• Supernova (SN) Refsdal is the first multiply-imaged, highly-magnified, and spatially-resolved SN ever observed. The SN exploded in a highly-magnified spiral galaxy at z=1.49 behind the Frontier Fields Cluster MACS1149, and provides a unique opportunity to study the environment of SNe at high z. We exploit the time delay between multiple images to determine the properties of the SN and its environment, before, during, and after the SN exploded. We use the integral-field spectrograph MUSE on the VLT to simultaneously target all observed and model-predicted positions of SN Refsdal. We find MgII emission at all positions of SN Refsdal, accompanied by weak FeII* emission at two positions. The measured ratios of [OII] to MgII emission of 10-20 indicate a high degree of ionization with low metallicity. Because the same high degree of ionization is found in all images, and our spatial resolution is too coarse to resolve the region of influence of SN Refsdal, we conclude that this high degree of ionization has been produced by previous SNe or a young and hot stellar population. We find no variability of the [OII] line over a period of 57 days. This suggests that there is no variation in the [OII] luminosity of the SN over this period, or that the SN has a small contribution to the integrated [OII] emission over the scale resolved by our observations.
  • The remarkable progress made in infrared (IR) astronomical instruments over the last 10-15 years has radically changed our vision of the extragalactic IR sky, and overall understanding of galaxy evolution. In particular, this has been the case for the study of active galactic nuclei (AGN), for which IR observations provide a wealth of complementary information that cannot be derived from data in other wavelength regimes. In this review, I summarize the unique contribution that IR astronomy has recently made to our understanding of AGN and their role in galaxy evolution, including both physical studies of AGN at IR wavelengths, and the search for AGN among IR galaxies in general. Finally, I identify and discuss key open issues that it should be possible to address with forthcoming IR telescopes.
  • Galaxy formation models invoke the presence of strong feedback mechanisms that regulate the growth of massive galaxies at high redshifts. In this paper we aim to: (1) confirm spectroscopically the redshifts of a sample of massive galaxies selected with photometric redshifts z > 2.5; (2) investigate the properties of their stellar and interstellar media; (3) detect the presence of outflows, and measure their velocities. To achieve this, we analysed deep, high-resolution (R~2000) FORS2 rest-frame UV spectra for 11 targets. We confirmed that 9 out of 11 have spectroscopic redshifts z > 2.5. We also serendipitously found two mask fillers at redshift z > 2.5, which originally were assigned photometric redshifts 2.0 < z < 2.5. In the four highest-quality spectra we derived outflow velocities by fitting the absorption line profiles with models including multiple dynamical components. We found strongly asymmetric, high-ionisation lines, from which we derived outflow velocities ranging from 480 to 1518 km/s. The two galaxies with highest velocity show signs of AGN. We revised the spectral energy distribution fitting U-band through 8 micron photometry, including the analysis of a power-law component subtraction to identify the possible presence of active galactic nuclei (AGN). The revised stellar masses of all but one of our targets are >1e10 Msun, with four having stellar masses > 5e10 Msun. Three galaxies have a significant power-law component in their spectral energy distributions, which indicates that they host AGN. We conclude that massive galaxies are characterised by significantly higher velocity outflows than the typical Lyman break galaxies at z ~ 3. The incidence of high-velocity outflows (~40% within our sample) is also much higher than among massive galaxies at z < 1, which is consistent with the powerful star formation and nuclear activity that most massive galaxies display at z > 2.
  • We have analysed a sample of 1292 4.5 micron-selected galaxies at z>=3, over 0.6 square degrees of the UKIRT Infrared Deep Survey (UKIDSS) Ultra Deep Survey (UDS). Using photometry from the U band through 4.5 microns, we have obtained photometric redshifts and derived stellar masses for our sources. Only two of our galaxies potentially lie at z>5. We have studied the galaxy stellar mass function at 3<=z<5, based on the 1213 galaxies in our catalogue with [4.5]<= 24.0. We find that: i) the number density of M > 10^11 Msun galaxies increased by a factor > 10 between z=5 and 3, indicating that the assembly rate of these galaxies proceeded > 20 times faster at these redshifts than at 0<z<2; ii) the Schechter function slope alpha is significantly steeper than that displayed by the local stellar mass function, which is both a consequence of the steeper faint end and the absence of a pure exponential decline at the high-mass end; iii) the evolution of the comoving stellar mass density from z=0 to 5 can be modelled as log10 (rho_M) =-(0.05 +/- 0.09) z^2 - (0.22 -/+ 0.32) z + 8.69. At 3<=z<4, more than 30% of the M > 10^11 Msun galaxies would be missed by optical surveys with R<27 or z<26. Thus, our study demonstrates the importance of deep mid-IR surveys over large areas to perform a complete census of massive galaxies at high z and trace the early stages of massive galaxy assembly.
  • We present accurate photometric redshifts in the 2-deg2 COSMOS field. The redshifts are computed with 30 broad, intermediate, and narrow bands covering the UV (GALEX), Visible-NIR (Subaru, CFHT, UKIRT and NOAO) and mid-IR (Spitzer/IRAC). A chi2 template-fitting method (Le Phare) was used and calibrated with large spectroscopic samples from VLT-VIMOS and Keck-DEIMOS. We develop and implement a new method which accounts for the contributions from emission lines (OII, Hbeta, Halpha and Ly) to the spectral energy distributions (SEDs). The treatment of emission lines improves the photo-z accuracy by a factor of 2.5. Comparison of the derived photo-z with 4148 spectroscopic redshifts (i.e. Delta z = zs - zp) indicates a dispersion of sigma_{Delta z/(1+zs)}=0.007 at i<22.5, a factor of 2-6 times more accurate than earlier photo-z in the COSMOS, CFHTLS and COMBO-17 survey fields. At fainter magnitudes i<24 and z<1.25, the accuracy is sigma_{Delta z/(1+zs)}=0.012. The deep NIR and IRAC coverage enables the photo-z to be extended to z~2 albeit with a lower accuracy (sigma_{Delta z/(1+zs)}=0.06 at i~24). The redshift distribution of large magnitude-selected samples is derived and the median redshift is found to range from z=0.66 at 22<i<22.5 to z=1.06 at 24.5<i<25. At i<26.0, the multi-wavelength COSMOS catalog includes approximately 607,617 objects. The COSMOS-30 photo-z enable the full exploitation of this survey for studies of galaxy and large scale structure evolution at high redshift.
  • We present the observed correlations between rest-frame 8, 24, 70 and 160 um monochromatic luminosities and measured total infrared luminosities L_IR of galaxies detected by Spitzer. Our sample consists of 372 star-forming galaxies with individual detections and flux measurements at 8, 24, 70 and 160 um. We have spectroscopic redshifts for 93% of these sources, and accurate photometric redshifts for the remainder. We also used a stacking analysis to measure the IR fluxes of fainter sources at higher redshifts. We show that the monochromatic mid and far-infrared luminosities are strongly correlated with the total infrared luminosity and our stacking analysis confirms that these correlations also hold at higher redshifts. We provide relations between monochromatic luminosities and total infrared luminosities L_IR that should be reliable up to z~2 (z~1.1) for ULIRGs (LIRGs). In particular, we can predict L_IR with accuracies of 37% and 54% from the 8 and 24 um fluxes, while the best tracer is the 70 um flux. Combining bands leads to slightly more accurate estimates. For example, combining the 8 and 24 um luminosities predicts L_IR with an accuracy of 34%. Our results are generally compatible with previous studies, and the small changes are probably due to differences in the sample selection criteria. We can rule out strong evolution in dust properties with redshift up to z~1. Finally, we show that infrared and sub-millimeter observations are complementary means of building complete samples of star-forming galaxies, with the former being more sensitive for z<~2 and the latter at higher z>~2.
  • Because of their unique quality, Hubble Space Telescope (HST) data have played an important complementary role in studies of infrared (IR) galaxies conducted with major facilities, as VLT or Spitzer, and will be as well very valuable for future telescopes as Herschel and ALMA. I review here some of the most recent works led by European astronomers on IR galaxies, and discuss the role that HST has had in the study of different IR galaxy populations. I particularly focus the analysis on the GOODS fields, where the multiwavelength data and unique HST coverage have enabled to jointly put constraints on the evolution of star formation activity and stellar-mass growth with cosmic time.
  • We present the rest-frame 8 micron luminosity function (LF) at redshifts z=1 and ~2, computed from Spitzer 24 micron-selected galaxies in the GOODS fields over an area of 291 sq. arcmin. Using classification criteria based on X-ray data and IRAC colours, we identify the AGN in our sample. The rest-frame 8 micron LF for star-forming galaxies at redshifts z=1 and ~2 have the same shape as at z~0, but with a strong positive luminosity evolution. The number density of star-forming galaxies with log_{10}(nu L_nu(8 micron))>11 increases by a factor >250 from redshift z~0 to 1, and is basically the same at z=1 and ~2. The resulting rest-frame 8 micron luminosity densities associated with star formation at z=1 and ~2 are more than four and two times larger than at z~0, respectively. We also compute the total rest-frame 8 micron LF for star-forming galaxies and AGN at z~2 and show that AGN dominate its bright end, which is well-described by a power-law. Using a new calibration based on Spitzer star-forming galaxies at 0<z<0.6 and validated at higher redshifts through stacking analysis, we compute the bolometric infrared (IR) LF for star-forming galaxies at z=1 and ~2. We find that the respective bolometric IR luminosity densities are (1.2+/-0.2) x 10^9 and (6.6^{+1.2}_{-1.0}) x 10^8 L_sun Mpc^{-3}, in agreement with previous studies within the error bars. At z~2, around 90% of the IR luminosity density associated with star formation is produced by luminous and ultraluminous IR galaxies (LIRG and ULIRG), with the two populations contributing in roughly similar amounts. Finally, we discuss the consistency of our findings with other existing observational results on galaxy evolution.
  • We investigate the role of the luminous infrared galaxy (LIRG) and ultra-luminous infrared galaxy (ULIRG) phases in the evolution of Ks-selected galaxies and, in particular, Extremely Red Galaxies (ERGs). With this aim, we compare the properties of a sample of 2905 Ks<21.5 (Vega mag) galaxies in the GOODS/CDFS with the sub-sample of those 696 sources which are detected at 24 microns. We find that LIRGs constitute 30% of the galaxies with stellar mass M>1x10^{11} Msun assembled at redshift z=0.5. A minimum of 65% of the galaxies with M>2.5x10^{11} Msun at z~2-3 are ULIRGs at those redshifts. 60% of the ULIRGs in our sample have the characteristic colours of ERGs. Conversely, 40% of the ERGs with stellar mass M>1.3x10^{11} Msun at 1.5<z<2.0 and a minimum of 52% of those with the same mass cut at 2.0<z<3.0 are ULIRGs. The average optical/near-IR properties of the massive ERGs at similar redshifts that are identified with ULIRGs and that are not have basically no difference, suggesting that both populations contain the same kind of objects in different phases of their lives. LIRGs and ULIRGs have an important role in galaxy evolution and mass assembly, and, although they are only able to trace a fraction of the massive (M>1x10^{11} Msun) galaxies present in the Universe at a given time, this fraction becomes very significant (>50%) at redshifts z>~2.
  • We present the results of our most recent works on Spitzer/MIPS 24 micron galaxies. Through a multiwavelength analysis, we study different properties (redshifts, luminosities, stellar masses) characterising the sources which produce the bulk of the mid-IR background. From a comparative study with the total population of Ks-selected galaxies, we determine that 24 micron sources account for an important fraction of the most massive galaxies present at different redshifts. On the other hand, we determine that 24 micron galaxies also produce most of the energy contained in the far-IR cosmic background at 70 and 160 microns. Furthermore, we are able to set tight constraints on the Cosmic Infrared Background (CIB) spectral energy distribution (SED). Our results help to clarify the links between these presumably different IR galaxy populations.
  • We have selected and analysed the properties of a sample of 2905 Ks<21.5 galaxies in ~ 131 sq.arcmin of the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey (GOODS) Chandra Deep Field South (CDFS), to obtain further constraints on the evolution of Ks-selected galaxies with respect to the results already obtained in previous studies. We made use of the public deep multiwavelength imaging from the optical B through the infrared (IR) 4.5 micron bands, in conjunction with available spectroscopic and COMBO17 data in the CDFS, to construct an optimised redshift catalogue for our galaxy sample. We computed the Ks-band LF and determined that its characteristic magnitude has a substantial brightening and a decreasing total density from z=0 to <z>=2.5. We also analysed the colours and number density evolution of galaxies with different stellar masses. Within our sample, and in contrast to what is observed for less massive systems, the vast majority (~ 85-90%) of the most massive (M>2.5x10^11 Msun) local galaxies appear to be in place before redshift z ~1. Around 65-70% of the total assemble between redshifts z=1 and z=3 and most of them display extremely red colours, suggesting that plausible star formation in these very massive systems should mainly proceed in obscured, short-timescale bursts. The remaining fraction (up to ~ 20%) could be in place at even higher redshifts z=3-4, pushing the first epoch of formation of massive galaxies beyond the limits of current near-IR surveys.
  • We present deep Ks<21.5 (Vega) identifications, redshifts and stellar masses for most of the sources composing the bulk of the 24 micron background in the GOODS/CDFS. Our identified sample consists of 747 Spitzer/MIPS 24 micron objects, and includes ~94% of all the 24 micron sources in the GOODS-South field which have fluxes Snu(24)>83 microJy (the 80% completeness limit of the Spitzer/GTO 24 micron catalog). 36% of our galaxies have spectroscopic redshifts (mostly at z<1.5) and the remaining ones have photometric redshifts of very good quality, with a median of |dz|=|zspec-zphot|/(1+zspec)=0.02. We find that MIPS 24 micron galaxies span the redshift range z~0-4, and that a substantial fraction (28%) lie at high redshifts z>1.5. We determine the existence of a bump in the redshift distribution at z~1.9, indicating the presence of a significant population of galaxies with PAH emission at these redshifts. Massive (M>10^11 Msun) star-forming galaxies at redshifts 2<z<3 are characterized by very high star-formation rates (SFR>500 Msun/yr), and some of them are able to construct a mass of 10^10-10^11 Msun in a single burst lifetime (~0.01-0.1 Gyr). At lower redshifts z<2, massive star-forming galaxies are also present, but appear to be building their stars on long timescales, either quiescently or in multiple modest burst-like episodes. At redshifts z~1-2, the ability of the burst-like mode to produce entire galaxies in a single event is limited to some lower (M<7x10^10 Msun) mass systems, and it is basically negligible at z<1. Our results support a scenario where star-formation activity is differential with assembled stellar mass and redshift, and where the relative importance of the burst-like mode proceeds in a down-sizing way from high to low redshifts. (abridged)
  • We present estimated redshifts and derived properties for a sample of 1663 galaxies with Ks <= 22 (Vega), selected from 50.4 sq.arcmin of the GOODS/CDFS field with deep ISAAC imaging, and make an extensive comparison of their properties with those of the extremely red galaxies (ERGs) selected in the same field. We study in detail the evolution of Ks-selected galaxies up to redshifts z ~ 4 and clarify the role of ERGs within the total Ks-band galaxy population. We compute the total Ks-band luminosity function (LF) and compare its evolution with the ERG LF. Up to <z_phot>=2.5, the bright end of the Ks-band LF shows no sign of decline, and is progressively well reproduced by the ERGs with increasing redshift. We also explore the evolution of massive systems present in our sample: up to 20%-25% of the population of local galaxies with assembled stellar mass M>1x10^11 Msun has been formed before redshift z ~ 4, and contains ~ 45% to 70% of the stellar mass density of the Universe at that redshift. Within our sample, the comoving number density of these massive systems is then essentially constant down to redshift z ~ 1.5, by which point most of them have apparently evolved into (I-Ks)-selected ERGs. The remaining massive systems observed in the local Universe are assembled later, at redshifts z <= 1.5. Our results therefore suggest a two-fold assembly history for massive galaxies, in which galaxy/star formation proceeds very efficiently in high mass haloes at very high redshift.
  • We have analysed 5-epoch GOODS HST-ACS B, V, I_775 and z datasets (V1.0 release), in conjunction with existing VLT-ISAAC imaging in the J, H and Ks bands, to derive estimated redshifts for the sample of 198 Extremely Red Galaxies (ERGs) with Ks<22 (Vega) and I_775-Ks>3.92 selected by Roche et al.(2003) from 50.4 sq.arcmin of the GOODS/CDFS field. We find that, at this depth, the ERG population spans the redshift range 0.5<z_phot<4.75 and over two decades in mass (~ 3x10^9 M_sun to ~3x10^11 M_sun). We explore the evolution of the ERG luminosity function (LF) from redshifts <z_phot>=1.0 to <z_phot>=2.5 and compare it with the global Ks-band LF at redshifts 1<z_phot<2. We find that the bright end of the ERG LF does not decrease from redshifts <z_phot>=2.0 to <z_phot>=2.5 and we connect this fact with the presence of progenitors of the local L>L* population at redshifts z_phot>2. We determine lower limits of rho_c=(6.1 +/- 1.9) x 10^{-5} Mpc^{-3} and rho_c=(2.1 +/- 1.1) x 10^{-5}Mpc^{-3} on the comoving densities of progenitors of local massive galaxies already assembled at redshifts <z_phot>=2.5 and <z_phot>=3.5, respectively. We have investigated the existence of high-redshift Lyman break galaxies massive enough to be included in this ERG sample. Out of an initial list of 12 potential very high redshift candidates, we have identified 2 ERGs which have a high probability of lying at z_phot>4. We discuss the advantages of multi-colour to single-colour selection techniques in obtaining reliable lists of very high-redshift candidate sources, and present revised lower redshift estimates for sources previously claimed as potential z> 5 dropouts in recent studies.(abridged)
  • We present the photometric redshift distribution of a sample of 198 Extremely Red Galaxies (ERGs) with Ks<22 and I-Ks>3.92 (Vega), selected by Roche et al. in 50.4 sq. arcmin of the Chandra Deep Field South (CDFS). The sample has been obtained using ISAAC-VLT and ACS-HST GOODS public data. We also show the results of a morphological study of the 72 brightest ERGs in the z band (z<25, AB).