• We use data from the Radial Velocity Experiment (RAVE) and the Tycho-Gaia astrometric solution catalogue (TGAS) to compute the velocity fields yielded by the radial (VR), azimuthal (Vphi) and vertical (Vz) components of associated Galactocentric velocity. We search in particular for variation in all three velocity components with distance above and below the disc midplane, as well as how each component of Vz (line-of-sight and tangential velocity projections) modifies the obtained vertical structure. To study the dependence of velocity on proper motion and distance we use two main samples: a RAVE sample including proper motions from the Tycho-2, PPMXL and UCAC4 catalogues, and a RAVE-TGAS sample with inferred distances and proper motions from the TGAS and UCAC5 catalogues. In both samples, we identify asymmetries in VR and Vz. Below the plane we find the largest radial gradient to be dVR / dR = -7.01+- 0.61 km\s kpc, in agreement with recent studies. Above the plane we find a similar gradient with dVR / dR= -9.42+- 1.77 km\s kpc. By comparing our results with previous studies, we find that the structure in Vz is strongly dependent on the adopted proper motions. Using the Galaxia Milky Way model, we demonstrate that distance uncertainties can create artificial wave-like patterns. In contrast to previous suggestions of a breathing mode seen in RAVE data, our results support a combination of bending and breathing modes, likely generated by a combination of external or internal and external mechanisms.
  • We present a new HI modelling tool called \textsc{Galactus}. The program has been designed to perform automated fits of disc-galaxy models to observations. It includes a treatment for the self-absorption of the gas. The software has been released into the public domain. We describe the design philosophy and inner workings of the program. After this, we model the face-on galaxy NGC2403, using both self-absorption and optically thin models, showing that self-absorption occurs even in face-on galaxies. It is shown that the maximum surface brightness plateaus seen in Paper I of this series are indeed signs of self-absorption. The apparent HI mass of an edge-on galaxy can be drastically lower compared to that same galaxy seen face-on. The Tully-Fisher relation is found to be relatively free from self-absorption issues.
  • We present a new strategy for fitting the structure and kinematics of the HI in edge-on galaxies using a fit to the terminal-velocity channel maps of a HI data cube. The strategy can deal with self-absorbing HI gas and the presence of warps. The method is first tested on a series of models. We demonstrate that fitting optically thin models to real galaxies will lead to an overestimation of the thickness and velocity dispersion, and to a serious underestimation of the HI face-on column densities. We subsequently fit both self-absorption and optically thin models to the HI data of six edge-on galaxies. In three of these we have also measured the velocity dispersion. On average 27 \pm 6 % of the total HI mass of edge-on galaxies is hidden by self-absorption. This implies that the HI mass, thickness and velocity dispersion of galaxies is typically underestimated in the literature.
  • We present optical and near-infrared archival observations of eight edge-on galaxies. These observations are used to model the stellar content of each galaxy using the FitSKIRT software package. Using FitSKIRT, we can self-consistently model a galaxy in each band simultaneously while treating for dust. This allows us to accurately measure both the scale length and scale height of the stellar disc, plus the shape parameters of the bulge. By combining this data with the previously reported integrated magnitudes of each galaxy, we can infer their true luminosities. We have successfully modelled seven out of the eight galaxies in our sample. We find that stellar discs can be modelled correctly, but have not been able to model the stellar bulge reliably. Our sample consists for the most part of slow rotating galaxies, and we find that the average dust layer is much thicker than what is reported for faster rotating galaxies.
  • The age-metallicity relation (AMR) is a fundamental observational constraint for understanding how the Galactic disc formed and evolved chemically in time. However, there is not yet an agreement on the observational properties of the AMR for the solar neighbourhood, primarily due to the difficulty in obtaining accurate stellar ages for individual field stars. We have started an observational campaign for providing the much needed observational input by using wide white dwarf-main sequence (WDMS) binaries. White dwarfs are natural clocks and can be used to derive accurate ages. Metallicities can be obtained from the main sequence companions. Since the progenitors of white dwarfs and the main sequence stars were born at the same time, WDMS binaries provide a unique opportunity to observationally constrain in a robust way the properties of the AMR. In this work we present the AMR derived from analysing a pilot sample of 23 WDMS binaries and provide clear observational evidence for the lack of correlation between age and metallicity at young and intermediate ages (0-7 Gyrs).
  • We present neutral hydrogen observations for a sample of eight nearby, late-type, edge-on galaxies. All of the galaxies have been well resolved in the radial direction, while six have also been well resolved in the vertical direction. We find that each of the galaxies has approximately the same maximum surface brightness temperature throughout its disc. We argue that self-absorption is the main cause of this phenomenon and that subsequent decompositions will require a treatment of this.
  • In the previous papers in this series, we have measured the stellar and \hi content in a sample of edge-on galaxies. In the present paper, we perform a simultaneous rotation curve and vertical force field gradient decomposition for five of these edge-on galaxies. The rotation curve decomposition provides a measure of the radial dark matter potential, while the vertical force field gradient provide a measure of the vertical dark matter potential. We fit dark matter halo models to these potentials. Using our \hi self-absorption results, we find that a typical dark matter halo has a less dense core ($0.094\pm0.230$\,M$_\odot$/pc$^3$) compared to an optically thin \hi model ($0.150\pm0.124$\,M$_\odot$/pc$^3$). The HI self-absorption dark matter halo has a longer scale length $R_c$ of $1.42\pm 3.48$\,kpc, versus $1.10\pm 1.81$\,kpc for the optically thin HI model. The median halo shape is spherical, at $q=1.0\pm0.6$ (self-absorbing \hi), while it is prolate at $q=1.5\pm0.6$ for the optically thin. Our best results were obtained for ESO\,274-G001 and UGC\,7321, for which we were able to measure the velocity dispersion in Paper III. These two galaxies have drastically different halo shapes, with one oblate and one strongly prolate. Overall, we find that the many assumptions required make this type of analysis susceptible to errors.
  • The GALAH survey is a large high-resolution spectroscopic survey using the newly commissioned HERMES spectrograph on the Anglo-Australian Telescope. The HERMES spectrograph provides high-resolution (R ~28,000) spectra in four passbands for 392 stars simultaneously over a 2 degree field of view. The goal of the survey is to unravel the formation and evolutionary history of the Milky Way, using fossil remnants of ancient star formation events which have been disrupted and are now dispersed throughout the Galaxy. Chemical tagging seeks to identify such dispersed remnants solely from their common and unique chemical signatures; these groups are unidentifiable from their spatial, photometric or kinematic properties. To carry out chemical tagging, the GALAH survey will acquire spectra for a million stars down to V~14. The HERMES spectra of FGK stars contain absorption lines from 29 elements including light proton-capture elements, alpha-elements, odd-Z elements, iron-peak elements and n-capture elements from the light and heavy s-process and the r-process. This paper describes the motivation and planned execution of the GALAH survey, and presents some results on the first-light performance of HERMES.
  • Using the RAdial Velocity Experiment fourth data release (RAVE DR4), and a new metallicity calibration that will be also taken into account in the future RAVE DR5, we investigate the existence and the properties of super-solar metallicity stars ([M/H] > +0.1 dex) in the sample, and in particular in the Solar neighbourhood. We find that RAVE is rich in super-solar metallicity stars, and that the local metallicity distribution function declines remarkably slowly up to +0.4 dex. Our results show that the kinematics and height distributions of the super-solar metallicity stars are identical to those of the [M/H] < 0 thin-disc giants that we presume were locally manufactured. The eccentricities of the super-solar metallicity stars indicate that half of them are on a roughly circular orbit (e < 0.15), so under the assumption that the metallicity of the interstellar medium at a given radius never decreases with time, they must have increased their angular momenta by scattering at corotation resonances of spiral arms from regions far inside the Solar annulus. The likelihood that a star will migrate radially does not seem to decrease significantly with increasing amplitude of vertical oscillations within range of oscillation amplitudes encountered in the disc.
  • We provide APASS photometry in the Landolt BV and Sloan g'r'i' bands for all the 425,743 stars included in the latest 4th RAVE Data Release. The internal accuracy of the APASS photometry of RAVE stars, expressed as error of the mean of data obtained and separately calibrated over a median of 4 distinct observing epochs and distributed between 2009 and 2013, is 0.013, 0.012, 0.012, 0.014 and 0.021 mag for B, V, g', r' and i' band, respectively. The equally high external accuracy of APASS photometry has been verified on secondary Landolt and Sloan photometric standard stars not involved in the APASS calibration process, and on a large body of literature data on field and cluster stars, confirming the absence of offsets and trends. Compared with the Carlsberg Meridian Catalog (CMC-15), APASS astrometry of RAVE stars is accurate to a median value of 0.098 arcsec. Brightness distribution functions for the RAVE stars have been derived in all bands. APASS photometry of RAVE stars, augmented by 2MASS JHK infrared data, has been chi2 fitted to a densely populated synthetic photometric library designed to widely explore in temperature, surface gravity, metallicity and reddening. Resulting Teff and E(B-V), computed over a range of options, are provided and discussed, and will be kept updated in response to future APASS and RAVE data releases. In the process it is found that the reddening caused by an homogeneous slab of dust, extending for 140 pc on either side of the Galactic plane and responsible for E(B-V,poles)=0.036 +/- 0.002 at the galactic poles, is a suitable approximation of the actual reddening encountered at Galactic latitudes |b|>=25 deg.
  • We present a study of the chemical abundances of Solar neighbourhood stars associated to dynamical structures in the Milky Way's (thick) disk. These stars were identified as overdensity in the eccentricity range 0.3< ecc < 0.5 in the Copenhagen-Geneva Survey by Helmi et al. (2006). We find that the stars with these dynamical characteristics do not constitute a homogeneous population. A relatively sharp transition in dynamical and chemical properties appears to occur at a metallicity of [Fe/H] ~ -0.4. Stars with [Fe/H] > -0.4 have mostly lower eccentricities, smaller vertical velocity dispersions, are alpha-enhanced and define a rather narrow sequence in [alpha/Fe] vs [Fe/H], clearly distinct from that of the thin disk. Stars with [Fe/H] < -0.4 have a range of eccentricities, are hotter vertically, and depict a larger spread in [alpha/Fe]. We have also found tentative evidence of substructure possibly associated to the disruption of a metal-rich star cluster. The differences between these populations of stars is also present in e.g. [Zn/Fe], [Ni/Fe] and [SmII/Fe], suggesting a real physical distinction.
  • By selecting in the RAVE-DR4 survey the stars located between 1 and 2 kpc above the Galactic plane, we question the consistency of the simplest three-component model (thin disc, thick disc, halo) for the Milky Way. We confirm that the metallicity and azimuthal velocity distribution functions of the thick disc are not Gaussian. In particular, we find that the thick disc has an extended metallicity tail going at least down to [M/H]=-2 dex, contributing roughly at 3% of the entire thick disc population and having a shorter scale-length compared to the canonical thick disc. The mean azimuthal velocity of these metal-poor stars allows us to estimate the correlation between the metallicity and the orbital velocity, which is an important constraint on the formation mechanisms of the Galactic thick disc. Given our simple approach, we find dVphi/d[M/H] ~ 50 km/s/dex, which is in a very good agreement with previous literature values. We complete the study with a brief discussion on the implications of the formation scenarios for the thick disc, and suggest that given the above mentioned characteristics, a thick disc mainly formed by radial migration mechanisms seems unlikely.
  • We investigate the diffuse light in the outer regions of the nearby elliptical galaxy M87 in the Virgo cluster, using planetary nebulas (PNs) as tracers. The surveyed areas (0.43 squared degrees) cover M87 up to a radial distance of 150 kpc, in the ransition region between galaxy halo and intracluster light (ICL). All PNs are identified through the on-off band technique using automatic selection criteria based on the distribution of the detected sources in the colour-magnitude diagram and the properties of their point-spread function. We extract a catalogue of 688 objects down to m_5007=28.4, with an estimated residual contamination from foreground stars and background Lyalpha galaxies, which amounts to ~35% of the sample. This is one of the largest extragalactic PN samples in number of candidates, magnitude depth, and radial extent, which allows us to carry out an unprecedented photometric study of the PN population in the outer regions of M87. We find that the logarithmic density profile of the PN distribution is shallower than the surface brightness profile at large radii. This behaviour is consistent with the superposition of two components associated with the halo of M87 and with the ICL, which have different luminosity specific PN numbers, the ICL contributing three times more PNs per unit light. Because of the depth of this survey we are also able to study the shape of the PN luminosity function (PNLF) in the outer regions of M87. We find a slope for the PNLF that is steeper at fainter magnitudes than the standard analytical PNLF formula and adopt a generalised model that treats the slope as a free parameter. Comparing the PNLF of M87 and the M31 bulge, both normalised by the sampled luminosity, the M87 PNLF contains fewer bright PNs and has a steeper slope towards fainter magnitudes.
  • Why do some discoveries, which appear in hindsight to be obviously major discoveries, have so little impact when they were made. These are discoveries that were ahead of their time, but for some reason the scientific community was not ready to absorb them. I got interested in Slipher after learning that by 1914 he had observed nebular redshifts up to 1000 km/s. Why did this not convince people at the time that the nebulae were extragalactic ? Was this another example, like Zwicky's (1933) discovery of dark matter in the Coma cluster, of a discovery which was too far ahead of its time ? I conclude that Slipher's situation was different from Zwicky's. The significance of Slipher's nebular redshifts was partly recognised at the time, but I believe that its full significance was masked by van Maanen's work which turned out to be erroneous and reduced the impact of Slipher's discoveries.
  • We have conducted an HI 21 cm emission-line survey of six loose groups of galaxies chosen to be analogs to the Local Group. The survey was conducted using the Parkes Multibeam instrument and the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) over a ~1 Mpc^2 area and covering the full depth of each group, with a M(HI) sensitivity of ~7x10^5 M(sun). Our survey detected 110 sources, 61 of which are associated with the six groups. All of these sources were confirmed with ATCA observations or were previously cataloged by HIPASS. The sources all have optical counterparts and properties consistent with dwarf irregular or late-type spiral galaxies. We present here the HI properties of the groups and their galaxies. We derive an HI mass function for the groups that is consistent with being flatter than the equivalent field HIMF. We also derive a circular velocity distribution function, tracing the luminous dark matter halos in the groups, that is consistent with those of the Local Group and HIPASS galaxies, both of which are shallower than that of clusters or predictions from CDM models of galaxy formation.
  • We present chemical elemental abundances for $36,561$ stars observed by the RAdial Velocity Experiment (RAVE), an ambitious spectroscopic survey of our Galaxy at Galactic latitudes $|$b$|>25^{\circ}$ and with magnitudes in the range 9$<I_{DENIS}<$13. RAVE spectra cover the Ca-triplet region at 8410--8795\AA\ with resolving power R$\sim$7500. This first data release of the RAVE chemical catalogue is complementary to the third RAVE data release of radial velocities and stellar parameters, and it contains chemical abundances for the elements Mg, Al, Si, Ca, Ti, Fe and Ni, with a mean error of $\sim$0.2 dex, as judged from accuracy tests performed on synthetic and real spectra. Abundances are estimated through a dedicated processing pipeline in which the curve of growth of individual lines is obtained from a library of absorption-line equivalent widths to construct a model spectrum that is then matched to the observed spectrum via a $\chi^2$-minimization technique. We plan to extend this pipeline to include estimates for other elements, such as oxygen and sulfur, in future data releases.
  • We apply the method of Burnett & Binney (2010) for the determination of stellar distances and parameters to the internal catalogue of the Radial Velocity Experiment (Steinmetz et al. 2006). Subsamples of stars that either have Hipparcos parallaxes or belong to well-studied clusters, inspire confidence in the formal errors. Distances to dwarfs cooler than ~6000 K appear to be unbiased, but those to hotter dwarfs tend to be too small by ~10% of the formal errors. Distances to giants tend to be too large by about the same amount. The median distance error in the whole sample of 216,000 stars is 28% and the error distribution is similar for both giants and dwarfs. Roughly half the stars in the RAVE survey are giants. The giant fraction is largest at low latitudes and in directions towards the Galactic Centre. Near the plane the metallicity distribution is remarkably narrow and centred on [M/H]-0.04 dex; with increasing |z| it broadens out and its median moves to [M/H] ~ -0.5. Mean age as a function of distance from the Galactic centre and distance |z| from the Galactic plane shows the anticipated increase in mean age with |z|.
  • We present the third data release of the RAdial Velocity Experiment (RAVE) which is the first milestone of the RAVE project, releasing the full pilot survey. The catalog contains 83,072 radial velocity measurements for 77,461 stars in the southern celestial hemisphere, as well as stellar parameters for 39,833 stars. This paper describes the content of the new release, the new processing pipeline, as well as an updated calibration for the metallicity based upon the observation of additional standard stars. Spectra will be made available in a future release. The data release can be accessed via the RAVE webpage: http://www.rave-survey.org.
  • The existence of a kinematically defined moving group of stars centred at U = -40, V = -17 km/s referred to as the Hyades Supercluster, has been suggested as the debris of an originally large star forming event, with its core being the present day Hyades open cluster. Using high-resolution UVES spectra, we present elemental abundances for a range of alpha, Fe-peak and neutron-capture elements for 26 proposed supercluster stars. Our results show that the sample stars display a heterogeneous abundance distribution, with a clump around [Fe/H] = +0.15. We also calculate stellar radial velocities and U,V,W space velocities. Enforcing a strict chemical and kinematical membership criteria, we find 4 supercluster stars share the Hyades open cluster abundances and kinematics, while many of the remaining stars fit the disc field kinematics and abundance range. We discuss our findings in the context of the Hyades supercluster being a dispersed star-forming remnant, a stellar stream of purely dynamical origin or a result of several processes.
  • The formation and evolution of galactic disks is particularly important for understanding how galaxies form and evolve, and the cause of the variety in which they appear to us. Ongoing large surveys, made possible by new instrumentation at wavelengths from the ultraviolet (GALEX), via optical (HST and large groundbased telescopes) and infrared (Spitzer) to the radio are providing much new information about disk galaxies over a wide range of redshift. Although progress has been made, the dynamics and structure of stellar disks, including their truncations, are still not well understood. We do now have plausible estimates of disk mass-to-light ratios, and estimates of Toomre's $Q$ parameter show that they are just locally stable. Disks are mostly very flat and sometimes very thin, and have a range in surface brightness from canonical disks with a central surface brightness of about 21.5 $B$-mag arcsec$^{-2}$ down to very low surface brightnesses. It appears that galaxy disks are not maximal, except possibly in the largest systems. Their HI layers display warps whenever HI can be detected beyond the stellar disk, with low-level star formation going on out to large radii. Stellar disks display abundance gradients which flatten at larger radii and sometimes even reverse. The existence of a well-defined baryonic Tully-Fisher relation hints at an approximately uniform baryonic to dark matter ratio. Thick disks are common in disk galaxies and their existence appears unrelated to the presence of a bulge component; they are old, but their formation is not yet understood. Disk formation was already advanced at redshifts of $\sim 2$, but at that epoch disks were not yet quiescent and in full rotational equilibrium. Downsizing is now well-established. The formation and history of star formation in S0s is still not fully understood.
  • Using data from our Parkes & ATCA HI survey of six groups analogous to the Local Group, we find that the HI mass function and velocity distribution function for loose groups are the same as those for the Local Group. Both mass functions confirm that the "missing satellite" problem exists in other galaxy groups.
  • Using a sample of 213,713 stars from the Radial Velocity Experiment (RAVE) survey, limited to a distance of 2 kpc from the Sun and to |z|<1 kpc, we report the detection of a velocity gradient of disc stars in the fourth quadrant, directed radially from the Galactic centre. In the direction of the Galactic centre, we apply a simple method independent of stellar proper motions and of Galactic parameters to assess the existence of this gradient in the RAVE data. This velocity gradient corresponds to |K+C| < 3 km/s/kpc, where K and C are the Oort constants measuring the local divergence and radial shear of the velocity field, respectively. In order to illustrate the effect, assuming a zero radial velocity of the Local Standard of Rest we then reconstruct the two-dimensional Galactocentric velocity maps using two different sets of proper motions and photometric distances based either on isochrone fitting or on K-band magnitudes, and considering two sets of values for the Galactocentric radius of the Sun and local circular speed. Further observational confirmation of our finding with line-of-sight velocities of stars at low latitudes, together with further modelling, should help constrain the non-axisymmetric components of the Galactic potential, including the bar, the spiral arms and possibly the ellipticity of the dark halo.
  • As part of our current programme to test LCDM predictions for dark matter (DM) haloes using extended kinematical observations of early-type galaxies, we present a dynamical analysis of the bright elliptical galaxy NGC 4374 (M84) based on ~450 Planetary Nebulae (PNe) velocities from the PN.Spectrograph, along with extended long-slit stellar kinematics. This is the first such analysis of a galaxy from our survey with a radially constant velocity dispersion profile. We find that the spatial and kinematical distributions of the PNe agree with the field stars in the region of overlap. The velocity kurtosis is consistent with zero at almost all radii. We construct a series of Jeans models, fitting both velocity dispersion and kurtosis to help break the mass-anisotropy degeneracy. Our mass models include DM halos either with shallow cores or with central cusps as predicted by cosmological simulations - along with the novel introduction in this context of adiabatic halo contraction from baryon infall. Both classes of models confirm a very massive dark halo around NGC 4374, demonstrating that PN kinematics data are well able to detect such haloes when present. Considering the default cosmological mass model, we confirm earlier suggestions that bright galaxies tend to have halo concentrations higher than LCDM predictions, but this is found to be solved if either a Salpeter IMF or adiabatic contraction with a Kroupa IMF is assumed. Thus for the first time a case is found where the PN dynamics may well be consistent with a standard dark matter halo. A cored halo can also fit the data, and prefers a stellar mass consistent with a Salpeter IMF. The less dramatic dark matter content found in lower-luminosity "ordinary" ellipticals suggests a bimodality in the halo properties which may be produced by divergent baryonic effects during their assembly histories.
  • We study the eccentricity distribution of a thick disc sample of stars observed in the Radial Velocity Experiment (RAVE) and compare it to that expected in four simulations of thick disc formation in the literature (accretion of satellites, heating of a primordial thin disc during a merger, radial migration, and gas-rich mergers), as compiled by Sales et al. (2009). We find that the distribution of our sample is peaked at low eccentricities and falls off smoothly and rather steeply to high eccentricities. This distribution is fairly robust to changes in distances, thin disc contamination, and the particular thick disc sample used. Our results are inconsistent with what is expected for the pure accretion simulation, since we find that the dynamics of local thick disc stars implies that the majority must have formed "in situ". Of the remaining models explored, the eccentricity distribution of our stars appears to be most consistent with the gas-rich merger case.
  • We report on the discovery of new members of nearby young moving groups, exploiting the full power of combining the RAVE survey with several stellar age diagnostic methods and follow-up high-resolution optical spectroscopy. The results include the identification of one new and five likely members of the beta Pictoris moving group, ranging from spectral types F9 to M4 with the majority being M dwarfs, one K7 likely member of the epsilon Cha group and two stars in the Tuc-Hor association. Based on the positive identifications we foreshadow a great potential of the RAVE database in progressing toward a full census of young moving groups in the solar neighbourhood.