• We compute the slope and curvature, at vanishing four-momentum transfer squared, of the leading order hadron vacuum polarization function, using lattice QCD. Calculations are performed with 2+1+1 flavors of staggered fermions directly at the physical values of the quark masses and in volumes of linear extent larger than 6fm. The continuum limit is carried out using six different lattice spacings. All connected and disconnected contributions are calculated, up to and including those of the charm.
  • In a previous letter (arXiv:1306.2287) we determined the isospin mass splittings of the baryon octet from a lattice calculation based on quenched QED and $N_f{=}2{+}1$ QCD simulations with 5 lattice spacings down to $0.054~\mathrm{fm}$, lattice sizes up to $6~\mathrm{fm}$ and average up-down quark masses all the way down to their physical value. Using the same data we determine here the corrections to Dashen's theorem and the individual up and down quark masses. For the parameter which quantifies violations to Dashens's theorem, we obtain $\epsilon=0.73(2)(5)(17)$, where the first error is statistical, the second is systematic, and the third is an estimate of the QED quenching error. For the light quark masses we obtain, $m_u=2.27(6)(5)(4)~\mathrm{MeV}$ and $m_d=4.67(6)(5)(4)~\mathrm{MeV}$ in the $\bar{\mathrm{MS}}$ scheme at $2~\mathrm{GeV}$ and the isospin breaking ratios $m_u/m_d=0.485(11)(8)(14)$, $R=38.2(1.1)(0.8)(1.4)$ and $Q=23.4(0.4)(0.3)(0.4)$. Our results exclude the $m_u=0$ solution to the strong CP problem by more than $24$ standard deviations.
  • We study the finite temperature transition in QCD with two flavors of dynamical fermions at a pseudoscalar pion mass of about 350 MeV. We use lattices with temporal extent of $N_t$=8, 10 and 12. For the first time in the literature a continuum limit is carried out for several observables with dynamical overlap fermions. These findings are compared with results obtained within the staggered fermion formalism at the same pion masses and extrapolated to the continuum limit. The presented results correspond to fixed topology and its effect is studied in the staggered case. Nice agreement is found between the overlap and staggered results.
  • Axions are one of the most attractive dark matter candidates. The evolution of their number density in the early universe can be determined by calculating the topological susceptibility $\chi(T)$ of QCD as a function of the temperature. Lattice QCD provides an ab initio technique to carry out such a calculation. A full result needs two ingredients: physical quark masses and a controlled continuum extrapolation from non-vanishing to zero lattice spacings. We determine $\chi(T)$ in the quenched framework (infinitely large quark masses) and extrapolate its values to the continuum limit. The results are compared with the prediction of the dilute instanton gas approximation (DIGA). A nice agreement is found for the temperature dependence, whereas the overall normalization of the DIGA result still differs from the non-perturbative continuum extrapolated lattice results by a factor of order ten. We discuss the consequences of our findings for the prediction of the amount of axion dark matter.
  • The existence and stability of atoms rely on the fact that neutrons are more massive than protons. The measured mass difference is only 0.14\% of the average of the two masses. A slightly smaller or larger value would have led to a dramatically different universe. Here, we show that this difference results from the competition between electromagnetic and mass isospin breaking effects. We performed lattice quantum-chromodynamics and quantum-electrodynamics computations with four nondegenerate Wilson fermion flavors and computed the neutron-proton mass-splitting with an accuracy of $300$ kilo-electron volts, which is greater than $0$ by $5$ standard deviations. We also determine the splittings in the $\Sigma$, $\Xi$, $D$ and $\Xi_{cc}$ isospin multiplets, exceeding in some cases the precision of experimental measurements.
  • Electromagnetic effects are increasingly being accounted for in lattice quantum chromodynamics computations. Because of their long-range nature, they lead to large finite-size effects over which it is important to gain analytical control. Nonrelativistic effective field theories provide an efficient tool to describe these effects. Here we argue that some care has to be taken when applying these methods to quantum electrodynamics in a finite volume.
  • Ordinary matter is described by six fundamental parameters: three couplings (gravitational, electromagnetic and strong) and three masses: the electron's (m_e) and those of the up (m_u) and down (m_d) quarks. An additional mass enters through quantum fluctuations: the strange quark mass (m_s). The three couplings and m_e are known with an accuracy of better than a few per mil. Despite their importance, $m_u$, $m_d$ (their average m_{ud}) and m_s are relatively poorly known: e.g. the Particle Data Group quotes them with conservative errors close to 25%. Here we determine these quantities with a precision below 2% by performing ab initio lattice quantum chromodynamics (QCD) calculations, in which all systematics are controlled. We use pion and quark masses down to (and even below) their physical values, lattice sizes of up to 6 fm, and five lattice spacings to extrapolate to continuum spacetime. All necessary renormalizations are performed nonperturbatively.
  • We determine the phase diagram of QCD on the \mu-T plane for small to moderate chemical potentials. Two transition lines are defined with two quantities, the chiral condensate and the strange quark number susceptibility. The calculations are carried out on N_t =6,8 and 10 lattices generated with a Symanzik improved gauge and stout-link improved 2+1 flavor staggered fermion action using physical quark masses. After carrying out the continuum extrapolation we find that both quantities result in a similar curvature of the transition line. Furthermore, our results indicate that in leading order the width of the transition region remains essentially the same as the chemical potential is increased.
  • At the precision reached in current lattice QCD calculations, electromagnetic effects are becoming numerically relevant. We will present preliminary results for electromagnetic corrections to light hadron masses, based on simulations in which a $\mathrm{U}(1)$ degree of freedom is superimposed on $N_f=2+1$ QCD configurations from the BMW collaboration.
  • A status report is given for a joint project of the Budapest-Marseille-Wuppertal collaboration and the Regensburg group to study the quark mass-dependence of octet baryons in SU(3) Baryon XPT. This formulation is expected to extend to larger masses than Heavy-Baryon XPT. Its applicability is tested with 2+1 flavor data which cover three lattice spacings and pion masses down to about 190 MeV, in large volumes. Also polynomial and rational interpolations in M_\pi^2 and M_K^2 are used to assess the uncertainty due to the ansatz. Both frameworks are combined to explore the precision to be expected in a controlled determination of the nucleon sigma term and strangeness content.
  • While the masses of light hadrons have been extensively studied in lattice QCD simulations, there exist only a few exploratory calculations of the strong decay widths of hadronic resonances. We will present preliminary results of a computation of the rho meson width obtained using $N_f=2+1$ flavor simulations. The work is based on L\"uscher's formalism and its extension to moving frames.
  • We give details of our precise determination of the light quark masses m_{ud}=(m_u+m_d)/2 and m_s in 2+1 flavor QCD, with simulated pion masses down to 120 MeV, at five lattice spacings, and in large volumes. The details concern the action and algorithm employed, the HMC force with HEX smeared clover fermions, the choice of the scale setting procedure and of the input masses. After an overview of the simulation parameters, extensive checks of algorithmic stability, autocorrelation and (practical) ergodicity are reported. To corroborate the good scaling properties of our action, explicit tests of the scaling of hadron masses in N_f=3 QCD are carried out. Details of how we control finite volume effects through dedicated finite volume scaling runs are reported. To check consistency with SU(2) Chiral Perturbation Theory the behavior of M_\pi^2/m_{ud} and F_\pi as a function of m_{ud} is investigated. Details of how we use the RI/MOM procedure with a separate continuum limit of the running of the scalar density R_S(\mu,\mu') are given. This procedure is shown to reproduce the known value of r_0m_s in quenched QCD. Input from dispersion theory is used to split our value of m_{ud} into separate values of m_u and m_d. Finally, our procedure to quantify both systematic and statistical uncertainties is discussed.
  • More than 99% of the mass of the visible universe is made up of protons and neutrons. Both particles are much heavier than their quark and gluon constituents, and the Standard Model of particle physics should explain this difference. We present a full ab-initio calculation of the masses of protons, neutrons and other light hadrons, using lattice quantum chromodynamics. Pion masses down to 190 mega electronvolts are used to extrapolate to the physical point with lattice sizes of approximately four times the inverse pion mass. Three lattice spacings are used for a continuum extrapolation. Our results completely agree with experimental observations and represent a quantitative confirmation of this aspect of the Standard Model with fully controlled uncertainties.
  • We extend our previous study [Phys. Lett. B643 (2006) 46] of the cross-over temperatures (T_c) of QCD. We improve our zero temperature analysis by using physical quark masses and finer lattices. In addition to the kaon decay constant used for scale setting we determine four quantities (masses of the \Omega baryon, K^*(892) and \phi(1020) mesons and the pion decay constant) which are found to agree with experiment. This implies that --independently of which of these quantities is used to set the overall scale-- the same results are obtained within a few percent. At finite temperature we use finer lattices down to a <= 0.1 fm (N_t=12 and N_t=16 at one point). Our new results confirm completely our previous findings. We compare the results with those of the 'hotQCD' collaboration.
  • Some algorithmic details of our $N_f=2+1$ QCD mixed action simulations with overlap valence and improved Wilson sea quarks are presented.
  • We determine the static quark free energies around the transition temperature using 2+1 flavors of staggered fermions. Simulations are carried out on N_t=4,6,8 and 10 lattices using physical quark masses. The free energies extracted from Polyakov-loop correlators are extrapolated to the continuum limit.
  • The transition temperature ($T_c$) of QCD is determined by Symanzik improved gauge and stout-link improved staggered fermionic lattice simulations. We use physical masses both for the light quarks ($m_{ud}$) and for the strange quark ($m_s$). Four sets of lattice spacings ($N_t$=4,6,8 and 10) were used to carry out a continuum extrapolation. It turned out that only $N_t$=6,8 and 10 can be used for a controlled extrapolation, $N_t$=4 is out of the scaling region. Since the QCD transition is a non-singular cross-over there is no unique $T_c$. Thus, different observables lead to different numerical $T_c$ values even in the continuum and thermodynamic limit. The peak of the renormalized chiral susceptibility predicts $T_c$=151(3)(3) MeV, wheres $T_c$-s based on the strange quark number susceptibility and Polyakov loops result in 24(4) MeV and 25(4) MeV larger values, respectively. Another consequence of the cross-over is the non-vanishing width of the peaks even in the thermodynamic limit, which we also determine. These numbers are attempted to be the full result for the $T$$\neq$0 transition, though other lattice fermion formulations (e.g. Wilson) are needed to cross-check them.
  • We determine the nature of the QCD transition using lattice calculations for physical quark masses. Susceptibilities are extrapolated to vanishing lattice spacing for three physical volumes, the smallest and largest of which differ by a factor of five. This ensures that a true transition should result in a dramatic increase of the susceptibilities.No such behaviour is observed: our finite-size scaling analysis shows that the finite-temperature QCD transition in the hot early Universe was not a real phase transition, but an analytic crossover (involving a rapid change, as opposed to a jump, as the temperature varied). As such, it will be difficult to find experimental evidence of this transition from astronomical observations.
  • We perform dynamical QCD simulations with $n_f=2$ overlap fermions by hybrid Monte-Carlo method on $6^4$ to $8^3\times 16$ lattices. We study the problem of topological sector changing. A new method is proposed which works without topological sector changes. We use this new method to determine the topological susceptibility at various quark masses.
  • We present numerical results on the static quark--anti-quark grand canonical potential in full QCD at non-vanishing temperature ($T$) and quark chemical potential ($\mu$). Non-zero $\mu$-s are reached by means of multi-parameter reweighting. The dynamical staggered simulations were carried out for $n_f=2+1$ flavors with physical quark masses on $4\times 12^3$ lattices.
  • We present results of a hybrid Monte-Carlo algorithm for dynamical, $n_f=2$, four-dimensional QCD with overlap fermions. The fermionic force requires careful treatment, when changing topological sectors. The pion mass dependence of the topological susceptibility is studied on $6^4$ and $12\cdot 6^3$ lattices. The results are transformed into physical units.
  • We present N_t=4 lattice results for the equation of state of 2+1 flavour staggered, dynamical QCD at finite temperature and chemical potential. We use the overlap improving multi-parameter reweighting technique to extend the equation of state for non-vanishing chemical potentials. The results are obtained along the line of constant physics. Our physical parameters extend in temperature and baryon chemical potential upto \approx 500-600 MeV.
  • We present an N_t=4 lattice study for the equation of state of 2+1 flavour staggered, dynamical QCD at finite temperature and chemical potential. We use the overlap improving multi-parameter reweighting technique to extend the equation of state for non-vanishing chemical potentials. The results are obtained on the line of constant physics and our physical parameters extend in temperature and baryon chemical potential upto \approx 500-600 MeV.
  • We present first, exploratory results of a hybrid Monte-Carlo algorithm for dynamical, n_f=2, four-dimensional QCD with overlap fermions. As expected, the computational requirements are typically two orders of magnitude larger for the dynamical overlap formalism than for the more conventional (Wilson or staggered) formulations.
  • We compare our 2+1 flavor, staggered QCD lattice results with a quasiparticle picture. We determine the pressure, the energy density, the baryon density, the speed of sound and the thermal masses as a function of T and $\mu_B$. For the available thermodynamic quantities the difference is a few percent between the results of the two approaches. We also give the phase diagram on the $\mu_B$--T plane and estimate the critical chemical potential at vanishing temperature.