• We investigate the odd multiway node (edge) cut problem where the input is a graph with a specified collection of terminal nodes and the goal is to find a smallest subset of nonterminal nodes (edges) to delete so that the terminal nodes do not have an odd length path between them. In an earlier work, Lokshtanov and Ramanujan showed that both odd multiway node cut and odd multiway edge cut are fixed-parameter tractable (FPT) when parameterized by the size of the solution in undirected graphs. In this work, we focus on directed acyclic graphs (DAGs) and design a fixed-parameter algorithm. Our main contribution is a broadening of the shadow-removal framework to address parity problems in DAGs. We complement our FPT results with tight approximability as well as polyhedral results for 2 terminals in DAGs. Additionally, we show inapproximability results for odd multiway edge cut in undirected graphs even for 2 terminals.
  • Locality sensitive hashing (LSH) was introduced by Indyk and Motwani (STOC `98) to give the first sublinear time algorithm for the c-approximate nearest neighbor (ANN) problem using only polynomial space. At a high level, an LSH family hashes "nearby" points to the same bucket and "far away" points to different buckets. The quality of measure of an LSH family is its LSH exponent, which helps determine both query time and space usage. In a seminal work, Andoni and Indyk (FOCS `06) constructed an LSH family based on random ball partitioning of space that achieves an LSH exponent of 1/c^2 for the l_2 norm, which was later shown to be optimal by Motwani, Naor and Panigrahy (SIDMA `07) and O'Donnell, Wu and Zhou (TOCT `14). Although optimal in the LSH exponent, the ball partitioning approach is computationally expensive. So, in the same work, Andoni and Indyk proposed a simpler and more practical hashing scheme based on Euclidean lattices and provided computational results using the 24-dimensional Leech lattice. However, no theoretical analysis of the scheme was given, thus leaving open the question of finding the exponent of lattice based LSH. In this work, we resolve this question by showing the existence of lattices achieving the optimal LSH exponent of 1/c^2 using techniques from the geometry of numbers. At a more conceptual level, our results show that optimal LSH space partitions can have periodic structure. Understanding the extent to which additional structure can be imposed on these partitions, e.g. to yield low space and query complexity, remains an important open problem.
  • The spectra of signed matrices have played a fundamental role in social sciences, graph theory, and control theory. In this work, we investigate the computational problems of identifying symmetric signings of matrices with natural spectral properties. Our results are twofold: 1. We show NP-completeness for the following three problems: verifying whether a given matrix has a symmetric signing that is positive semi-definite/singular/has bounded eigenvalues. However, we also illustrate that the complexity could substantially differ for input matrices that are adjacency matrices of graphs. 2. We exhibit a stark contrast between invertibility and the above-mentioned spectral properties: we show a combinatorial characterization of matrices with invertible symmetric signings and design an efficient algorithm using this characterization to verify whether a given matrix has an invertible symmetric signing. Next, we give an efficient algorithm to solve the search problem of finding an invertible symmetric signing for matrices whose support graph is bipartite. We also provide a lower bound on the number of invertible symmetric signed adjacency matrices. Finally, we give an efficient algorithm to find a minimum increase in support of a given symmetric matrix so that it has an invertible symmetric signing. We use combinatorial and spectral techniques in addition to classic results from matching theory. Our combinatorial characterization of matrices with invertible symmetric signings might be of independent interest.
  • The computational complexity of multicut-like problems may vary significantly depending on whether the terminals are fixed or not. In this work we present a comprehensive study of this phenomenon in two types of cut problems in directed graphs: double cut and bicut. 1. The fixed-terminal edge-weighted double cut is known to be solvable efficiently. We show a tight approximability factor of $2$ for the fixed-terminal node-weighted double cut. We show that the global node-weighted double cut cannot be approximated to a factor smaller than $3/2$ under the Unique Games Conjecture (UGC). 2. The fixed-terminal edge-weighted bicut is known to have a tight approximability factor of $2$. We show that the global edge-weighted bicut is approximable to a factor strictly better than $2$, and that the global node-weighted bicut cannot be approximated to a factor smaller than $3/2$ under UGC. 3. In relation to these investigations, we also prove two results on undirected graphs which are of independent interest. First, we show NP-completeness and a tight inapproximability bound of $4/3$ for the node-weighted $3$-cut problem. Second, we show that for constant $k$, there exists an efficient algorithm to solve the minimum $\{s,t\}$-separating $k$-cut problem. Our techniques for the algorithms are combinatorial, based on LPs and based on enumeration of approximate min-cuts. Our hardness results are based on combinatorial reductions and integrality gap instances.
  • A $k$-lift of an $n$-vertex base graph $G$ is a graph $H$ on $n\times k$ vertices, where each vertex $v$ of $G$ is replaced by $k$ vertices $v_1,\cdots{},v_k$ and each edge $(u,v)$ in $G$ is replaced by a matching representing a bijection $\pi_{uv}$ so that the edges of $H$ are of the form $(u_i,v_{\pi_{uv}(i)})$. Lifts have been studied as a means to efficiently construct expanders. In this work, we study lifts obtained from groups and group actions. We derive the spectrum of such lifts via the representation theory principles of the underlying group. Our main results are: (1) There is a constant $c_1$ such that for every $k\geq 2^{c_1nd}$, there does not exist an abelian $k$-lift $H$ of any $n$-vertex $d$-regular base graph with $H$ being almost Ramanujan (nontrivial eigenvalues of the adjacency matrix at most $O(\sqrt{d})$ in magnitude). This can be viewed as an analogue of the well-known no-expansion result for abelian Cayley graphs. (2) A uniform random lift in a cyclic group of order $k$ of any $n$-vertex $d$-regular base graph $G$, with the nontrivial eigenvalues of the adjacency matrix of $G$ bounded by $\lambda$ in magnitude, has the new nontrivial eigenvalues also bounded by $\lambda+O(\sqrt{d})$ in magnitude with probability $1-ke^{-\Omega(n/d^2)}$. In particular, there is a constant $c_2$ such that for every $k\leq 2^{c_2n/d^2}$, there exists a lift $H$ of every Ramanujan graph in a cyclic group of order $k$ with $H$ being almost Ramanujan. We use this to design a quasi-polynomial time algorithm to construct almost Ramanujan expanders deterministically. The existence of expanding lifts in cyclic groups of order $k=2^{O(n/d^2)}$ can be viewed as a lower bound on the order $k_0$ of the largest abelian group that produces expanding lifts. Our results show that the lower bound matches the upper bound for $k_0$ (upto $d^3$ in the exponent).
  • Stabilization of graphs has received substantial attention in recent years due to its connection to game theory. Stable graphs are exactly the graphs inducing a matching game with non-empty core. They are also the graphs that induce a network bargaining game with a balanced solution. A graph with weighted edges is called stable if the maximum weight of an integral matching equals the cost of a minimum fractional weighted vertex cover. If a graph is not stable, it can be stabilized in different ways. Recent papers have considered the deletion or addition of edges and vertices in order to stabilize a graph. In this work, we focus on a fine-grained stabilization strategy, namely stabilization of graphs by fractionally increasing edge weights. We show the following results for stabilization by minimum weight increase in edge weights (min additive stabilizer): (i) Any approximation algorithm for min additive stabilizer that achieves a factor of $O(|V|^{1/24-\epsilon})$ for $\epsilon>0$ would lead to improvements in the approximability of densest-$k$-subgraph. (ii) Min additive stabilizer has no $o(\log{|V|})$ approximation unless NP=P. Results (i) and (ii) together provide the first super-constant hardness results for any graph stabilization problem. On the algorithmic side, we present (iii) an algorithm to solve min additive stabilizer in factor-critical graphs exactly in poly-time, (iv) an algorithm to solve min additive stabilizer in arbitrary-graphs exactly in time exponential in the size of the Tutte set, and (v) a poly-time algorithm with approximation factor at most $\sqrt{|V|}$ for a super-class of the instances generated in our hardness proofs.
  • Motivated by the structural analogies between point lattices and linear error-correcting codes, and by the mature theory on locally testable codes, we initiate a systematic study of local testing for membership in lattices. Testing membership in lattices is also motivated in practice, by applications to integer programming, error detection in lattice-based communication, and cryptography. Apart from establishing the conceptual foundations of lattice testing, our results include the following: 1. We demonstrate upper and lower bounds on the query complexity of local testing for the well-known family of code formula lattices. Furthermore, we instantiate our results with code formula lattices constructed from Reed-Muller codes, and obtain nearly-tight bounds. 2. We show that in order to achieve low query complexity, it is sufficient to design one-sided non-adaptive canonical tests. This result is akin to, and based on an analogous result for error-correcting codes due to Ben-Sasson et al. (SIAM J. Computing 35(1) pp1-21).
  • Lattices are discrete mathematical objects with widespread applications to integer programs as well as modern cryptography. A fundamental problem in both domains is the Closest Vector Problem (popularly known as CVP). It is well-known that CVP can be easily solved in lattices that have an orthogonal basis \emph{if} the orthogonal basis is specified. This motivates the orthogonality decision problem: verify whether a given lattice has an orthogonal basis. Surprisingly, the orthogonality decision problem is not known to be either NP-complete or in P. In this paper, we focus on the orthogonality decision problem for a well-known family of lattices, namely Construction-A lattices. These are lattices of the form $C+q\mathbb{Z}^n$, where $C$ is an error-correcting $q$-ary code, and are studied in communication settings. We provide a complete characterization of lattices obtained from binary and ternary codes using Construction-A that have an orthogonal basis. We use this characterization to give an efficient algorithm to solve the orthogonality decision problem. Our algorithm also finds an orthogonal basis if one exists for this family of lattices. We believe that these results could provide a better understanding of the complexity of the orthogonality decision problem for general lattices.
  • In a breakthrough work, Marcus-Spielman-Srivastava recently showed that every $d$-regular bipartite Ramanujan graph has a 2-lift that is also $d$-regular bipartite Ramanujan. As a consequence, a straightforward iterative brute-force search algorithm leads to the construction of a $d$-regular bipartite Ramanujan graph on $N$ vertices in time $2^{O(dN)}$. Shift $k$-lifts studied by Agarwal-Kolla-Madan lead to a natural approach for constructing Ramanujan graphs more efficiently. The number of possible shift $k$-lifts of a $d$-regular $n$-vertex graph is $k^{nd/2}$. Suppose the following holds for $k=2^{\Omega(n)}$: There exists a shift $k$-lift that maintains the Ramanujan property of $d$-regular bipartite graphs on $n$ vertices for all $n$. (*) Then, by performing a similar brute-force search algorithm, one would be able to construct an $N$-vertex bipartite Ramanujan graph in time $2^{O(d\,log^2 N)}$. Furthermore, if (*) holds for all $k \geq 2$, then one would obtain an algorithm that runs in $\mathrm{poly}_d(N)$ time. In this work, we take a first step towards proving (*) by showing the existence of shift $k$-lifts that preserve the Ramanujan property in $d$-regular bipartite graphs for $k=3,4$.
  • The cutting plane approach to optimal matchings has been discussed by several authors over the past decades (e.g., Padberg and Rao '82, Grotschel and Holland '85, Lovasz and Plummer '86, Trick '87, Fischetti and Lodi '07) and its convergence has been an open question. We give a cutting plane algorithm that converges in polynomial-time using only Edmonds' blossom inequalities; it maintains half-integral intermediate LP solutions supported by a disjoint union of odd cycles and edges. Our main insight is a method to retain only a subset of the previously added cutting planes based on their dual values. This allows us to quickly find violated blossom inequalities and argue convergence by tracking the number of odd cycles in the support of intermediate solutions.
  • We study the problem of learning a most biased coin among a set of coins by tossing the coins adaptively. The goal is to minimize the number of tosses until we identify a coin i* whose posterior probability of being most biased is at least 1-delta for a given delta. Under a particular probabilistic model, we give an optimal algorithm, i.e., an algorithm that minimizes the expected number of future tosses. The problem is closely related to finding the best arm in the multi-armed bandit problem using adaptive strategies. Our algorithm employs an optimal adaptive strategy -- a strategy that performs the best possible action at each step after observing the outcomes of all previous coin tosses. Consequently, our algorithm is also optimal for any starting history of outcomes. To our knowledge, this is the first algorithm that employs an optimal adaptive strategy under a Bayesian setting for this problem. Our proof of optimality employs tools from the field of Markov games.
  • We study the problem of answering \emph{$k$-way marginal} queries on a database $D \in (\{0,1\}^d)^n$, while preserving differential privacy. The answer to a $k$-way marginal query is the fraction of the database's records $x \in \{0,1\}^d$ with a given value in each of a given set of up to $k$ columns. Marginal queries enable a rich class of statistical analyses on a dataset, and designing efficient algorithms for privately answering marginal queries has been identified as an important open problem in private data analysis. For any $k$, we give a differentially private online algorithm that runs in time $$ \min{\exp(d^{1-\Omega(1/\sqrt{k})}), \exp(d / \log^{.99} d)\} $$ per query and answers any (possibly superpolynomially long and adaptively chosen) sequence of $k$-way marginal queries up to error at most $\pm .01$ on every query, provided $n \gtrsim d^{.51} $. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first algorithm capable of privately answering marginal queries with a non-trivial worst-case accuracy guarantee on a database of size $\poly(d, k)$ in time $\exp(o(d))$. Our algorithms are a variant of the private multiplicative weights algorithm (Hardt and Rothblum, FOCS '10), but using a different low-weight representation of the database. We derive our low-weight representation using approximations to the OR function by low-degree polynomials with coefficients of bounded $L_1$-norm. We also prove a strong limitation on our approach that is of independent approximation-theoretic interest. Specifically, we show that for any $k = o(\log d)$, any polynomial with coefficients of $L_1$-norm $poly(d)$ that pointwise approximates the $d$-variate OR function on all inputs of Hamming weight at most $k$ must have degree $d^{1-O(1/\sqrt{k})}$.
  • We study integer programming instances over polytopes P(A,b)={x:Ax<=b} where the constraint matrix A is random, i.e., its entries are i.i.d. Gaussian or, more generally, its rows are i.i.d. from a spherically symmetric distribution. The radius of the largest inscribed ball is closely related to the existence of integer points in the polytope. We show that for m=2^O(sqrt{n}), there exist constants c_0 < c_1 such that with high probability, random polytopes are integer feasible if the radius of the largest ball contained in the polytope is at least c_1sqrt{log(m/n)}; and integer infeasible if the largest ball contained in the polytope is centered at (1/2,...,1/2) and has radius at most c_0sqrt{log(m/n)}. Thus, random polytopes transition from having no integer points to being integer feasible within a constant factor increase in the radius of the largest inscribed ball. We show integer feasibility via a randomized polynomial-time algorithm for finding an integer point in the polytope. Our main tool is a simple new connection between integer feasibility and linear discrepancy. We extend a recent algorithm for finding low-discrepancy solutions (Lovett-Meka, FOCS '12) to give a constructive upper bound on the linear discrepancy of random matrices. By our connection between discrepancy and integer feasibility, this upper bound on linear discrepancy translates to the radius lower bound that guarantees integer feasibility of random polytopes.
  • A hitting set for a collection of sets is a set that has a non-empty intersection with each set in the collection; the hitting set problem is to find a hitting set of minimum cardinality. Motivated by instances of the hitting set problem where the number of sets to be hit is large, we introduce the notion of implicit hitting set problems. In an implicit hitting set problem the collection of sets to be hit is typically too large to list explicitly; instead, an oracle is provided which, given a set H, either determines that H is a hitting set or returns a set that H does not hit. We show a number of examples of classic implicit hitting set problems, and give a generic algorithm for solving such problems optimally. The main contribution of this paper is to show that this framework is valuable in developing approximation algorithms. We illustrate this methodology by presenting a simple on-line algorithm for the minimum feedback vertex set problem on random graphs. In particular our algorithm gives a feedback vertex set of size n-(1/p)\log{np}(1-o(1)) with probability at least 3/4 for the random graph G_{n,p} (the smallest feedback vertex set is of size n-(2/p)\log{np}(1+o(1))). We also consider a planted model for the feedback vertex set in directed random graphs. Here we show that a hitting set for a polynomial-sized subset of cycles is a hitting set for the planted random graph and this allows us to exactly recover the planted feedback vertex set.
  • We determine the thresholds for the number of variables, number of clauses, number of clause intersection pairs and the maximum clause degree of a k-CNF formula that guarantees satisfiability under the assumption that every two clauses share at most $\alpha$ variables. More formally, we call these formulas $\alpha$-intersecting and define, for example, a threshold $\mu_i(k,\alpha)$ for the number of clause intersection pairs $i$, such that every $\alpha$-intersecting k-CNF formula in which at most $\mu_i(k,\alpha)$ pairs of clauses share a variable is satisfiable and there exists an unsatisfiable $\alpha$-intersecting k-CNF formula with $\mu_m(k,\alpha)$ such intersections. We provide a lower bound for these thresholds based on the Lovasz Local Lemma and a nearly matching upper bound by constructing an unsatisfiable k-CNF to show that $\mu_i(k,\alpha) = \tilde{\Theta}(2^{k(2+1/\alpha)})$. Similar thresholds are determined for the number of variables ($\mu_n = \tilde{\Theta}(2^{k/\alpha})$) and the number of clauses ($\mu_m = \tilde{\Theta}(2^{k(1+\frac{1}{\alpha})})$) (see [Scheder08] for an earlier but independent report on this threshold). Our upper bound construction gives a family of unsatisfiable formula that achieve all four thresholds simultaneously.
  • The Lovasz Local Lemma (LLL) is a powerful result in probability theory that states that the probability that none of a set of bad events happens is nonzero if the probability of each event is small compared to the number of events that depend on it. It is often used in combination with the probabilistic method for non-constructive existence proofs. A prominent application is to k-CNF formulas, where LLL implies that, if every clause in the formula shares variables with at most d <= 2^k/e other clauses then such a formula has a satisfying assignment. Recently, a randomized algorithm to efficiently construct a satisfying assignment was given by Moser. Subsequently Moser and Tardos gave a randomized algorithm to construct the structures guaranteed by the LLL in a very general algorithmic framework. We address the main problem left open by Moser and Tardos of derandomizing these algorithms efficiently. Specifically, for a k-CNF formula with m clauses and d <= 2^{k/(1+\eps)}/e for any \eps\in (0,1), we give an algorithm that finds a satisfying assignment in time \tilde{O}(m^{2(1+1/\eps)}). This improves upon the deterministic algorithms of Moser and of Moser-Tardos with running time m^{\Omega(k^2)} which is superpolynomial for k=\omega(1) and upon other previous algorithms which work only for d\leq 2^{k/16}/4. Our algorithm works efficiently for a general version of LLL under the algorithmic framework of Moser and Tardos, and is also parallelizable, i.e., has polylogarithmic running time using polynomially many processors.
  • Logconcave functions represent the current frontier of efficient algorithms for sampling, optimization and integration in R^n. Efficient sampling algorithms to sample according to a probability density (to which the other two problems can be reduced) relies on good isoperimetry which is known to hold for arbitrary logconcave densities. In this paper, we extend this frontier in two ways: first, we characterize convexity-like conditions that imply good isoperimetry, i.e., what condition on function values along every line guarantees good isoperimetry? The answer turns out to be the set of (1/(n-1))-harmonic concave functions in R^n; we also prove that this is the best possible characterization along every line, of functions having good isoperimetry. Next, we give the first efficient algorithm for sampling according to such functions with complexity depending on a smoothness parameter. Further, noting that the multivariate Cauchy density is an important distribution in this class, we exploit certain properties of the Cauchy density to give an efficient sampling algorithm based on random walks with a mixing time that matches the current best bounds known for sampling logconcave functions.
  • Star-shaped bodies are an important nonconvex generalization of convex bodies (e.g., linear programming with violations). Here we present an efficient algorithm for sampling a given star-shaped body. The complexity of the algorithm grows polynomially in the dimension and inverse polynomially in the fraction of the volume taken up by the kernel of the star-shaped body. The analysis is based on a new isoperimetric inequality. Our main technical contribution is a tool for proving such inequalities when the domain is not convex. As a consequence, we obtain a polynomial algorithm for computing the volume of such a set as well. In contrast, linear optimization over star-shaped sets is NP-hard.