• This paper describes the beginning of the Far-Infrared Surveyor mission study for NASA's Astrophysics Decadal 2020. We describe the scope of the study, and the open process approach of the Science and Technology Definition Team. We are currently developing the science cases and provide some preliminary highlights here. We note key areas for technological innovation and improvements necessary to make a Far-Infrared Surveyor mission a reality.
  • Debris discs are a consequence of the planet formation process and constitute the fingerprints of planetesimal systems. Their solar system's counterparts are the asteroid and Edgeworth-Kuiper belts. The DUNES survey aims at detecting extra-solar analogues to the Edgeworth-Kuiper belt around solar-type stars, putting in this way the solar system into context. The survey allows us to address some questions related to the prevalence and properties of planetesimal systems. We used {\it Herschel}/PACS to observe a sample of nearby FGK stars. Data at 100 and 160 $\mu$m were obtained, complemented in some cases with observations at 70 $\mu$m, and at 250, 350 and 500 $\mu$m using SPIRE. The observing strategy was to integrate as deep as possible at 100 $\mu$m to detect the stellar photosphere. Debris discs have been detected at a fractional luminosity level down to several times that of the Edgeworth-Kuiper belt. The incidence rate of discs around the DUNES stars is increased from a rate of $\sim$ 12.1% $\pm$ 5% before \emph{Herschel} to $\sim$ 20.2% $\pm$ 2%. A significant fraction ($\sim$ 52%) of the discs are resolved, which represents an enormous step ahead from the previously known resolved discs. Some stars are associated with faint far-IR excesses attributed to a new class of cold discs. Although it cannot be excluded that these excesses are produced by coincidental alignment of background galaxies, statistical arguments suggest that at least some of them are true debris discs. Some discs display peculiar SEDs with spectral indexes in the 70-160$\mu$m range steeper than the Rayleigh-Jeans one. An analysis of the debris disc parameters suggests that a decrease might exist of the mean black body radius from the F-type to the K-type stars. In addition, a weak trend is suggested for a correlation of disc sizes and an anticorrelation of disc temperatures with the stellar age.
  • A deep and detailed examination of 29 classical Cepheids with the Spitzer Space Telescope has revealed three stars with strong nearby extended emission detected in multiple bands which appears to be physically associated with the stars. RS Pup was already known to possess extended infrared emission, while the extended emission around the other two stars S Mus and delta Cep is newly discovered in our observations. Four other stars GH Lup, l Car, T Mon and X Cyg show tentative evidence for extended infrared emission. An unusual elongated extended object next to SZ Tau appears to be a background or foreground object in a chance alignment with the Cepheid. The inferred mass loss rates upper limits for S Mus and delta Cep are in the range from 1e-9 to 1e-8 Msun/yr, with the upper limit for RS Pup as high as 1e-6 Msun/yr. Mass loss during post-main-sequence evolution has been proposed as a resolution to the discrepancy between pulsational and dynamical masses of Cepheid variable stars: dust in the lost material would make itself known by the presence of an infrared bright nebula, or unresolved infrared excess. The observed frequency of infrared circumstellar emission (<24%) and the mass loss rate we estimate for our sources shows that dusty mass loss can only account for part of the Cepheid mass loss discrepancy. Nevertheless, our direct evidence that mass loss is active during the Cepheid phase is an important confirmation that these processes need to be included in evolutionary and pulsation models of these stars, and should be taken into account in the calibration of the Cepheid distance scale.
  • Spitzer MIPS 24 um images were obtained for 36 Galactic planetary nebulae (PNe) whose central stars are hot white dwarfs (WDs) or pre-WDs with effective temperatures of ~100,000 K or higher. Diffuse 24 um emission is detected in 28 of these PNe. The eight non-detections are angularly large PNe with very low H-alpha surface brightnesses. We find three types of correspondence between the 24 um emission and H-alpha line emission of these PNe: six show 24 um emission more extended than H-alpha emission, nine have a similar extent at 24 um and H-alpha, and 13 show diffuse 24 um emission near the center of the H-alpha shell. The sizes and surface brightnesses of these three groups of PNe and the non-detections suggest an evolutionary sequence, with the youngest ones being brightest and the most evolved ones undetected. The 24 um band emission from these PNe is attributed to [O IV] 25.9 um and [Ne V] 24.3 um line emission and dust continuum emission, but the relative contributions of these three components depend on the temperature of the central star and the distribution of gas and dust in the nebula.
  • We present Spitzer observations of the unusual variable V838 Monocerotis. Extended emission is detected around the object at 24, 70 and 160um. The extended infrared emission is strongly correlated spatially with the HST optical light echo images taken at a similar epoch. We attribute this diffuse nebulosity to be from an infrared light echo caused by reprocessed thermal emission from dust heated by the outward-propagating radiation from the 2002 eruption. The detection of an IR light echo provides an opportunity to estimate the mass in dust of the echo material and hence constrain its origin. We estimate the dust mass of the light echo to be on the order of a solar mass - thereby implying the total gas plus dust mass to be considerably more - too massive for the echo material to be the ejecta from previous outburst/mass-losing events. This is therefore suggestive that a significant fraction of the matter seen through the light echo is interstellar in origin. Unresolved emission at 24 and 70um is also seen at the position of the central star possibly indicating the presence of hot dust freshly condensed in the outburst ejecta.
  • We report the discovery of a debris system associated with the $\sim 30$ Myr old G3/5V star HD 12039 using {\it Spitzer Space Telescope} observations from 3.6 -- 160$\mu$m. An observed infrared excess (L$_{\rm IR}$/L$_{\ast} = 1\times10^{-4}$) above the expected photosphere for $\lambda \gtrsim 14\mu$m is fit by thermally emitting material with a color temperature of T$\sim 110$ K, warmer than the majority of debris disks identified to date around Sun-like stars. The object is not detected at 70$\mu$m with a 3$\sigma$ upper limit 6 times the expected photospheric flux. The spectrum of the infrared excess can be explained by warm, optically thin material comprised of blackbody-like grains of size $\gtrsim 7 \mu$m that reside in a belt orbiting the star at 4--6 AU. An alternate model dominated by smaller grains, near the blow-out size $a\sim 0.5\mu$m, located at 30-40AU is also possible, but requires the dust to have been produced recently since such small grains will be expelled from the system by radiation pressure in $\sim$ few $\times 10^{2}$yrs.