• The scattering trans-Neptunian Objects (TNOs) can be measured to smaller sizes than any other distant small-body population. We use the largest sample yet obtained, 68 discoveries, primarily by the Outer Solar System Origins Survey (OSSOS), to constrain the slope of its luminosity distribution, with sensitivity to much fainter absolute $H$ magnitudes than previous work. Using the analysis technique in Shankman et al. (2016), we confirm that a single slope for the $H$-distribution is not an accurate representation of the scattering TNOs and Centaurs, and that a break in the distribution is required, in support of previous conclusions. A bright-end slope of $\alpha_b=0.9$ transitioning to a faint-end slope $\alpha_f$ of 0.4-0.5 with a differential number contrast $c$ from 1 (a knee) to 10 (a divot) provides an acceptable match to our data. We find that break magnitudes $H_b$ of 7.7 and 8.3, values both previously suggested for dynamically hot Kuiper belt populations, are equally non-rejectable for a range of $\alpha_f$ and $c$ in our statistical analysis. Our preferred divot $H$-distribution transitions to $\alpha_f=0.5$ with a divot of contrast $c=3$ at $H_b=8.3$, while our preferred knee $H$-distribution transitions to $\alpha_f=0.4$ at $H_b=7.7$. The intrinsic population of scattering TNOs required to match the OSSOS detections is $3\times10^6$ for $H_r<12$, and $9\times10^4$ for $H_r<8.66$ ($D\gtrsim100$~km), with Centaurs having an intrinsic population two orders of magnitude smaller.
  • The Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) on the {\em Spitzer Space Telescope} observed nearly 800 point sources in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), taking over 1,000 spectra. 197 of these targets were observed as part of the Sage-Spec Spitzer Legacy program; the remainder are from a variety of different calibration, guaranteed time and open time projects. We classify these point sources into types according to their infrared spectral features, continuum and spectral energy distribution shape, bolometric luminosity, cluster membership, and variability information, using a decision-tree classification method. We then refine the classification using supplementary information from the astrophysical literature. We find that our IRS sample is comprised substantially of YSO and H\,{\sc ii} regions, post-Main Sequence low-mass stars: (post-)AGB stars and planetary nebulae and massive stars including several rare evolutionary types. Two supernova remnants, a nova and several background galaxies were also observed. We use these classifications to improve our understanding of the stellar populations in the Large Magellanic Cloud, study the composition and characteristics of dust species in a variety of LMC objects, and to verify the photometric classification methods used by mid-IR surveys. We discover that some widely-used catalogues of objects contain considerable contamination and others are missing sources in our sample.
  • The Infrared Spectrograph on the Spitzer Space Telescope observed 184 carbon stars in the Magellanic Clouds. This sample reveals that the dust-production rate (DPR) from carbon stars generally increases with the pulsation period of the star. The composition of the dust grains follows two condensation sequences, with more SiC condensing before amorphous carbon in metal-rich stars, and the order reversed in metal-poor stars. MgS dust condenses in optically thicker dust shells, and its condensation is delayed in more metal-poor stars. Metal-poor carbon stars also tend to have stronger absorption from C2H2 at 7.5 um. The relation between DPR and pulsation period shows significant apparent scatter, which results from the initial mass of the star, with more massive stars occupying a sequence parallel to lower-mass stars, but shifted to longer periods. Accounting for differences in the mass distribution between the carbon stars observed in the Small and Large Magellanic Clouds reveals a hint of a subtle decrease in the DPR at lower metallicities, but it is not statistically significant. The most deeply embedded carbon stars have lower variability amplitudes and show SiC in absorption. In some cases they have bluer colors at shorter wavelengths, suggesting that the central star is becoming visible. These deeply embedded stars may be evolving off of the AGB and/or they may have non-spherical dust geometries.
  • We measure the absolute magnitude, $H$, distribution, $dN(H) \propto 10^{\alpha H}$ of the scattering Trans-Neptunian Objects (TNOs) as a proxy for their size-frequency distribution. We show that the H-distribution of the scattering TNOs is not consistent with a single-slope distribution, but must transition around $H_g \sim 9$ to either a knee with a shallow slope or to a divot, which is a differential drop followed by second exponential distribution. Our analysis is based on a sample of 22 scattering TNOs drawn from three different TNO surveys, the Canada-France Ecliptic Plane Survey (CFEPS, Petit et al. 2011), Alexandersen et al. (2014), and the Outer Solar System Origins Survey (OSSOS, Bannister et al. 2016), all of which provide well characterized detection thresholds, combined with a cosmogonic model for the formation of the scattering TNO population. Our measured absolute magnitude distribution result is independent of the choice of cosmogonic model. Based on our analysis, we estimate that number of scattering TNOs is (2.4-8.3)$\times 10^5$ for $H_r < 12$. A divot $H$-distribution is seen in a variety of formation scenarios and may explain several puzzles in Kuiper Belt science. We find that a divot $H$-distribution simultaneously explains the observed scattering TNO, Neptune Trojan, Plutino, and Centaur $H$-distributions while simultaneously predicting a large enough scattering TNO population to act as the sole supply of the Jupiter-Family Comets.
  • The Magellanic clouds are uniquely placed to study the stellar contribution to dust emission. Individual stars can be resolved in these systems even in the mid-infrared, and they are close enough to allow detection of infrared excess caused by dust.We have searched the Spitzer Space Telescope data archive for all Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) staring-mode observations of the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) and found that 209 Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) point sources within the footprint of the Surveying the Agents of Galaxy Evolution in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SAGE-SMC) Spitzer Legacy programme were targeted, within a total of 311 staring mode observations. We classify these point sources using a decision tree method of object classification, based on infrared spectral features, continuum and spectral energy distribution shape, bolometric luminosity, cluster membership and variability information. We find 58 asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars, 51 young stellar objects (YSOs), 4 post-AGB objects, 22 Red Supergiants (RSGs), 27 stars (of which 23 are dusty OB stars), 24 planetary nebulae (PNe), 10Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars, 3 Hii regions, 3 R Coronae Borealis (R CrB) stars, 1 Blue Supergiant and 6 other objects, including 2 foreground AGB stars. We use these classifications to evaluate the success of photometric classification methods reported in the literature.
  • The Canada-France Ecliptic Plane Survey discovered four trans-Neptunian objects with semi-major axes near the 5:1 resonance, revealing a large and previously undetected intrinsic population. Three of these objects are currently resonant with Neptune, and the fourth is consistent with being an object that escaped the resonance at some point in the past. The non-resonant object may be representative of a detached population that is stable at slightly lower semi-major axes than the 5:1 resonance. We generated clones of these objects by resampling the astrometric uncertainty and examined their behavior over a 4.5 Gyr numerical simulation. The majority of the clones of the three resonant objects (>90%) spend a total of 10^7 years in resonance during their 4.5 Gyr integrations; most clones experience multiple periods of resonance capture. Our dynamical integrations reveal an exchange between the 5:1 resonance, the scattering objects, and other large semi-major axis resonances, especially the 4:1, 6:1, and 7:1. The multiple capture events and relatively short resonance lifetimes after capture suggest that these objects are captured scattering objects that stick in the 5:1 resonance. These 5:1 resonators may be representative of a temporary population, requiring regular contributions from a source population. We examined the dynamical characteristics (inclination, eccentricity, resonant island, libration amplitude) of the detected objects and their clones in order to provide an empirical model of the orbit structure of the 5:1 resonance. This resonance is dynamically hot and includes primarily symmetric librators. Given our orbit model, the intrinsic population necessary for the detection of these three objects in the 5:1 resonance is 1900(+3300 -1400, 95% confidence) with H_g< 8 and e > 0.5.
  • When modelling an ionised plasma, all spectral synthesis codes need the thermally averaged free-free Gaunt factor defined over a very wide range of parameter space in order to produce an accurate prediction for the spectrum. Until now no data set exists that would meet these needs completely. We have therefore produced a table of relativistic Gaunt factors over a much wider range of parameter space than has ever been produced before. We present tables of the thermally averaged Gaunt factor covering the range log10(gamma^2) = -6 to 10 and log10(u) = -16 to 13 for all atomic numbers Z = 1 through 36. The data were calculated using the relativistic Bethe-Heitler-Elwert (BHE) approximation and were subsequently merged with accurate non-relativistic results in those parts of the parameter space where the BHE approximation is not valid. These data will be incorporated in the next major release of the spectral synthesis code Cloudy. We also produced tables of the frequency integrated Gaunt factor covering the parameter space log10(gamma^2) = -6 to 10 for all values of Z between 1 and 36. All the data presented in this paper are available online.
  • Modern spectral synthesis codes need the thermally averaged free-free Gaunt factor defined over a very wide range of parameter space in order to produce an accurate prediction for the spectrum emitted by an ionized plasma. Until now no set of data exists that would meet this need in a fully satisfactory way. We have therefore undertaken to produce a table of very accurate non-relativistic Gaunt factors over a much wider range of parameters than has ever been produced before. We first produced a table of non-averaged Gaunt factors, covering the parameter space log10(epsilon_i) = -20 to +10 and log10(w) = -30 to +25. We then continued to produce a table of thermally averaged Gaunt factors covering the parameter space log10(gamma^2) = -6 to +10 and log10(u) = -16 to +13. Finally we produced a table of the frequency integrated Gaunt factor covering the parameter space log10(gamma^2) = -6 to +10. All the data presented in this paper are available online.
  • K-band spectra are presented for a sample of 39 Spitzer IRS SAGE-Spec sources in the Large Magellanic Cloud. The spectra exhibit characteristics in very good agreement with their positions in the near infrared - Spitzer color-magnitude diagrams and their properties as deduced from the Spitzer IRS spectra. Specifically, the near infrared spectra show strong atomic and molecular features representative of oxygen-rich and carbon-rich asymptotic giant branch stars, respectively. A small subset of stars were chosen from the luminous and red extreme "tip" of the color magnitude diagram. These objects have properties consistent with dusty envelopes but also cool, carbon-rich "stellar" cores. Modest amounts of dust mass loss combine with the stellar spectral energy distribution to make these objects appear extreme in their near infrared and mid infrared colors. One object in our sample, HV 915, a known post asymptotic giant branch star of the RV Tau type exhibits CO 2.3 micron band head emission consistent with previous work that demonstrates the object has a circumstellar disk.
  • Infrared spectra of carbon-rich objects which have evolved off the asymptotic giant branch reveal a range of dust properties, including fullerenes, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), aliphatic hydrocarbons, and several unidentified features, including the 21 um emission feature. To test for the presence of fullerenes, we used the position and width of the feature at 18.7-18.9 um and examined other features at 17.4 and 6-9 um. This method adds three new fullerene sources to the known sample, but it also calls into question three previous identifications. We confirm that the strong 11 um features seen in some sources arise primarily from SiC, which may exist as a coating around carbonaceous cores and result from photo-processing. Spectra showing the 21 um feature usually show the newly defined Class D PAH profile at 7-9 um. These spectra exhibit unusual PAH profiles at 11-14 um, with weak contributions at 12.7 um, which we define as Class D1, or show features shifted to ~11.4, 12.4, and 13.2 um, which we define as Class D2. Alkyne hydrocarbons match the 15.8 um feature associated with 21 um emission. Sources showing fullerene emission but no PAHs have blue colors in the optical, suggesting a clear line of sight to the central source. Spectra with 21 um features and Class D2 PAH emission also show photometric evidence for a relatively clear line of sight to the central source. The multiple associations of the 21 um feature to aliphatic hydrocarbons suggest that the carrier is related to this material in some way.
  • We present the classification of 197 point sources observed with the Infrared Spectrograph in the SAGE-Spec Legacy program on the Spitzer Space Telescope. We introduce a decision-tree method of object classification based on infrared spectral features, continuum and spectral energy distribution shape, bolometric luminosity, cluster membership, and variability information, which is used to classify the SAGE-Spec sample of point sources. The decision tree has a broad application to mid-infrared spectroscopic surveys, where supporting photometry and variability information are available. We use these classifications to make deductions about the stellar populations of the Large Magellanic Cloud and the success of photometric classification methods. We find 90 asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars, 29 young stellar objects, 23 post-AGB objects, 19 red supergiants, eight stellar photospheres, seven background galaxies, seven planetary nebulae, two HII regions and 12 other objects, seven of which remain unclassified.
  • We present a 2Dust model for the dust shell around a LMC long-period variable (LPV) previously studied as part of the OGLE survey. OGLE LMC LPV 28579 (SAGE J051306.40-690946.3) is a carbon-rich asymptotic giant branch (AGB) star for which we have photometry and spectra from the Spitzer SAGE and SAGE-Spec programs along with UBVIJHK_s photometry. By modeling this source, we obtain a baseline set of dust properties to be used in the construction of a grid of models for carbon stars. We reproduce its spectral energy distribution using a mixture of AmC and SiC (15% by mass). The grain sizes are distributed according to the KMH model. The best-fit model has an optical depth of 0.28 for the shell at the peak of the SiC feature, with R_in~1430 R_sun or 4.4 R_star. The temperature at this inner radius is 1310 K. Assuming an expansion velocity of 10 km s^-1, we obtain a dust mass-loss rate of 2.5x10^-9 M_sun yr-1. We calculate a 15% variation in this rate by testing the fit sensitivity against variation in input parameters. We also present a simple model for the molecular gas in the extended atmosphere that could give rise to the 13.7 \mu m feature seen in the spectrum. We find that a combination of CO and C_2H_2 gas at an excitation temperature of about 1000 K and column densities of 3x10^21 cm^-2 and 10^19 cm^-2 respectively are able to reproduce the observations. Given that the excitation temperature is close to T_dust(R_in), most of the molecular contribution probably arises from the inner shell region. The luminosity corresponding to the first epoch of SAGE observations is 6580 L_sun. For an effective temperature of about 3000 K, this implies a stellar mass of 1.5-2 M_sun and an age of 1-2.5 Gyr. For a gas:dust ratio of 200, we obtain a gas mass-loss rate of 5.0x10^-7 M_sun yr^-1, consistent with the gas mass-loss rates estimated from the period, color and 8 \mu m flux of the source.
  • The SAGE-Spec Spitzer Legacy program is a spectroscopic follow-up to the SAGE-LMC photometric survey of the Large Magellanic Cloud carried out with the Spitzer Space Telescope. We present an overview of SAGE-Spec and some of its first results. The SAGE-Spec program aims to study the life cycle of gas and dust in the Large Magellanic Cloud, and to provide information essential to the classification of the point sources observed in the earlier SAGE-LMC photometric survey. We acquired 224.6 hours of observations using the InfraRed Spectrograph and the SED mode of the Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer. The SAGE-Spec data, along with archival Spitzer spectroscopy of objects in the Large Magellanic Cloud, are reduced and delivered to the community. We discuss the observing strategy, the specific data reduction pipelines applied and the dissemination of data products to the scientific community. Initial science results include the first detection of an extragalactic "21 um" feature towards an evolved star and elucidation of the nature of disks around RV Tauri stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud. Towards some young stars, ice features are observed in absorption. We also serendipitously observed a background quasar, at a redshift of z~0.14, which appears to be host-less.
  • The "Frankfurter Neutronenquelle am Stern-Gerlach-Zentrum" (FRANZ), which is currently under development, will be the strongest neutron source in the astrophysically interesting energy region in the world. It will be about three orders of magnitude more intense than the well-established neutron source at the Research Center Karlsruhe (FZK).
  • Spitzer MIPS 24 um images were obtained for 36 Galactic planetary nebulae (PNe) whose central stars are hot white dwarfs (WDs) or pre-WDs with effective temperatures of ~100,000 K or higher. Diffuse 24 um emission is detected in 28 of these PNe. The eight non-detections are angularly large PNe with very low H-alpha surface brightnesses. We find three types of correspondence between the 24 um emission and H-alpha line emission of these PNe: six show 24 um emission more extended than H-alpha emission, nine have a similar extent at 24 um and H-alpha, and 13 show diffuse 24 um emission near the center of the H-alpha shell. The sizes and surface brightnesses of these three groups of PNe and the non-detections suggest an evolutionary sequence, with the youngest ones being brightest and the most evolved ones undetected. The 24 um band emission from these PNe is attributed to [O IV] 25.9 um and [Ne V] 24.3 um line emission and dust continuum emission, but the relative contributions of these three components depend on the temperature of the central star and the distribution of gas and dust in the nebula.
  • We present diffraction limited, 10um imaging polarimetry data for the central regions of the archetypal Seyfert AGN, NGC1068. The position angle of polarization is consistent with three dominant polarizing mechanisms. We identify three distinct regions of polarization: (a) north of the nucleus, arising from aligned dust in the NLR, (b) south, east and west of the nucleus, consistent with dust being channeled toward the central engine and (c) a central minimum of polarization consistent with a compact (<22pc) torus. These observations provide continuity between the geometrically and optically thick torus and the host galaxy's nuclear environments. These images represent the first published mid-IR polarimetry from an 8-m class telescope and illustrate the potential of such observations.
  • Molecular oxygen, O2 has been expected historically to be an abundant component of the chemical species in molecular clouds and, as such, an important coolant of the dense interstellar medium. However, a number of attempts from both ground and from space have failed to detect O2 emission. The work described here uses heterodyne spectroscopy from space to search for molecular oxygen in the interstellar medium. The Odin satellite carries a 1.1 m sub-millimeter dish and a dedicated 119 GHz receiver for the ground state line of O2. Starting in 2002, the star forming molecular cloud core rho Oph A was observed with Odin for 34 days during several observing runs. We detect a spectral line at v(LSR) = 3.5 km/s with dv(FWHM) = 1.5 km/s, parameters which are also common to other species associated with rho Ohp A. This feature is identified as the O2 (N_J = 1_1 - 1_0) transition at 118 750.343 MHz. The abundance of molecular oxygen, relative to H2,, is 5E-8 averaged over the Odin beam. This abundance is consistently lower than previously reported upper limits.
  • We have mapped [Ne II] (12.8um) and [S IV] (10.5um) emission from W51 IRS 2 with TEXES on Gemini North, and we compare these data to VLA free-free observations and VLT near-infrared images. With 0.5" spatial and 4 km/s spectral resolution we are able to separate the ionized gas into several components: an extended H II region on the front surface of the molecular cloud, several embedded compact H II regions, and a streamer of high velocity gas. We interpret the high velocity streamer as a precessing or fan-like jet, which has emerged from the molecular cloud into an OB star cluster where it is being ionized.
  • Color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) are presented for the Spitzer SAGE (Surveying the Agents of a Galaxy's Evolution) survey of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). IRAC and MIPS 24 um epoch one data are presented. These data represent the deepest, widest mid-infrared CMDs of their kind ever produced in the LMC. Combined with the 2MASS survey, the diagrams are used to delineate the evolved stellar populations in the Large Magellanic Cloud as well as Galactic foreground and extragalactic background populations. Some 32000 evolved stars brighter than the tip of the red giant branch are identified. Of these, approximately 17500 are classified as oxygen-rich, 7000 carbon-rich, and another 1200 as ``extreme'' asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars. Brighter members of the latter group have been called ``obscured'' AGB stars in the literature owing to their dusty circumstellar envelopes. A large number (1200) of luminous oxygen--rich AGB stars/M supergiants are also identified. Finally, there is strong evidence from the 24 um MIPS channel that previously unexplored, lower luminosity oxygen-rich AGB stars contribute significantly to the mass loss budget of the LMC (1200 such sources are identified).
  • The bright GRB 050408 was localized by HETE-II near local midnight, enabling an impressive ground-based followup effort as well as space-based followup from Swift. The Swift data from the X-Ray Telescope (XRT) and our own optical photometry and spectrum of the afterglow provide the cornerstone for our analysis. Under the traditional assumption that the visible waveband was above the peak synchrotron frequency and below the cooling frequency, the optical photometry from 0.03 to 5.03 days show an afterglow decay corresponding to an electron energy index of p_lc = 2.05 +/- 0.04, without a jet break as suggested by others. A break is seen in the X-ray data at early times (at ~12600 sec after the GRB). The spectral slope of the optical spectrum is consistent with p_lc assuming a host-galaxy extinction of A_V = 1.18 mag. The optical-NIR broadband spectrum is also consistent with p = 2.05, but prefers A_V = 0.57 mag. The X-ray afterglow shows a break at 1.26 x 10^4 sec, which may be the result of a refreshed shock. This burst stands out in that the optical and X-ray data suggest a large H I column density of N_HI ~ 10^22 cm^-2; it is very likely a damped Lyman alpha system and so the faintness of the host galaxy (M_V > -18 mag) is noteworthy. Moreover, we detect extraordinarily strong Ti II absorption lines with a column density through the GRB host that exceeds the largest values observed for the Milky Way by an order of magnitude. Furthermore, the Ti II equivalent width is in the top 1% of Mg II absorption-selected QSOs. This suggests that the large-scale environment of GRB 050408 has significantly lower Ti depletion than the Milky Way and a large velocity width (delta v > 200 km/s).
  • We present Odin observations of the AGB star W Hya in the ground-state transition of ortho-H2O, 1(10)-1(01), at 557GHz. The line is clearly of circumstellar origin. Radiative transfer modelling of the water lines observed by Odin and ISO results in a mass-loss rate of (2.5 +/- 0.5)E-7 Msol/yr, and a circumstellar H2O abundance of (2.0 +/- 1.0)E-3. The inferred mass-loss rate is consistent with that obtained from modelling the circumstellar CO radio line emission, and also with that obtained from the dust emission modelling combined with a dynamical model for the outflow. The very high water abundance, higher than the cosmic oxygen abundance, can be explained by invoking an injection of excess water from evaporating icy bodies in the system. The required extra mass of water is quite small, on the order of ~ 0.1 earth mass.
  • Ever since the pioneering study of Spitzer, it has been widely recognized that grains play an important role in the heating and cooling of photo-ionized environments. A detailed code is necessary to model grains in a photo-ionized medium. In this paper we will use the spectral synthesis code Cloudy for this purpose. The grain model of this code has recently undergone a comprehensive upgrade. Part of this is the newly developed hybrid grain charge model, which will be described in detail. This model allows discrete charge states of very small grains to be modelled accurately while simultaneously avoiding the overhead of fully resolving the charge distribution of large grains, thus making the model both accurate and computationally efficient. A comprehensive comparison with the fully resolved charge state models of Weingartner & Draine (2001) shows that the agreement is very satisfactory for realistic size distributions. The effect of the grain size distribution on the line emission from photo-ionized regions is studied by taking standard models for an H II region and a planetary nebula and adding a dust component to the models with varying grain size distributions. A comparison of the models shows that varying the size distribution has a dramatic effect on the emitted spectrum, and affects the ionization balance as well. These results clearly demonstrate that the grain size distribution is an important parameter in photo-ionization models.
  • In this paper we present results obtained with the new grain code in Cloudy which underline the strong effect of photo-electric heating by grains in photo-ionized regions. We study the effect that the distribution of grain sizes has on the magnitude of the effect, and show that this effect is nothing short of dramatic. This makes the grain size distribution an important parameter in modeling of photo-ionized regions such as H II regions and planetary nebulae.
  • Odin has successfully observed the molecular core rho Oph A in the 572.5 GHz rotational ground state line of ammonia, NH3 (J,K = 1,0 - 0,0). The interpretation of this result makes use of complementary molecular line data obtained from the ground (C17O and CH3OH) as part of the Odin preparatory work. Comparison of these observations with theoretical model calculations of line excitation and transfer yields a quite ordinary abundance of methanol, X(CH3OH) = 3e-9. Unless NH3 is not entirely segregated from C17O and CH3OH, ammonia is found to be significantly underabundant with respect to typical dense core values, viz. X(NH3) = 8e-10.
  • We have mapped the submillimeter emission from the 1(10)-1(01) transition of ortho-water in the W3 star-forming region. A 5'x5' map of the W3 IRS4 and W3 IRS5 region reveals strong water lines at half the positions in the map. The relative strength of the Odin lines compared to previous observations by SWAS suggests that we are seeing water emission from an extended region. Across much of the map the lines are double-peaked, with an absorption feature at -39 km/s; however, some positions in the map show a single strong line at -43 km/s. We interpret the double-peaked lines as arising from optically thick, self-absorbed water emission near the W3 IRS5, while the narrower blue-shifted lines originate in emission near W3 IRS4. In this model, the unusual appearance of the spectral lines across the map results from a coincidental agreement in velocity between the emission near W3 IRS4 and the blue peak of the more complex lines near W3 IRS5. The strength of the water lines near W3 IRS4 suggests we may be seeing water emission enhanced in a photon-dominated region.