• Bikesharing schemes are transportation systems that not only provide an efficient mode of transportation in congested urban areas, but also improve last-mile connectivity with public transportation and local accessibility. Bikesharing schemes around the globe generate detailed trip data sets with spatial and temporal dimensions, which, with proper mining and analysis, reveal valuable information on urban mobility patterns. In this paper, we study the London bicycle sharing dataset to explore community structures. Using a novel clustering technique, we derive distinctive behavioural patterns and assess community interactions and spatio-temporal dynamics. The analyses reveal self-contained, interconnected and hybrid clusters that mimic London's physical structure. Exploring changes over time, we find geographically isolated and specialized communities to be relatively consistent, while the remaining system exhibits volatility, especially during and around peak commuting times. By increasing our understanding of the collective behaviour of the bikesharing users, this analysis supports policy appraisal, operational decision-making and motivates improvements in infrastructure design and management.
  • We report the design, construction, and initial commissioning results of a large high pressure gaseous Time Projection Chamber (TPC) with Micromegas modules for charge readout. The detector vessel has an inner volume of about 600 L and an active volume of 270 L. At 10 bar operating pressure, the active volume contains about 20 kg of xenon gas and can image charged particle tracks. Drift electrons are collected by the charge readout plane, which accommodates a tessellation of seven Micromegas modules. Each of the Micromegas covers a square of 20 cm by 20 cm. A new type of Microbulk Micromegas is chosen for this application due to its good gain uniformity and low radioactive contamination. Initial commissioning results with 1 Micromegas module running with 1 bar argon and isobutane gas mixture and 5 bar xenon and trimethylamine (TMA) gas mixture are reported. We also recorded extended background tracks from cosmic ray events and highlighted the unique tracking feature of this gaseous TPC.
  • Self-Interacting Dark Matter (SIDM) is a leading candidate to solve the puzzles of the cold dark matter paradigm on galactic scales. We present a particle-physics study on SIDM models in PandaX-II, a direct detection experiment in China JinPing underground Laboratory. We use data collected in 2016 and 2017 runs, corresponding to a total exposure of 54 ton day, the largest published data set of its kind to date. Strong combined limits are set on the mass of the dark-force mediator, its mixing with the standard model particles, and the mass of dark matter. Together with considerations from the Big-Bang Nucleosynthesis, our results put tight constraints on SIDM models.
  • The PandaX-III experiment will search for neutrinoless double beta decay of $^{136}$Xe with high pressure gaseous time projection chambers at the China Jin-Ping underground Laboratory. The tracking feature of gaseous detectors helps suppress the background level, resulting in the improvement of the detection sensitivity. We study a method based on the convolutional neural networks to discriminate double beta decay signals against the background from high energy gamma generated by $^{214}$Bi and $^{208}$Tl decays. Using the 2-dimensional projections of recorded tracks on two planes, the method successfully suppresses the background level by a factor larger than 100 with a high signal efficiency. An improvement of $62\%$ on the efficiency ratio of $\epsilon_{s}/\sqrt{\epsilon_{b}}$ is achieved in comparison with the baseline in the PandaX-III conceptual design report.
  • We report here the results of searching for inelastic scattering of dark matter (initial and final state dark matter particles differ by a small mass splitting) with nucleon with the first 79.6-day of PandaX-II data (Run 9). We set the upper limits for the spin independent WIMP-nucleon scattering cross section up to a mass splitting of 300 keV/c$^2$ at two benchmark dark matter masses of 1 and 10 TeV/c$^2$.
  • We report new searches for the solar axions and galactic axion-like dark matter particles, using the first low-background data from PandaX-II experiment at China Jinping Underground Laboratory, corresponding to a total exposure of about $2.7\times 10^4$ kg$\cdot$day. No solar axion or galactic axion-like dark matter particle candidate has been identified. The upper limit on the axion-electron coupling ($g_{Ae}$) from the solar flux is found to be about $4.35 \times 10^{-12}$ in mass range from $10^{-5}$ to 1 keV/$c^2$ with 90\% confidence level, similar to the recent LUX result. We also report a new best limit from the $^{57}$Fe de-excitation. On the other hand, the upper limit from the galactic axions is on the order of $10^{-13}$ in the mass range from 1 keV/$c^2$ to 10 keV/$c^2$ with 90\% confidence level, slightly improved compared with the LUX.
  • We report a new search of weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) using the combined low background data sets in 2016 and 2017 from the PandaX-II experiment in China. The latest data set contains a new exposure of 77.1 live day, with the background reduced to a level of 0.8$\times10^{-3}$ evt/kg/day, improved by a factor of 2.5 in comparison to the previous run in 2016. No excess events were found above the expected background. With a total exposure of 5.4$\times10^4$ kg day, the most stringent upper limit on spin-independent WIMP-nucleon cross section was set for a WIMP with mass larger than 100 GeV/c$^2$, with the lowest exclusion at 8.6$\times10^{-47}$ cm$^2$ at 40 GeV/c$^2$.
  • Air traffic is widely known as a complex, task-critical techno-social system, with numerous interactions between airspace, procedures, aircraft and air traffic controllers. In order to develop and deploy high-level operational concepts and automation systems scientifically and effectively, it is essential to conduct an in-depth investigation on the intrinsic traffic-human dynamics and characteristics, which is not widely seen in the literature. To fill this gap, we propose a multi-layer network to model and analyze air traffic systems. A Route-based Airspace Network (RAN) and Flight Trajectory Network (FTN) encapsulate critical physical and operational characteristics; an Integrated Flow-Driven Network (IFDN) and Interrelated Conflict-Communication Network (ICCN) are formulated to represent air traffic flow transmissions and intervention from air traffic controllers, respectively. Furthermore, a set of analytical metrics including network variables, complex network attributes, controllers' cognitive complexity, and chaotic metrics are introduced and applied in a case study of Guangzhou terminal airspace. Empirical results show the existence of fundamental diagram and macroscopic fundamental diagram at the route, sector and terminal levels. Moreover, the dynamics and underlying mechanisms of "ATCOs-flow" interactions are revealed and interpreted by adaptive meta-cognition strategies based on network analysis of the ICCN. Finally, at the system level, chaos is identified in conflict system and human behavioral system when traffic switch to the semi-stable or congested phase. This study offers analytical tools for understanding the complex human-flow interactions at potentially a broad range of air traffic systems, and underpins future developments and automation of intelligent air traffic management systems.
  • New constraints are presented on the spin-dependent WIMP-nucleon interaction from the PandaX-II experiment, using a data set corresponding to a total exposure of 3.3$\times10^4$ kg-days. Assuming a standard axial-vector spin-dependent WIMP interaction with $^{129}$Xe and $^{131}$Xe nuclei, the most stringent upper limits on WIMP-neutron cross sections for WIMPs with masses above 10 GeV/c$^{2}$ are set in all dark matter direct detection experiments. The minimum upper limit of $4.1\times 10^{-41}$ cm$^2$ at 90\% confidence level is obtained for a WIMP mass of 40 GeV/c$^{2}$. This represents more than a factor of two improvement on the best available limits at this and higher masses. These improved cross-section limits provide more stringent constraints on the effective WIMP-proton and WIMP-neutron couplings.
  • No-insulation (NI) REBCO magnets have many advantages. They are self-protecting, therefore do not need quench detection and protection which can be very challenging in a high Tc superconducting magnet. Moreover, by removing insulation and allowing thinner copper stabilizer, NI REBCO magnets have significantly higher engineering current density and higher mechanical strength. On the other hand, NI REBCO magnets have drawbacks of long magnet charging time and high field-ramp-loss. In principle, these drawbacks can be mitigated by managing the turn-to-turn contact resistivity (Rc). Evidently the first step toward managing Rc is to establish a reliable method of accurate Rc measurement. In this paper, we present experimental Rc measurements of REBCO tapes as a function of mechanical load up to 144 MPa and load cycles up to 14 times. We found that Rc is in the range of 26-100 uOhm-cm2; it decreases with increasing pressure, and gradually increases with number of load cycles. The results are discussed in the framework of Holm's electric contact theory.
  • Variable message sign (VMS) is an effective traffic management tool for congestion mitigation. The VMS is primarily used as a means of providing factual travel information or genuine route guidance to travelers. However, this may be rendered sub-optimal on a network level by potential network paradoxes and lack of consideration for its cascading effect on the rest of the network. This paper focuses on the design of optimal display strategy of VMS in response to real-time traffic information and its coordination with other intelligent transportation systems such as signal control, in order to explore the full potential of real-time route guidance in combating congestion. We invoke the linear decision rule framework to design the optimal on-line VMS strategy, and test its effectiveness in conjunction with on-line signal control. A simulation case study is conducted on a real-world test network in China, which shows the advantage of the proposed adaptive VMS display strategy over genuine route guidance, as well as its synergies with on-line signal control for congestion mitigation.
  • Searching for the Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay (NLDBD) is now regarded as the topmost promising technique to explore the nature of neutrinos after the discovery of neutrino masses in oscillation experiments. PandaX-III (Particle And Astrophysical Xenon Experiment III) will search for the NLDBD of $^{136}$Xe at the China Jin Ping underground Laboratory (CJPL). In the first phase of the experiment, a high pressure gas Time Projection Chamber (TPC) will contain 200 kg, 90% $^{136}$Xe enriched gas operated at 10 bar. Fine pitch micro-pattern gas detector (Microbulk Micromegas) will be used at both ends of the TPC for the charge readout with a cathode in the middle. Charge signals can be used to reconstruct tracks of NLDBD events and provide good energy and spatial resolution. The detector will be immersed in a large water tank to ensure $\sim$5 m of water shielding in all directions. The second phase, a ton-scale experiment, will consist of five TPCs in the same water tank, with improved energy resolution and better control over backgrounds.
  • We present a continuous-time link-based kinematic wave model (LKWM) for dynamic traffic networks based on the scalar conservation law model. Derivation of the LKWM involves the variational principle for the Hamilton-Jacobi equation and junction models defined via the notions of demand and supply. We show that the proposed LKWM can be formulated as a system of differential algebraic equations (DAEs), which captures shock formation and propagation, as well as queue spillback. The DAE system, as we show in this paper, is the continuous-time counterpart of the link transmission model. In addition, we present a solution existence theory for the continuous-time network model and investigate continuous dependence of the solution on the initial data, a property known as well-posedness. We test the DAE system extensively on several small and large networks and demonstrate its numerical efficiency.
  • This paper is concerned with the existence of the simultaneous route-and-departure choice dynamic user equilibrium (SRDC-DUE) in continuous time, first formulated as an infinite-dimensional variational inequality in Friesz et al. (1993). In deriving our existence result, we employ the generalized Vickrey model (GVM) introduced in and to formulate the underlying network loading problem. As we explain, the GVM corresponds to a path delay operator that is provably strongly continuous on the Hilbert space of interest. Finally, we provide the desired SRDC-DUE existence result for general constraints relating path flows to a table of fixed trip volumes without invocation of a priori bounds on the path flows.
  • Mobile sensing enabled by GPS or smart phones has become an increasingly important source of traffic data. For sufficient coverage of the traffic stream, it is important to maintain a reasonable penetration rate of probe vehicles. From the standpoint of capturing higher-order traffic quantities such as acceleration/deceleration, emission and fuel consumption rates, it is desirable to examine the impact on the estimation accuracy of sampling frequency on vehicle position. Of the two issues raised above, the latter is rarely studied in the literature. This paper addresses the impact of both sampling frequency and penetration rate on mobile sensing of highway traffic. To capture inhomogeneous driving conditions and deviation of traffic from the equilibrium state, we employ the second-order phase transition model (PTM). Several data fusion schemes that incorporate vehicle trajectory data into the PTM are proposed. And, a case study of the NGSIM dataset is presented which shows the estimation results of various Eulerian and Lagrangian traffic quantities. The findings show that while first-order traffic quantities can be accurately estimated even with a low sampling frequency, higher-order traffic quantities, such as acceleration, deviation, and emission rate, tend to be misinterpreted due to insufficiently sampled vehicle locations. We also show that a correction factor approach has the potential to reduce the sensing error arising from low sampling frequency and penetration rate, making the estimation of higher-order quantities more robust against insufficient data coverage of the highway traffic.
  • This paper is concerned with dynamic user equilibrium with elastic travel demand (E-DUE) when the trip demand matrix is determined endogenously. We present an infinite-dimensional variational inequality (VI) formulation that is equivalent to the conditions defining a continuous-time E-DUE problem. An existence result for this VI is established by applying a fixed-point existence theorem (Browder, 1968) in an extended Hilbert space. We present three algorithms based on the aforementioned VI and its re-expression as a differential variational inequality (DVI): a projection method, a self-adaptive projection method, and a proximal point method. Rigorous convergence results are provided for these methods, which rely on increasingly relaxed notions of generalized monotonicity, namely mixed strongly-weakly monotonicity for the projection method; pseudomonotonicity for the self-adaptive projection method, and quasimonotonicity for the proximal point method. These three algorithms are tested and their solution quality, convergence, and computational efficiency compared. Our convergence results, which transcend the transportation applications studied here, apply to a broad family of infinite-dimensional VIs and DVIs, and are the weakest reported to date.
  • We consider a continuous supply chain network consisting of buffering queues and processors first proposed by [D. Armbruster, P. Degond, and C. Ringhofer, SIAM J. Appl. Math., 66 (2006), pp. 896--920] and subsequently analyzed by [D. Armbruster, P. Degond, and C. Ringhofer, Bull. Inst. Math. Acad. Sin. (N.S.), 2 (2007), pp. 433--460] and [D. Armbruster, C. De Beer, M. Freitag, T. Jagalski, and C. Ringhofer, Phys. A, 363 (2006), pp. 104--114]. A model was proposed for such a network by [S. G\"ottlich, M. Herty, and A. Klar, Commun. Math. Sci., 3 (2005), pp. 545--559] using a system of coupling ordinary differential equations and partial differential equations. In this article, we propose an alternative approach based on a variational method to formulate the network dynamics. We also derive, based on the variational method, a computational algorithm that guarantees numerical stability, allows for rigorous error estimates, and facilitates efficient computations. A class of network flow optimization problems are formulated as mixed integer programs (MIPs). The proposed numerical algorithm and the corresponding MIP are compared theoretically and numerically with existing ones [A. F\"ugenschuh, S. G\"ottlich, M. Herty, A. Klar, and A. Martin, SIAM J. Sci. Comput., 30 (2008), pp. 1490--1507; S. G\"ottlich, M. Herty, and A. Klar, Commun. Math. Sci., 3 (2005), pp. 545--559], which demonstrates the modeling and computational advantages of the variational approach.
  • In this paper we present a differential variational inequality formulation of dynamic network user equilibrium with elastic travel demand. We discuss its qualitative properties and provide algorithms for and examples of its solution.
  • We consider an analytical signal control problem on a signalized network whose traffic flow dynamic is described by the Lighthill-Whitham-Richards (LWR) model (Lighthill and Whitham, 1955; Richards, 1956). This problem explicitly addresses traffic-derived emissions as side constraints. We seek to tackle this problem using a mixed integer mathematical programming approach. Such a class of problems, which we call LWR-Emission (LWR-E), has been analyzed before to certain extent. Since mixed integer programs are practically efficient to solve in many cases (Bertsimas et al., 2011b), the mere fact of having integer variables is not the most significant challenge to solving LWR-E problems; rather, it is the presence of the potentially nonlinear and nonconvex emission-related constraints/objectives that render the program computationally expensive. To address this computational challenge, we proposed a novel reformulation of the LWR-E problem as a mixed integer linear program (MILP). This approach relies on the existence of a statistically valid macroscopic relationship between the aggregate emission rate and the vehicle occupancy of the same link. This relationship is approximated with certain functional forms and the associated uncertainties are handled explicitly using robust optimization (RO) techniques. The RO allows emissions-related constraints and/or objectives to be reformulated as linear forms under mild conditions. To further reduce the computational cost, we employ the link transmission model to describe traffic dynamics with the benefit of fewer (integer) variables and less potential traffic holding. The proposed MILP explicitly captures vehicle spillback, avoids traffic holding, and simultaneously minimizes travel delay and addresses emission-related concerns.
  • This paper is concerned with a conservation law model of traffic flow on a network of roads, where each driver chooses his own departure time in order to minimize the sum of a departure cost and an arrival cost. The model includes various groups of drivers, with different origins and destinations and having different cost functions. Under a natural set of assumptions, two main results are proved: (i) the existence of a globally optimal solution, minimizing the sum of the costs to all drivers, and (ii) the existence of a Nash equilibrium solution, where no driver can lower his own cost by changing his departure time or the route taken to reach destination. In the case of Nash solutions, all departure rates are uniformly bounded and have compact support.
  • This paper establishes the continuity of the path delay operators for dynamic network loading (DNL) problems based on the Lighthill-Whitham-Richards model, which explicitly capture vehicle spillback. The DNL describes and predicts the spatial-temporal evolution of traffic flow and congestion on a network that is consistent with established route and departure time choices of travelers. The LWR-based DNL model is first formulated as a system of partial differential algebraic equations (PDAEs). We then investigate the continuous dependence of merge and diverge junction models with respect to their initial/boundary conditions, which leads to the continuity of the path delay operator through the wave-front tracking methodology and the generalized tangent vector technique. As part of our analysis leading up to the main continuity result, we also provide an estimation of the minimum network supply without resort to any numerical computation. In particular, it is shown that gridlock can never occur in a finite time horizon in the DNL model.
  • This paper analyzes simultaneous route-and-departure-time (SRDT) dynamic user equilibrium (DUE) that incorporates the notion of boundedly rational (BR) user behavior in the selection of departure time and route choices. Intrinsically, the boundedly rational dynamic user equilibrium (BR-DUE) model we present assumes that travelers do not always seek the least costly route-and-departure-time choice. Rather, their perception of travel cost is affected by an indifference band describing travelers' tolerance of the difference between their experienced travel costs and the minimum travel cost. An extension of the BR-DUE problem is the so-called variable tolerance dynamic user equilibrium (VT-BR-DUE) wherein endogenously determined tolerances may depend not only on paths, but also on the established path departure rates. This paper presents a unified approach for modeling both BR-DUE and VT-BR-DUE, which makes significant contributions to model formulation, analysis of existence, solution characterization, and heuristic numerical computation of such problems. The VT-BR-DUE problem, together with the BR-DUE problem as a special case, is formulated as a variational inequality. We provide a very general existence result for VT-BR-DUE and BR-DUE that relies on assumptions weaker than those required for mere DUE models. Moreover, a characterization of the solution set is provided based on rigorous topological analysis. Finally, three computational algorithms are proposed based on the VI and DVI formulations. Numerical studies are conducted to assess the proposed algorithms in terms of solution quality, convergence, and computational efficiency.
  • In the modeling of traffic networks, a signalized junction is typically treated using a binary variable to model the on-and-off nature of signal operation. While accurate, the use of binary variables can cause problems when studying large networks with many intersections. Instead, the signal control can be approximated through a continuum approach where the on-and-off control variable is replaced by a priority parameter. Advantages of such approximation include elimination of the need for binary variables, lower time resolution requirements, and more flexibility and robustness in a decision environment. It also resolves the issue of discontinuous travel time functions arising from the context of dynamic traffic assignment. Despite these advantages in application, it is not clear from a theoretical point of view how accurate is such continuum approach; i.e., to what extent is this a valid approximation for the on-and-off case. The goal of this paper is to answer these basic research questions and provide further guidance for the application of such continuum signal model. In particular, by employing the Lighthill-Whitham-Richards model (Lighthill and Whitham, 1955; Richards, 1956) on a traffic network, we investigate the convergence of the on-and-off signal model to the continuum model in regimes of diminishing signal cycles. We also provide numerical analyses on the continuum approximation error when the signal cycles are not infinitesimal. As we explain, such convergence results and error estimates depend on the type of fundamental diagram assumed and whether or not vehicle spillback occurs in a network. Finally, a traffic signal optimization problem is presented and solved which illustrates the unique advantages of applying the continuum signal model instead of the on-and-off one.
  • This paper is concerned with a dynamic traffic network performance model, known as dynamic network loading (DNL), that is frequently employed in the modeling and computation of analytical dynamic user equilibrium (DUE). As a key component of continuous-time DUE models, DNL aims at describing and predicting the spatial-temporal evolution of traffic flows on a network that is consistent with established route and departure time choices of travelers, by introducing appropriate dynamics to flow propagation, flow conservation, and travel delays. The DNL procedure gives rise to the path delay operator, which associates a vector of path flows (path departure rates) with the corresponding path travel costs. In this paper, we establish strong continuity of the path delay operator for networks whose arc flows are described by the link delay model (Friesz et al., 1993). Unlike result established in Zhu and Marcotte (2000), our continuity proof is constructed without assuming a priori uniform boundedness of the path flows. Such a more general continuity result has a few important implications to the existence of simultaneous route-and-departure choice DUE without a priori boundedness of path flows, and to any numerical algorithm that allows convergence to be rigorously analyzed.
  • This paper is concerned with dynamic user equilibrium (DUE) with elastic travel demand (E-DUE). We present and prove a variational inequality (VI) formulation of E-DUE using measure-theoretic argument. Moreover, existence of the E-DUE is formally established with a version of Brouwer's fixed point theorem in a properly defined Hilbert space. The existence proof requires the effective delay operator to be continuous, a regularity condition also needed to ensure the existence of DUE with fixed demand (Han et al., 2013c). Our proof does not invoke the a priori upper bound of the departure rates (path flows).