMC N159W region.
  • The Carina region is an excellent astrophysical laboratory for studying the feedback mechanisms of newly born, very massive stars within their natal giant molecular clouds (GMCs) at only 2.35 kpc distance. We use a clumpy PDR model to analyse the observed intensities of atomic carbon and CO and to derive the excitation conditions of the gas. The NANTEN2-4m submillimeter telescope was used to map the [CI] 3P1-3P0, 3P2-3P1 and CO 4-3, 7-6 lines in two 4'x4' regions of Carina where molecular material interfaces with radiation from the massive star clusters. One region is the northern molecular cloud near the compact OB cluster Tr14, and the second region is in the molecular cloud south of etaCar and Tr16. These data were combined with 13CO SEST spectra, HIRES/IRAS 60um and 100um maps of the FIR continuum, and maps of 8um IRAC/Spitzer and MSX emission. We used the HIRES far-infrared dust data to create a map of the FUV field heating the gas. The northern region shows an FUV field of a few 1000 in Draine units while the field of the southern region is about a factor 10 weaker. We constructed models consisting of an ensemble of small spherically symmetric PDR clumps within the 38" beam (0.43pc), which follow canonical power-law mass and mass-size distributions. We find that an average local clump density of 2x10**5 cm-3 is needed to reproduce the observed line emission at two selected interface positions. Stationary, clumpy PDR models reproduce the observed cooling lines of atomic carbon and CO at two positions in the Carina Nebula.
  • Characterizing the spatial and velocity structure of molecular clouds is a first step towards a better understanding of interstellar turbulence and its link to star formation. We present observations and structure analysis results for a large-scale (~ 7.10 deg^2) 13CO J = 2--1 and 12 CO J = 3--2 survey towards the nearby Perseus molecular cloud observed with the KOSMA 3m telescope. We study the spatial structure of line-integrated and velocity channel maps, measuring the $\Delta$-variance as a function of size scale. We determine the spectral index $\beta$ of the corresponding power spectrum and study its variation across the cloud and across the lines. We find that the spectra of all CO line-integrated maps of the whole complex show the same index, $\beta$ ~ 3.1, for scales between about 0.2 and 3pc, independent of isotopomer and rotational transition. A complementary 2MASS map of optical extinction shows a noticeably smaller index of 2.6. In contrast to the overall region, the CO maps of individual subregions show a significant variation of $\beta$. The 12CO 3--2 data provide e.g. a spread of indices between 2.9 in L1455 and 3.5 in NGC1333. In general, active star forming regions show a larger power-law exponent. We find that the $\Delta$-variance spectra of individual velocity channel maps are very sensitive to optical depth effects clearly indicating self-absorption in the densest regions. When studying the dependence of the channel-map spectra as a function of the velocity channel width, the expected systematic increase of the spectral index with channel width is only detected in the blue line wings.This could be explained by a filamentary, pillar-like structure which is left at low velocities while the overall molecular gas is swept up by a supernova shock wave.