• The high-energy (> 100MeV) emission observed by Fermi-LAT during the prompt phase of some luminous gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) could arise from the cascade induced by interactions between accelerated protons and the radiation field of GRBs. The photomeson process, which is usually suggested to operate in such a hadronic explanation, requires a rather high proton energy (> 10^17eV) for an efficient interaction. However, whether GRBs can accelerate protons to such a high energy is far from guaranteed, although they have been suggested as the candidate source for ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays. In this work, we revisit the hadronic model for the prompt high-energy emission of GRBs with a smaller maximum proton energy than the usually adopted value estimated from the Bohm condition. In this case, the Bethe-Heitler pair production process becomes comparably important or even dominates over the photomeson process. We show that with a relatively low maximum proton energy with a Lorentz factor of 10^5 in the comoving frame, the cascade emission can still reproduce various types of high-energy spectrum of GRBs. For most GRBs without high-energy emission detected, the maximum proton energy could be even lower and relax the constraints on the parameters of GRB jet resulting from the fact of non-detection of GRB neutrinos by IceCube.
  • The ejected material at the binary neutron star merger GW 170817 was confirmed as a kilonova by UV, optical, and IR observations. This event provides a unique opportunity to investigate the particle acceleration at a mildly relativistic shock propagating in the circumbinary medium. In this paper, we simulate the nonthermal emission from electrons accelerated by the shock induced by the kilonova ejecta with a time-dependent method. The initial velocity and mass of the ejecta in the simulations are obtained from the kilonova observations in GW 170817. If the ambient density is high enough ($\geq 10^{-2}~\mbox{cm}^{-3}$), radio, optical/IR, and X-ray signals will be detected in a few years, though the off-axis short gamma-ray burst models, accounting for the X-ray/radio counterpart detected at $\sim 10$ days after the merger, implies low ambient density. We also demonstrate that the additional low-mass ($\sim 10^{-5} M_\odot$) component with a velocity of $0.5 c$--$0.8 c$ can reproduce the early X-ray/radio counterpart. This alternative model allows a favorably high density to detect the nonthermal emission due to the kilonova ejecta. Even for a low ambient density such as $\sim 10^{-3}~\mbox{cm}^{-3}$, depending on the microscopic parameters for the electron acceleration, we can expect a growth of radio flux of $\sim 0.1$ mJy in a few years.
  • We numerically simulate the gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglow emission with a one-zone time-dependent code. The temporal evolutions of the decelerating shocked shell and energy distributions of electrons and photons are consistently calculated. The photon spectrum and light curves for an observer are obtained taking into account the relativistic propagation of the shocked shell and the curvature of the emission surface. We find that the onset time of the afterglow is significantly earlier than the previous analytical estimate. The analytical formulae of the shock propagation and light curve for the radiative case are also different from our results. Our results show that even if the emission mechanism is switching from synchrotron to synchrotron self-Compton, the gamma-ray light curves can be a smooth power-law, which agrees with the observed light curve and the late detection of a 32 GeV photon in GRB 130427A. The uncertainty of the model parameters obtained with the analytical formula is discussed, especially in connection with the closure relation between spectral index and decay index.
  • The long gamma ray bursts (GRBs) may arise from the core collapse of massive stars. However, the long GRB rate does not follow the star formation rate (SFR) at high redshifts. In this Letter, we focus on the binary merger model and consider the high spin helium stars after the merger as the progenitor of long GRBs. With this scenario, we estimate the GRB rate by the population synthesis method with the metallicity evolution. Low metallicity binaries are easier to become long GRB progenitors than those for solar metallicity due to the weak wind mass loss and the difference in the stellar evolution. In our results, the long GRB rate roughly agrees with the observed rate, and shows a similar behavior to the observed redshift evolution.
  • The broadband emission of Pulsar Wind Nebulae (PWNe) is well described by non-thermal emissions from accelerated electrons and positrons. However, the standard shock acceleration model of PWNe does not account for the hard spectrum in radio wavelengths. The origin of the radio-emitting particles is also important to determine the pair production efficiency in the pulsar magnetosphere. Here, we propose a possible resolution for the particle energy distribution in PWNe; the radio-emitting particles are not accelerated at the pulsar wind termination shock but are stochastically accelerated by turbulence inside PWNe. We upgrade our past one-zone spectral evolution model including the energy diffusion, i.e., the stochastic acceleration, and apply to the Crab Nebula. A fairly simple form of the energy diffusion coefficient is assumed for this demonstrative study. For a particle injection to the stochastic acceleration process, we consider the continuous injection from the supernova ejecta or the impulsive injection associated with supernova explosion. The observed broadband spectrum and the decay of the radio flux are reproduced by tuning the amount of the particle injected to the stochastic acceleration process. The acceleration time-scale and the duration of the acceleration are required to be a few decades and a few hundred years, respectively. Our results imply that some unveiled mechanisms, such as back reaction to the turbulence, are required to make the energies of stochastically and shock accelerated particles comparable.
  • The observed radial profiles of the X-ray emission from Pulsar Wind Nebulae (PWNe) have been claimed to conflict with the standard one-dimensional (1-D) steady model. However, the 1-D model has not been tested to reproduce both the volume-integrated spectrum and the radial profile of the surface brightness, simultaneously. We revisit the 1-D steady model and apply it to PWNe 3C 58 and G21.5-0.9. We find that the parameters of the pulsar wind, the radius of the termination shock $r_{\rm s}$ and magnetization $\sigma$, greatly affect both the photon spectrum and radial profile of the emission. We have shown that the parameters constrained by the entire spectrum lead to a smaller X-ray nebula than observed one. We have also tested the case that reproduces only the observations in X and gamma-rays, ignoring the radio and optical components. In this case, there are parameter sets that reproduce both the spectrum and emission profile, but the advection time to the edge of the nebula becomes much smaller than the age. Our detailed discussion clarifies that the standard 1-D steady model has severe difficulty to reproduce both the volume-integrated spectrum and the surface brightness simultaneously. This implies that the model should be improved by taking into account extra physical processes such as spatial diffusion of particles. Additionally, we calculate the surface brightness profile of the radio, optical and TeV gamma-rays. The future observations in these wavelengths are also important to probe the spatial distributions of the relativistic plasma and the magnetic field of PWNe.
  • We discuss likely sources of cosmic rays in the $10^{15}-10^{20}$ eV range and their possible very high energy neutrino and gamma-ray signatures which could serve to identify these sources and constrain their physics. Among these sources we discuss in particular low luminosity gamma-ray bursts, including choked and shock-breakout objects, tidal disruption events and white dwarf mergers. Among efforts aimed at simultaneous secondary multi-messenger detections we discuss the AMON program.
  • We present the results of the simultaneous observation of the giant radio pulses (GRPs) from the Crab pulsar at 0.3, 1.6, 2.2, 6.7, and 8.4 GHz with four telescopes in Japan. We obtain 3194 and 272 GRPs occurring at the main pulse and the interpulse phases, respectively. A few GRPs detected at both 0.3 and 8.4 GHz are the most wide-band samples ever reported. In the frequency range from 0.3 to 2.2 GHz, we find that about 70\% or more of the GRP spectra are consistent with single power laws and the spectral indices of them are distributed from $-4$ to $-1$. We also find that a significant number of GRPs have such a hard spectral index (approximately $-1$) that the fluence at 0.3 GHz is below the detection limit ("dim-hard" GRPs). Stacking light curves of such dim-hard GRPs at 0.3 GHz, we detect consistent enhancement compared to the off-GRP light curve. Our samples show apparent correlations between the fluences and the spectral hardness, which indicates that more energetic GRPs tend to show softer spectra. Our comprehensive studies on the GRP spectra are useful materials to verify the GRP model of fast radio bursts in future observations.
  • The bright long gamma-ray burst GRB 141207A was observed by the {\it Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope} and detected by both instruments onboard. The observations show that the spectrum in the prompt phase is not well described by the canonical empirical Band function alone, and that an additional power-law component is needed. In the early phase of the prompt emission, a modified blackbody with a hard low-energy photon index ($\alpha$ = +0.2 -- +0.4) is detected, which suggests a photospheric origin. In a finely time-resolved analysis, the spectra are also well fitted by the modified blackbody combined with a power-law function. We discuss the physical parameters of the photosphere such as the bulk Lorentz factor of the relativistic flow and the radius. We also discuss the physical origin of the extra power-law component observed during the prompt phase in the context of different models such as leptonic and hadronic scenarios in the internal shock regime and synchrotron emission in the external forward shock. In the afterglow phase, the temporal and spectral behaviors of the temporally extended high-energy emission and the fading X-ray emission detected by XRT on-board {\it Swift} are consistent with synchrotron emission in a radiative external forward shock.
  • We propose a novel model to produce ultrahigh-energy cosmic-rays (UHECRs) in gamma-ray burst jets. After the prompt gamma-ray emission, hydrodynamical turbulence is excited in the GRB jets at or before the afterglow phase. The mildly relativistic turbulence stochastically accelerates protons. The acceleration rate is much slower than the usual first-order shock acceleration rate, but in this case it can be energy-independent. The resultant UHECR spectrum is so hard that the bulk energy is concentrated in the highest energy range, resulting in a moderate requirement for the typical cosmic ray luminosity of $\sim 10^{53.5}~\mbox{erg}~\mbox{s}^{-1}$. In this model, the secondary gamma-ray and neutrino emissions initiated by photopion production are significantly suppressed. Although the UHECR spectrum at injection shows a curved feature, this does not conflict with the observed UHECR spectral shape. The cosmogenic neutrino spectrum in the $10^{17}$--$10^{18}$ eV range becomes distinctively hard in this model, which may be verified by future observations.
  • Recent $\gamma$-ray observations suggest that the particle acceleration occurs at the outer region of the pulsar magnetosphere. The magnetic field lines in the outer acceleration region (OAR) are connected to the neutron star surface (NSS). If copious electron--positron pairs are produced near the NSS, such pairs flow into the OAR and screen the electric field there. To activate the OAR, the electromagnetic cascade due to the electric field near the NSS should be suppressed. However, since a return current is expected along the field lines through the OAR, the outflow extracted from the NSS alone cannot screen the electric field just above the NSS. In this paper, we analytically and numerically study the electric-field screening at the NSS taking into account the effects of the back-flowing particles from the OAR. In certain limited cases, the electric field is screened without significant pair cascade if only ultrarelativistic particles ($\gamma\gg1$) flow back to the NSS. On the other hand, if electron--positron pairs with a significant number density and mildly relativistic temperature, expected to distribute in a wide region of the magnetosphere, flow back to the NSS, these particles adjust the current and charge densities, so that the electric field can be screened without pair cascade. We obtain the condition for the number density of particles to screen the electric field at the NSS. We also find that in ion-extracted case from the NSS, bunches of particles are ejected to the outer region quasi-periodically, which is a possible mechanism of observed radio emission.
  • The Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor reported the possible detection of the gamma-ray counterpart of a binary black hole merger event, GW150914. We show that the gamma-ray emission is caused by a relativistic outflow with Lorentz factor larger than 10. Subsequently, debris outflow pushes the ambient gas to form a shock, which is responsible for the afterglow synchrotron emission. We find that the 1.4 GHz radio flux peaks at $\sim10^5$ sec after the burst trigger. If the ambient matter is dense enough with density larger than $\sim10^{-2}$ cm$^{-3}$, then the peak radio flux is $\sim0.1$ mJy, which is detectable with radio telescopes such as the Very Large Array. The optical afterglow peaks earlier than the radio, and if the ambient matter density is larger than $\sim0.1$ cm$^{-3}$, the optical flux is detectable with large telescopes such as the Subaru Hyper Suprime-Cam. To reveal the currently unknown mechanisms of the outflow and its gamma-ray emission associated with the binary black hole merger event, follow-up electromagnetic observations of afterglows are important. Detection of the afterglow will localize the sky position of the gravitational wave and the gamma-ray emissions, and it will support the physical association between them.
  • We study stochastic acceleration models for the Fermi bubbles. Turbulence is excited just behind the shock front via Kelvin--Helmholtz, Rayleigh--Taylor, or Richtmyer--Meshkov instabilities, and plasma particles are continuously accelerated by the interaction with the turbulence. The turbulence gradually decays as it goes away from the shock fronts. Adopting a phenomenological model for the stochastic acceleration, we explicitly solve the temporal evolution of the particle energy distribution in the turbulence. Our results show that the spatial distribution of high-energy particles is different from those for a steady solution. We also show that the contribution of electrons that escaped from the acceleration regions significantly softens the photon spectrum. The photon spectrum and surface brightness profile are reproduced by our models. If the escape efficiency is very high, the radio flux from the escaped low-energy electrons can be comparable to that of the WMAP haze. We also demonstrate hadronic models with the stochastic acceleration, but they are unlikely in the viewpoint of the energy budget.
  • The spectral shape of the prompt emissions of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) is typically expressed by the Band function: smooth joining of two power-law functions for high-energy and low-energy regions. To reveal the origin of the Band function, we revisit the stochastic acceleration model, in which electrons are accelerated via scattering with turbulent waves in the GRB outflow. The balance between the acceleration and synchrotron cooling yields a narrow energy-distribution similar to the Maxwellian distribution. The synchrotron spectrum becomes consistent with the observed hard photon index for the low-energy region. On the other hand, the narrow electron energy distribution contradicts the power-law spectrum for the high-energy region. We consider an evolution of the electron energy distribution to solve this problem. The turbulence and magnetic field induced by a certain hydrodynamical instability gradually decay. According to this evolution, the typical synchrotron photon energy also decreases with time. The time-integrated spectrum forms the power-law shape for the high-energy region. We discuss the required evolutions of the turbulence and magnetic field to produce a typical Band function. Although the decay of the turbulence is highly uncertain, recent numerical simulations for decaying turbulence seem comparatively positive for the stochastic acceleration model. Another condition required to reconcile observations is a much shorter duration of the stochastic acceleration than the dynamical timescale.
  • The very short and bright flare of 3C 279 detected with {\it Fermi}-LAT in 2013 December is tested by a model with stochastic electron acceleration by turbulences. Our time-dependent simulation shows that the very hard spectrum and asymmetric light curve are successfully reproduced by changing only the magnetic field from the value in the steady period. The maximum energy of electrons drastically grows with the decrease of the magnetic field, which yields a hard photon spectrum as observed. Rapid cooling due to the inverse-Compton scattering with the external photons reproduces the decaying feature of the light curve. The inferred energy density of the magnetic field is much less than the electron and photon energy densities. The low magnetic field and short variability timescale are unfavorable for the jet acceleration model from the gradual Poynting flux dissipation.
  • Gamma-Ray Bursts are the most energetic explosions in the Universe, and are among the most promising for detecting multiple non-electromagnetic signals, including cosmic rays, high energy neutrinos and gravitational waves. The multi-GeV to TeV gamma-ray range of GRB could have significant contributions from hadronic interactions, mixed with more conventional leptonic contributions. This energy range is important for probing the source physics, including overall energetics, the shock parameters and the Lorentz factor. We discuss some of the latest observational and theoretical developments in the field.
  • Induced Compton scattering (ICS) is an interaction between intense electro-magnetic radiations and plasmas, where ICS transfers the energy from photons to plasmas. Although ICS is important for laser plasma interactions in laboratory experiments and for radio emission from pulsars propagating in pulsar wind plasmas, the detail of photon cooling process has not been understood. The problem is that, when ICS dominates, evolution of photon spectra is described as a nonlinear convection equation, which makes photon spectra to be multi-valued. Here, we propose a new approach to treat evolution of photon spectra affected by ICS. Starting from the higher-order Kompaneets equation, we find a new equation that resolves the unphysical behavior of photon spectra. In addition, we find the steady-state analytic solution, which is linearly stable. We also successfully simulate the evolution of photon spectra without artificial viscosity. We find that photons rapidly lose their energy by ICS with continuously forming solitary structures in frequency-space. The solitary structures have the logarithmically same width characterized by an electron temperature. The energy transfer from photons to plasma is more effective for broader spectrum of photons such as expected in astrophysical situations.
  • We examine the applicability of the stochastic electron acceleration to two high synchrotron peaked blazars, Mrk 421 and Mrk 501, assuming synchrotron self-Compton emission of gamma-rays. Our model considers an emitting region moving at relativistic speed, where non-thermal electrons are accelerated and attain a steady-state energy spectrum together with the photons they emit. The kinetic equations of the electrons and photons are solved numerically, given a stationary wave number spectrum of the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) disturbances, which are responsible for the electron acceleration and escape. Our simple formulation appears to reproduce the two well-sampled, long-term averaged photon spectra. In order to fit the model to the emission component from the radio to the X-ray bands, we need both a steeper wave spectral index than the Kolmogorov spectrum and efficient particle escape. Although the model provides a natural explanation for the high-energy cutoff of the electron energy distribution, the derived physical parameters raise a problem with an energy budget if the MHD waves with the Alfv{\'e}n velocity are assumed to be the acceleration agent.
  • We revisit the neutrino and ultra high-energy cosmic ray (UHECR) production from gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) with time-dependent simulations for the proton-induced cascades. This method can generate self-consistent photon, neutrino and escaped neutron spectra. To obtain the integrated background spectra, we take into account the distributions of the burst luminosity and pulse duration timescale. A benchmark case with standard GRB luminosity function, a bulk Lorentz factor $\Gamma=300$ and a proton to gamma-ray luminosity fraction $f_{\rm p}=10$, is consistent with both the neutrino upper-limits and the observed UHECR intensity at $\sim 10^{20}$ eV, while requiring a different type of UHECR source at the ankle. For the benchmark case the GRBs in the bright end of the luminosity function, which contribute most of the neutrinos, have their photon spectrum substantially distorted by secondary photons. Such bright GRBs are few in number, and reducing their $f_p$ eliminates the distortion, while reducing the neutrino production. Even if we neglect the contribution of the brightest GRBs, the UHECR production rate at GZK energies is almost unchanged. These nominal GRB models, especially with $L_{\rm iso} \lesssim 10^{53} ~\mbox{erg} ~\mbox{s}^{-1}$, appear to meet the current constraints as far as being candidate UHECR sources above the ankle energy.
  • The second-order Fermi acceleration (Fermi-II) driven by turbulence may be responsible for the electron acceleration in blazar jets. We test this model with time-dependent simulations. The hard electron spectrum predicted by the Fermi-II process agrees with the hard photon spectrum of 1ES 1101-232. For other blazars that show softer spectra, the Fermi-II model requires radial evolution of the electron injection rate and/or diffusion coefficient in the outflow. Such evolutions can yield a curved electron spectrum, which can reproduce the synchrotron spectrum of Mrk 421 from the radio to the X-ray regime.The photon spectrum in the GeV energy range of Mrk 421 is hard to fit with a synchrotron self-Compton model. However, if we introduce an external radio photon field with a luminosity of $4.9 \times 10^{38}~\mbox{erg}~\mbox{s}^{-1}$, GeV photons are successfully produced via inverse Compton scattering. The temporal variability of the diffusion coefficient or injection rate causes flare emission. The observed synchronicity of X-ray and TeV flares implies a decrease of the magnetic field in the flaring source region.
  • We present the results of the search for a correlation between giant radio pulses (GRPs) at 1.4 GHz and hard X-rays at 15-75 keV from the Crab pulsar. We made simultaneous ground and satellite observations of the Crab pulsar over 12 hours in three occasions in April 2010, March and September 2011, and got a sample of 1.3*10^4 main-pulse phase GRPs. From these samples we have found statistically marginal enhancement (21.5%, 2.70 sigma) of hard X-ray flux within +/- 1.5 degree phase angle of the synchronous peak of main-pulse phase GRPs. This enhancement, if confirmed, implicates that GRPs may accompany plasma density increases in the pulsar magnetosphere.
  • We outline the science prospects for gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) with the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA), the next-generation ground-based gamma-ray observatory operating at energies above few tens of GeV. With its low energy threshold, large effective area and rapid slewing capabilities, CTA will be able to measure the spectra and variability of GRBs at multi-GeV energies with unprecedented photon statistics, and thereby break new ground in elucidating the physics of GRBs, which is still poorly understood. Such measurements will also provide crucial diagnostics of ultra-high-energy cosmic ray and neutrino production in GRBs, advance observational cosmology by probing the high-redshift extragalactic background light and intergalactic magnetic fields, and contribute to fundamental physics by testing Lorentz invariance violation with high precision. Aiming to quantify these goals, we present some simulated observations of GRB spectra and light curves, together with estimates of their detection rates with CTA. Although the expected detection rate is modest, of order a few GRBs per year, hundreds or more high-energy photons per burst may be attainable once they are detected. We also address various issues related to following up alerts from satellites and other facilities with CTA, as well as follow-up observations at other wavelengths. The possibility of discovering and observing GRBs from their onset including short GRBs during a wide-field survey mode is also briefly discussed.
  • We calculate the high energy neutrino spectrum from gamma-ray bursts where the emission arises in a dissipative jet photosphere determined by either baryonically or magnetically dominated dynamics, and compare these neutrino spectra to those obtained in conventional internal shock models. We also calculate the diffuse neutrino spectra based on these models, which appear compatible with the current IceCube 40+59 constraints. While a re-analysis based on the models discussed here and the data from the full array would be needed, it appears that only those models with the most extreme parameters are close to being constrained at present. A multi-year operation of the full IceCube and perhaps a next generation of large volume neutrino detectors may be required in order to distinguish between the various models discussed.
  • Gamma-ray bursts are the most concentrated explosions in the Universe. They have been detected electromagnetically at energies up to tens of GeV, and it is suspected that they could be active at least up to TeV energies. It is also speculated that they could emit cosmic rays and neutrinos at energies reaching up to the $10^{18}-10^{20}$ eV range. Here we review the recent developments in the photon phenomenology in the light of \swift and \fermi satellite observations, as well as recent IceCube upper limits on their neutrino luminosity. We discuss some of the theoretical models developed to explain these observations and their possible contribution to a very high energy cosmic ray and neutrino background.
  • The temporal--spectral evolution of the prompt emission of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) is simulated numerically for both leptonic and hadronic models. For weak enough magnetic fields, leptonic models can reproduce the few seconds delay of the onset of GeV photon emission observed by Fermi-LAT, due to the slow growth of the target photon field for inverse Compton scattering. However, even for stronger magnetic fields, the GeV delay can be explained with hadronic models, due to the long acceleration timescale of protons and the continuous photopion production after the end of the particle injection. While the FWHMs of the MeV and GeV lightcurves are almost the same in one-zone leptonic models, the FWHM of the 1--30 GeV lightcurves in hadronic models are significantly wider than those of the 0.1--1 MeV lightcurves. The amount of the GeV delay depends on the importance of the Klein--Nishina effect in both the leptonic and hadronic models. In our examples of hadronic models the energies of the escaped neutrons are comparable to the gamma-ray energy, although their contribution to the ultra high-energy cosmic rays is still subdominant. The resulting neutrino spectra are hard enough to avoid the flux limit constraint from IceCube. The delay of the neutrino emission onset is up to several times longer than the corresponding delay of the GeV photon emission onset. The quantitative differences in the lightcurves for various models may be further tested with future atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes whose effective area is larger than that of Fermi-LAT, such as CTA.