• By using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) / spectroscopy (STS), we systematically characterize the electronic structure of lightly doped 1T-TiSe2, and demonstrate the existence of the electronic inhomogeneity and the pseudogap state. It is found that the intercalation induced lattice distortion impacts the local band structure and reduce the size of the charge density wave (CDW) gap with the persisted 2x2 spatial modulation. On the other hand, the delocalized doping electrons promote the formation of pseudogap. Domination by either of the two effects results in the separation of two characteristic regions in real space, exhibiting rather different electronic structures. Further doping electrons to the surface confirms that the pseudogap may be the precursor for the superconducting gap. This study suggests that the competition of local lattice distortion and the delocalized doping effect contribute to the complicated relationship between charge density wave and superconductivity for intercalated 1T-TiSe2.
  • We report a post-growth aging mechanism of Bi$_2$Te$_3$(111) films with scanning tunneling microscopy in combination with density functional theory calculation. It is found that a monolayered structure with a squared lattice symmetry gradually aggregates from surface steps. Theoretical calculations indicate that the van der Waals (vdW) gap not only acts as a natural reservoir for self-intercalated Bi and Te atoms, but also provides them easy diffusion pathways. Once hopping out of the gap, these defective atoms prefer to develop into a two dimensional BiTe superstructure on the Bi$_2$Te$_3$(111) surface driven by positive energy gain. Considering the common nature of weakly bonding between vdW layers, we expect such unusual diffusion and aggregation of the intercalated atoms may be of general importance for most kinds of vdW layered materials.
  • Heteroepitaxial structures based on Bi$_{2}$Te$_{3}$-type topological insulators (TIs) exhibit exotic quantum phenomena. For optimal characterization of these phenomena, it is desirable to control the interface structure during film growth on such TIs. In this process, adatom mobility is a key factor. We demonstrate that Pb mobility on the Bi$_{2}$Te$_{3}$(111) surface can be modified by the engineering local strain, {\epsilon}, which is induced around the point-like defects intrinsically forming in the Bi$_{2}$Te$_{3}$(111) thin film grown on a Si(111)-7 $\times$ 7 substrate. Scanning tunneling microscopy observations of Pb adatom and cluster distributions and first-principles density functional theory (DFT) analyses of the adsorption energy and diffusion barrier E$_{d}$ of Pb adatom on Bi$_{2}$Te$_{3}$(111) surface show a significant influence of {\epsilon}. Surprisingly, E$_d$ reveals a cusp-like dependence on {\epsilon} due to a bifurcation in the position of the stable adsorption site at the critical tensile strain {\epsilon}$_{c}$ $ \approx $ 0.8%. This constitutes a very different strain-dependence of diffusivity from all previous studies focusing on conventional metal or semiconductor surfaces. Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of Pb deposition, diffusion, and irreversible aggregation incorporating the DFT results reveal adatom and cluster distributions compatible with our experimental observations.
  • Surface reactivity is important in modifying the physical and chemical properties of surface sensitive materials, such as the topological insulators (TIs). Even though many studies addressing the reactivity of TIs towards external gases have been reported, it is still under heavy debate whether and how the topological insulators react with H$_2$O. Here, we employ scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) to directly probe the surface reaction of Bi$_2$Te$_3$ towards H$_2$O. Surprisingly, it is found that only the top quintuple layer is reactive to H$_2$O, resulting in a hydrated Bi bilayer as well as some Bi islands, which passivate the surface and prevent from the subsequent reaction. A reaction mechanism is proposed with H$_2$Te and hydrated Bi as the products. Unexpectedly, our study indicates the reaction with water is intrinsic and not dependent on any surface defects. Since water inevitably exists, these findings provide key information when considering the reactions of Bi$_2$Te$_3$ with residual gases or atmosphere.
  • Majorana fermion (MF) whose antiparticle is itself has been predicted in condensed matter systems. Signatures of the MFs have been reported as zero energy modes in various systems. More definitive evidences are highly desired to verify the existence of the MF. Very recently, theory has predicted MFs to induce spin selective Andreev reflection (SSAR), a novel magnetic property which can be used to detect the MFs. Here we report the first observation of the SSAR from MFs inside vortices in Bi2Te3/NbSe2 hetero-structure, in which topological superconductivity was previously established. By using spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy (STM/STS), we show that the zero-bias peak of the tunneling differential conductance at the vortex center is substantially higher when the tip polarization and the external magnetic field are parallel than anti-parallel to each other. Such strong spin dependence of the tunneling is absent away from the vortex center, or in a conventional superconductor. The observed spin dependent tunneling effect is a direct evidence for the SSAR from MFs, fully consistent with theoretical analyses. Our work provides definitive evidences of MFs and will stimulate the MFs research on their novel physical properties, hence a step towards their statistics and application in quantum computing.
  • We report an atomic-scale characterization of ZrTe$_5$ by using scanning tunneling microscopy. We observe a bulk bandgap of ~80 meV with topological edge states at the step edge, and thus demonstrate ZrTe$_5$ is a two dimensional topological insulator. It is also found that an applied magnetic field induces energetic splitting and spatial separation of the topological edge states, which can be attributed to a strong link between the topological edge states and bulk topology. The perfect surface steps and relatively large bandgap make ZrTe$_5$ be a potential candidate for future fundamental studies and device applications.