• We report ALMA Cycle 3 observations in CO isotopes toward a dense core, MC27/L1521F in Taurus, which is considered to be at an early stage of multiple star formation in a turbulent environment. Although most of the high-density parts of this core are considered to be as cold as $\sim$10 K, high-angular resolution ($\sim$20 au) observations in $^{12}$CO ($J$ = 3$-$2) revealed complex warm ($>$15$-$60 K) filamentary/clumpy structures with the sizes from a few tens of au to $\sim$1,000 au. The interferometric observations of $^{13}$CO and C$^{18}$O show that the densest part with arc-like morphologies associated with previously identified protostar and condensations are slightly redshifted from the systemic velocity of the core. We suggest that the warm CO clouds may be consequences of shock heating induced by interactions among the different density/velocity components originated from the turbulent motions in the core, although how such a fast turbulent flow survives in this very dense medium remains to be studied. The high-angular resolution CO observations are expected to be essential in detecting small-scale turbulent motions in dense cores and to investigate protostar formation therein.
  • We present high-resolution (sub-parsec) observations of a giant molecular cloud in the nearest star-forming galaxy, the Large Magellanic Cloud. ALMA Band 6 observations trace the bulk of the molecular gas in $^{12}$CO(2-1) and high column density regions in $^{13}$CO(2-1). Our target is a quiescent cloud (PGCC G282.98-32.40, which we refer to as the "Planck cold cloud" or PCC) in the southern outskirts of the galaxy where star-formation activity is very low and largely confined to one location. We decompose the cloud into structures using a dendrogram and apply an identical analysis to matched-resolution cubes of the 30 Doradus molecular cloud (located near intense star formation) for comparison. Structures in the PCC exhibit roughly 10 times lower surface density and 5 times lower velocity dispersion than comparably sized structures in 30 Dor, underscoring the non-universality of molecular cloud properties. In both clouds, structures with relatively higher surface density lie closer to simple virial equilibrium, whereas lower surface density structures tend to exhibit super-virial line widths. In the PCC, relatively high line widths are found in the vicinity of an infrared source whose properties are consistent with a luminous young stellar object. More generally, we find that the smallest resolved structures ("leaves") of the dendrogram span close to the full range of line widths observed across all scales. As a result, while the bulk of the kinetic energy is found on the largest scales, the small-scale energetics tend to be dominated by only a few structures, leading to substantial scatter in observed size-linewidth relationships.
  • We report ALMA observations in 0.87 mm continuum and $^{12}$CO ($J$ = 3--2) toward a very low-luminosity ($<$0.1 $L_{\odot}$) protostar, which is deeply embedded in one of the densest core, MC27/L1521F, in Taurus with an indication of multiple star formation in a highly dynamical environment. The beam size corresponds to $\sim$20 AU, and we have clearly detected blueshifted/redshifted gas in $^{12}$CO associated with the protostar. The spatial/velocity distributions of the gas show there is a rotating disk with a size scale of $\sim$10 AU, a disk mass of $\sim$10$^{-4}$ $M_{\odot}$ and a central stellar mass of $\sim$0.2 $M_{\odot}$. The observed disk seems to be detachedfrom the surrounding dense gas although it is still embedded at the center of the core whose density is $\sim$10$^{6}$ cm$^{-3}$. The current low outflow activity and the very-low luminosity indicate that the mass accretion rate onto the protostar is extremely low in spite of a very early stage of star formation. We may be witnessing the final stage of the formation of $\sim$0.2 $M_{\odot}$ protostar. However, we cannot explain the observed low-luminosity with the standard pre-main-sequence evolutionary track, unless we assume cold accretion with an extremely small initial radius of the protostar ($\sim$0.65 $R_\odot$). These facts may challenge our current understanding of the low-mass star formation, in particular, the mass accretion process onto the protostar and the circumstellar disk.
  • The FOREST Unbiased Galactic plane Imaging survey with the Nobeyama 45-m telescope (FUGIN) project is one of the legacy projects using the new multi-beam FOREST receiver installed on the Nobeyama 45-m telescope. This project aims to investigate the distribution, kinematics, and physical properties of both diffuse and dense molecular gas in the Galaxy at once by observing 12CO, 13CO, and C18O J=1-0 lines simultaneously. The mapping regions are a part of the 1st quadrant (10d < l < 50d, |b| < 1d) and the 3rd quadrant (198d < l <236d, |b| < 1d) of the Galaxy, where spiral arms, bar structure, and the molecular gas ring are included. This survey achieves the highest angular resolution to date (~20") for the Galactic plane survey in the CO J=1-0 lines, which makes it possible to find dense clumps located farther away than the previous surveys. FUGIN will provide us with an invaluable dataset for investigating the physics of the galactic interstellar medium (ISM), particularly the evolution of interstellar gas covering galactic scale structures to the internal structures of giant molecular clouds, such as small filament/clump/core. We present an overview of the FUGIN project, observation plan, and initial results, which reveal wide-field and detailed structures of molecular clouds, such as entangled filaments that have not been obvious in previous surveys, and large-scale kinematics of molecular gas such as spiral arms.
  • We have performed Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) observations in $^{12}$CO($J=2-1$), $^{13}$CO($J=2-1$), C$^{18}$O($J=2-1$), $^{12}$CO($J=3-2$), $^{13}$CO($J=3-2$), and CS($J=7-6$) lines toward the active star-forming region N83C in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC), whose metallicity is $\sim$ 1/5 of the Milky Way (MW). The ALMA observations first reveal sub-pc scale molecular structures in $^{12}$CO($J=2-1$) and $^{13}$CO($J=2-1$) emission. We found strong CO peaks associated with young stellar objects (YSOs) identified by the $Spitzer$ Space Telescope, and also found that overall molecular gas is distributed along the edge of the neighboring HII region. We derived a gas density of $\sim 10^4$ cm$^{-3}$ in molecular clouds associated with YSOs based on the virial mass estimated from $^{12}$CO($J=2-1$) emission. This high gas density is presumably due to the effect of the HII region under the low-metallicity (accordingly small-dust content) environment in the SMC; far-UV radiation from the HII region can easily penetrate and photo-dissociate the outer layer of $^{12}$CO molecules in the molecular clouds, and thus only the innermost parts of the molecular clouds are observed even in $^{12}$CO emission. We obtained the CO-to-H$_2$ conversion factor $X_{\rm CO}$ of $7.5 \times 10^{20}$ cm$^{-2}$ (K km s$^{-1}$)$^{-1}$ in N83C based on virial masses and CO luminosities, which is four times larger than that in the MW, 2 $\times 10^{20}$ cm$^{-2}$ (K km s$^{-1}$)$^{-1}$. We also discuss the difference in the nature between two high-mass YSOs, each of which is associated with a molecular clump with a mass of about a few $\times 10^3 M_{\odot}$.
  • Massive molecular outflows erupting from high-mass young stellar objects provide important clues to understanding the mechanism of high-mass star formation. Based on new CO J=3-2 and J=1-0 observations using the Atacama Submillimeter Telescope Experiment (ASTE) and Mopra telescope facilities, we discovered a massive bipolar outflow associated with the dense dust core AGALG337.916-00.477 (AGAL337.9-S), located 3.48 kpc from the Sun. The outflow lobes have extensions of less than 1 pc -and thus were not fully resolved in the angular resolutions of ASTE and Mopra- and masses of 35-40 M_sun. The maximum velocities of the outflow lobes are as high as 35-40 km/s. Our analysis of the infrared and sub-mm data indicates that AGAL337.9-S is in an early evolutionary stage of the high-mass star formation, having the total far-infrared luminosity of ~5x10^4 L_sun. We also found that another dust core AGALG337.922-00.456 (AGAL337.9-N) located 2' north of AGAL337.9-S is a high-mass young stellar object in an earlier evolutional stage than AGAL337.9-S, although it is less bright in the mid-infrared than AGAL337.9-S.
  • We present the results of ALMA observations of dust continuum emission and molecular rotational lines toward a dense core MC27 (aka L1521F) in Taurus, which is considered to be at a very early stage of star formation. The detailed column density distribution on size scales from a few tens AU to ~10,000 AU scale are revealed by combining the ALMA (12 m array + 7 m array) data with the published/unpublished single-dish data. The high angular resolution observations at 0.87 mm with a synthesized beam size of ~0."74 x 0."32 reveal that a protostellar source, MMS-1, is not spatially resolved and lacks associated gas emission, while a starless high-density core, MMS-2, has substructures both in dust and molecular emission. The averaged radial column density distribution of the inner part of MC27/L1521F (r $\lesssim$ 3000 AU) is N(H2) ~r$^{-0.4}$, clearly flatter than that of the outer part, ~r$^{-1.0}$. The complex velocity/spatial structure obtained with previous ALMA observations is located inside the inner flatter region, which may reflect the dynamical status of the dense core.
  • We present the ALMA Band 3 and Band 6 results of 12CO(2-1), 13$CO(2-1), H30alpha recombination line, free-free emission around 98 GHz, and the dust thermal emission around 230 GHz toward the N159 East Giant Molecular Cloud (N159E) in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). LMC is the nearest active high-mass star forming face-on galaxy at a distance of 50 kpc and is the best target for studing high-mass star formation. ALMA observations show that N159E is the complex of filamentary clouds with the width and length of ~1 pc and 5 pc - 10 pc, respectively. The total molecular mass is 0.92 x 10^5 Msun from the 13CO(2-1) intensity. N159E harbors the well-known Papillon Nebula, a compact high-excitation HII region. We found that a YSO associated with the Papillon Nebula has the mass of 35 Msun and is located at the intersection of three filamentary clouds. It indicates that the formation of the high-mass YSO was induced by the collision of filamentary clouds. Fukui et al. 2015 reported a similar kinematic structure toward a YSO in the N159 West region which is another YSO that has the mass larger than 35 Msun in these two regions. This suggests that the collision of filamentary clouds is a primary mechanism of high-mass star formation. We found a small molecular hole around the YSO in Papillon Nebula with sub-pc scale. It is filled by free-free and H30alpha emission. Temperature of the molecular gas around the hole reaches ~ 80 K. It indicates that this YSO has just started the distruction of parental molecular cloud.
  • We developed a dual-linear-polarization HEMT (High Electron Mobility Transistor) amplifier receiver system of the 45-GHz band (hereafter Z45), and installed it in the Nobeyama 45-m radio telescope. The receiver system is designed to conduct polarization observations by taking the cross correlation of two linearly-polarized components, from which we process full-Stokes spectroscopy. We aim to measure the magnetic field strength through the Zeeman effect of the emission line of CCS ($J_N=4_3-3_2$) toward pre-protostellar cores. A linear-polarization receiver system has a smaller contribution of instrumental polarization components to the Stokes $V$ spectra than that of the circular polarization system, so that it is easier to obtain the Stokes $V$ spectra. The receiver has an RF frequency of 42 $-$ 46 GHz and an intermediate frequency (IF) band of 4$-$8 GHz. The typical noise temperature is about 50 K, and the system noise temperature ranges from 100 K to 150K over the frequency of 42 $-$ 46 GHz. The receiver system is connected to two spectrometers, SAM45 and PolariS. SAM45 is a highly flexible FX-type digital spectrometer with a finest frequency resolution of 3.81 kHz. PolariS is a newly-developed digital spectrometer with a finest frequency resolution of 60 Hz, having a capability to process the full-Stokes spectroscopy. The Half Power Beam Width (HPBW) of the beam was measured to be 37$"$ at 43 GHz. The main beam efficiency of the Gaussian main beam was derived to be 0.72 at 43 GHz. The SiO maser observations show that the beam pattern is reasonably round at about 10 \% of the peak intensity and the side-lobe level was less than 3 \% of the peak intensity. Finally, we present some examples of astronomical observations using Z45.
  • We have carried out 13CO(J=2-1) observations of the active star-forming region N159 West in the LMC with ALMA. We have found that the CO distribution at a sub-pc scale is highly elongated with a small width. These elongated clouds called "filaments" show straight or curved distributions with a typical width of 0.5-1.0pc and a length of 5-10pc. All the known infrared YSOs are located toward the filaments. We have found broad CO wings of two molecular outflows toward young high-mass stars in N159W-N and N159W-S, whose dynamical timescale is ~10^4 yrs. This is the first discovery of protostellar outflow in external galaxies. For N159W-S which is located toward an intersection of two filaments we set up a hypothesis that the two filaments collided with each other ~10^5 yrs ago and triggered formation of the high-mass star having ~37 Mo. The colliding clouds show significant enhancement in linewidth in the intersection, suggesting excitation of turbulence in the shocked interface layer between them as is consistent with the magneto-hydro-dynamical numerical simulations (Inoue & Fukui 2013). This turbulence increases the mass accretion rate to ~6x10^-4 Mo yr^-1, which is required to overcome the stellar feedback to form the high-mass star.
  • We investigated the formation of arc-like structures in the infalling envelope around protostars, motivated by the recent Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array (ALMA) observations of the high-density molecular cloud core, MC27/L1521F. We performed self-gravitational hydrodynamical numerical simulations with an adaptive mesh refinement code. A filamentary cloud with a 0.1~pc width fragments into cloud cores because of perturbations due to weak turbulence. The cloud core undergoes gravitational collapse to form multiple protostars, and gravitational torque from the orbiting protostars produces arc structures extending up to a 1000~AU scale. As well as on a spatial extent, the velocity ranges of the arc structures, $\sim0.5\,\mathrm{km\,s}^{-1}$, are in agreement with the ALMA observations. We also found that circumstellar disks are often misaligned in triple system. The misalignment is caused by the tidal interaction between the protostars when they undergo close encounters because of a highly eccentric orbit of the tight binary pair.
  • The Serpens South infrared dark cloud consists of several filamentary ridges, some of which fragment into dense clumps. On the basis of CCS ($J_N=4_3-3_2$), HC$_3$N ($J=5-4$), N$_2$H$^+$ ($J=1-0$), and SiO ($J=2-1, v=0$) observations, we investigated the kinematics and chemical evolution of these filamentary ridges. We find that CCS is extremely abundant along the main filament in the protocluster clump. We emphasize that Serpens South is the first cluster-forming region where extremely-strong CCS emission is detected. The CCS-to-N$_2$H$^+$ abundance ratio is estimated to be about 0.5 toward the protocluster clump, whereas it is about 3 in the other parts of the main filament. We identify six dense ridges with different $V_{\rm LSR}$. These ridges appear to converge toward the protocluster clump, suggesting that the collisions of these ridges may have triggered cluster formation. The collisions presumably happened within a few $\times \ 10^5$ yr because CCS is abundant only in such a short time. The short lifetime agrees with the fact that the number fraction of Class I objects, whose typical lifetime is $0.4 \times \ 10^5$ yr, is extremely high as about 70 percent in the protocluster clump. In the northern part, two ridges appear to have partially collided, forming a V-shape clump. In addition, we detected strong bipolar SiO emission that is due to the molecular outflow blowing out of the protostellar clump, as well as extended weak SiO emission that may originate from the filament collisions.
  • Starless dense cores eventually collapse dynamically, which forms protostars inside them, and the physical properties of the cores determine the nature of the forming protostars. We report ALMA observations of dust continuum emission and molecular rotational lines toward MC27 or L1521F, which is considered to be very close to the first protostellar core phase. We found a few starless high-density cores, one of which has a very high density of ~10^7 cm^-3, within a region of several hundred AU around a very low-luminosity protostar detected by Spitzer. A very compact bipolar outflow with a dynamical timescale of a few hundred years was found toward the protostar. The molecular line observation shows several cores with an arc-like structure, possibly due to the dynamical gas interaction. These complex structures revealed in the present observations suggest that the initial condition of star formation is highly dynamical in nature, which is considered to be a key factor in understanding fundamental issues of star formation such as the formation of multiple stars and the origin of the initial mass function of stars.