• Strong coupling between light and matter occurs when the two interact strongly enough to form new hybrid modes called polaritons. Here we report on the strong coupling of both the electric and magnetic degrees of freedom to an ultrafast terahertz (THz) frequency electromagnetic wave. In our system, optical phonons in a slab of ferroelectric lithium niobate (LiNbO$_3$) are strongly coupled to a THz electric field to form phonon-polaritons, which are simultaneously strongly coupled to magnons in an adjacent slab of canted antiferromagnetic erbium orthoferrite (ErFeO$_3$) via the THz magnetic field. The strong coupling leads to the formation of new magnon-phonon-polariton modes, which we experimentally observe in the wavevector-frequency dispersion curve as an avoided crossing and in the time-domain as a normal-mode beating. Our simple yet versatile on-chip waveguide platform provides a promising avenue by which to explore both ultrafast THz spintronics applications and the quantum nature of the interaction.
  • Excursions far from their equilibrium structures can bring crystalline solids through collective transformations including transitions into new phases that may be transient or long-lived. Direct spectroscopic observation of far-from-equilibrium rearrangements provides fundamental mechanistic insight into chemical and structural transformations, and a potential route to practical applications, including ultrafast optical control over material structure and properties. However, in many cases photoinduced transitions are irreversible or only slowly reversible, or the light fluence required exceeds material damage thresholds. This precludes conventional ultrafast spectroscopy in which optical excitation and probe pulses irradiate the sample many times, each measurement providing information about the sample response at just one probe delay time following excitation, with each measurement at a high repetition rate and with the sample fully recovering its initial state in between measurements. Using a single-shot, real-time measurement method, we were able to observe the photoinduced phase transition from the semimetallic, low-symmetry phase of crystalline bismuth into a high-symmetry phase whose existence at high electronic excitation densities was predicted based on earlier measurements at moderate excitation densities below the damage threshold. Our observations indicate that coherent lattice vibrational motion launched upon photoexcitation with an incident fluence above 10 mJ/cm2 in bulk bismuth brings the lattice structure directly into the high-symmetry configuration for tens of picoseconds, after which carrier relaxation and diffusion restore the equilibrium lattice configuration.
  • We demonstrate single-shot multi-frame imaging of quasi-2D cylindrically converging shock waves as they propagate through a multi-layer target sample assembly. We visualize the shock with sequences of up to 16 images, using a Fabry-Perot cavity to generate a pulse train that can be used in various imaging configurations. We employ multi-frame shadowgraph and dark-field imaging to measure the amplitude and phase of the light transmitted through the shocked target. Single-shot multi-frame imaging tracks geometric distortion and additional features in our images that were not previously resolvable in this experimental geometry. Analysis of our images, in combination with simulations, shows that the additional image features are formed by a coupled wave structure resulting from interface effects in our targets. This technique presents a new capability for tabletop imaging of shock waves that can be easily extended to experiments at large-scale facilities.
  • We present an optical technique based on ultrafast photoacoustics to precisely determine the local temperature distribution profile in liquid samples in contact with a laser heated optical transducer. This ultrafast pump-probe experiment uses time-domain Brillouin scattering (TDBS) to locally determine the light scattering frequency shift. As the temperature influences the Brillouin scattering frequency, the TDBS signal probes the local laser-induced temperature distribution in the liquid. We demonstrate the relevance and the sensitivity of this technique for the measurement of the absolute laser-induced temperature gradient of a glass forming liquid prototype, glycerol, at different laser pump powers - i.e. different steady state background temperatures. Complementarily, our experiments illustrate how this TDBS technique can be applied to measure thermal diffusion in complex multilayer systems in contact to a surrounding liquid.
  • We study nondiffusive thermal transport by phonons at small distances within the framework of the Boltzmann transport equation (BTE) and demonstrate that the transport is significantly affected by the distribution of phonons emitted by the source. We discuss analytical solutions of the steady-state BTE for a source with a sinusoidal spatial profile, as well as for a three- dimensional Gaussian hot spot, and provide numerical results for single crystal silicon at room temperature. If a micro/nanoscale heat source produces a thermal phonon distribution, it gets hotter than predicted by the heat diffusion equation; however, if the source predominantly produces low-frequency acoustic phonons with long mean free paths, it may get significantly cooler than predicted by the heat equation, yielding an enhanced heat transport.
  • The ideas of topology have found tremendous success in Hermitian physical systems, but even richer properties exist in the more general non-Hermitian framework. Here, we theoretically propose and experimentally demonstrate a new topologically-protected bulk Fermi arc which---unlike the well-known surface Fermi arcs arising from Weyl points in Hermitian systems---develops from non-Hermitian radiative losses in photonic crystal slabs. Moreover, we discover half-integer topological charges in the polarization of far-field radiation around the Fermi arc. We show that both phenomena are direct consequences of the non-Hermitian topological properties of exceptional points, where resonances coincide in their frequencies and linewidths. Our work connects the fields of topological photonics, non-Hermitian physics and singular optics, and paves the way for future exploration of non-Hermitian topological systems.
  • A supervised machine learning algorithm, called locally adaptive discriminant analysis (LADA), has been developed to locate boundaries between identifiable image features that have varying intensities. LADA is an adaptation of image segmentation, which includes techniques that find the positions of image features (classes) using statistical intensity distributions for each class in the image. In order to place a pixel in the proper class, LADA considers the intensity at that pixel and the distribution of intensities in local (nearby) pixels. This paper presents the use of LADA to provide, with statistical uncertainties, the positions and shapes of features within ultrafast images of shock waves. We demonstrate the ability to locate image features including crystals, density changes associated with shock waves, and material jetting caused by shock waves. This algorithm can analyze images that exhibit a wide range of physical phenomena because it does not rely on comparison to a model. LADA enables analysis of images from shock physics with statistical rigor independent of underlying models or simulations
  • Zero-field splitting (ZFS) parameters are fundamentally tied to the geometries of metal ion complexes. Despite their critical importance for understanding the magnetism and spectroscopy of metal complexes, they are not routinely available through general laboratory-based techniques, and are often inferred from magnetism data. Here we demonstrate a simple tabletop experimental approach that enables direct and reliable determination of ZFS parameters in the terahertz (THz) regime. We report time-domain measurements of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) signals associated with THz-frequency ZFSs in molecular complexes containing high-spin transition-metal ions. We measure the temporal profiles of the free-induction decays of spin resonances in the complexes at zero and nonzero external magnetic fields, and we derive the EPR spectra via numerical Fourier transformation of the time-domain signals. In most cases, absolute values of the ZFS parameters are extracted from the measured zero-field EPR frequencies, and the signs can be determined by zero-field measurements at two different temperatures. Field-dependent EPR measurements further allow refined determination of the ZFS parameters and access to the g-factor. The results show good agreement with those obtained by other methods. The simplicity of the method portends wide applicability in chemistry, biology and material science.
  • In this work, we demonstrate the correspondence between first principle calculations and experimental measurements of size effects on thermal transport in SiGe alloys. Transient thermal grating (TTG) is used to measure the effective thermal conductivity. The virtual crystal approximation under the density functional theory (DFT) framework combined with impurity scattering is used to determine the phonon properties for the exact alloy composition of the measured samples. With these properties, classical size effects are calculated for the experimental geometry of reflection mode TTG using the recently-developed variational solution to the phonon Boltzmann transport equation (BTE), which is verified against established Monte Carlo simulations. We find agreement between theoretical predictions and experimental measurements in the reduction of thermal conductivity (as much as $\sim$ 25\% of the bulk value) across grating periods spanning one order of magnitude. This work provides a framework for the tabletop study of size effects on thermal transport.
  • Diverse material classes exhibit practically identical behavior when made viscous upon cooling toward the glass transition, suggesting a common theoretical basis. The first-principles scaling laws that have been proposed to describe the evolution with temperature have yet to be appropriately tested due to the extraordinary range of time scales involved. We used seven different measurement methods to determine the structural relaxation kinetics of a prototype molecular glass former over a temporal range of 13 decades and over a temperature range spanning liquid to glassy states. For the material studied, our results comprise a comprehensive validation of the two scaling relations that are central to the fundamental question of whether supercooled liquid dynamics can be described universally. The ultrabroadband mechanical measurements demonstrated have fundamental and practical applications in polymer science, geophysics, multifunctional materials, and other areas.
  • Understanding material behavior under high velocity impact is the key to addressing a variety of fundamental questions in areas ranging from asteroid strikes and geological cratering to impact-induced phase transformations, spallation, wear, and ballistic penetration. Recently, adhesion has emerged in this spectrum since it has been found that micrometer-sized metallic particles can bond to metallic substrates under supersonic-impact conditions. However, the mechanistic aspects of impact-induced adhesion are still unresolved. Here we study supersonic impact of individual metallic microparticles on substrates with micro-scale and nanosecond-level resolution. This permits the first direct observation of a material-dependent threshold velocity, above which the particle undergoes impact-induced material ejection and adheres to the substrate. Our finite element simulations reveal that prevailing theories of impact-induced shear localization and melting cannot account for the material ejection. Rather, it originates from the propagation of a pressure wave induced upon impact. The experiments and simulations together establish that the critical adhesion velocity for supersonic microparticles is proportional to the bulk speed of sound.
  • Exciton-polaritons in semiconductor microcavities have been used to demonstrate quantum effects such as Bose-Einstein condensation, superfluity, and quantized vortices. However, in these experiments, the polaritons have not reached thermal equilibrium when they undergo the transition to a coherent state. This has prevented the verification of one of the canonical predictions for condensation, namely the phase diagram. In this work, we have created a polariton gas in a semiconductor microcavity in which the quasiparticles have a lifetime much longer than their thermalization time. This allows them to reach thermal equilibrium in a laser-generated confining trap. Their energy distributions are well fit by equilibrium Bose-Einstein distributions over a broad range of densities and temperatures from very low densities all the way up to the threshold for Bose-Einstein condensation. The good fits of the Bose-Einstein distribution over a broad range of density and temperature imply that the particles obey the predicted power law for the phase boundary of Bose-Einstein condensation.
  • Studying thermal transport at the nanoscale poses formidable experimental challenges due both to the physics of the measurement process and to the issues of accuracy and reproducibility. The laser-induced transient thermal grating (TTG) technique permits non-contact measurements on nanostructured samples without a need for metal heaters or any other extraneous structures, offering the advantage of inherently high absolute accuracy. We present a review of recent studies of thermal transport in nanoscale silicon membranes using the TTG technique. An overview of the methodology, including an analysis of measurements errors, is followed by a discussion of new findings obtained from measurements on both solid and nanopatterned membranes. The most important results have been a direct observation of non-diffusive phonon-mediated transport at room temperature and measurements of thickness-dependent thermal conductivity of suspended membranes across a wide thickness range, showing good agreement with first-principles-based theory assuming diffuse scattering at the boundaries. Measurements on a membrane with a periodic pattern of nanosized holes indicated fully diffusive transport and yielded thermal diffusivity values in agreement with Monte Carlo simulations. Based on the results obtained to-date, we conclude that room-temperature thermal transport in membranebased silicon nanostructures is now reasonably well understood.
  • Unique optical properties of colloidal semiconductor quantum dots (QDs), arising from quantum mechanical confinement of charge within these structures, present a versatile testbed for the study of how high electric fields affect the electronic structure of nanostructured solids. Earlier studies of quasi-DC electric field modulation of QD properties have been limited by the electrostatic breakdown processes under the high externally applied electric fields, which have restricted the range of modulation of QD properties. In contrast, in the present work we drive CdSe:CdS core:shell QD films with high-field THz-frequency electromagnetic pulses whose duration is only a few picoseconds. Surprisingly, in response to the THz excitation we observe QD luminescence even in the absence of an external charge source. Our experiments show that QD luminescence is associated with a remarkably high and rapid modulation of the QD band-gap, which is changing by more than 0.5 eV (corresponding to 25% of the unperturbed bandgap energy) within the picosecond timeframe of THz field profile. We show that these colossal energy shifts can be consistently explained by the quantum confined Stark effect. Our work demonstrates a route to extreme modulation of material properties without configurational changes in material sets or geometries. Additionally, we expect that this platform can be adapted to a novel compact THz detection scheme where conversion of THz fields (with meV-scale photon energies) to the visible/near-IR band (with eV-scale photon energies) can be achieved at room temperature with high bandwidth and sensitivity.
  • Nonlinear manipulation of nuclear and electron spins is the basis for all advanced methods in magnetic resonance including multidimensional nuclear magnetic and electron spin resonance spectroscopies, magnetic resonance imaging, and in recent years, quantum control over individual spins. The methodology is facilitated by the ease with which the regime of strong coupling can be reached between radiofrequency or microwave magnetic fields and nuclear or electron spins respectively, typified by sequences of magnetic pulses that control the magnetic moment directions. The capabilities meet a bottleneck, however, for far-infrared magnetic resonances characteristic of correlated electron materials, molecular magnets, and proteins that contain high-spin transition metal ions. Here we report the development of two-dimensional terahertz magnetic resonance spectroscopy and its use for direct observation of the nonlinear responses of collective spin waves (magnons). The spectra show magnon spin echoes and 2-quantum signals that reveal pairwise correlations between magnons at the Brillouin zone center. They also show resonance-enhanced second-harmonic and difference-frequency signals. Our methods are readily generalizable to multidimensional magnetic resonance spectroscopy and nonlinear coherent control of terahertz-frequency spin systems in molecular complexes, biomolecules, and materials.
  • Ultrafast two-dimensional spectroscopy utilizes correlated multiple light-matter interactions for retrieving dynamic features that may otherwise be hidden under the linear spectrum. Its extension to the terahertz regime of the electromagnetic spectrum, where a rich variety of material degrees of freedom reside, remains an experimental challenge. Here we report ultrafast two-dimensional terahertz spectroscopy of gas-phase molecular rotors at room temperature. Using time-delayed terahertz pulse pairs, we observe photon echoes and other nonlinear signals resulting from molecular dipole orientation induced by three terahertz field-dipole interactions. The nonlinear time-domain orientation signals are mapped into the frequency domain in two-dimensional rotational spectra which reveal J-state-resolved nonlinear rotational dynamics. The approach enables direct observation of correlated rotational transitions and may reveal rotational coupling and relaxation pathways in the ground electronic and vibrational state.
  • The phonon Boltzmann transport equation (BTE) is widely utilized to study non-diffusive thermal transport. We find a solution of the BTE in the thin film transient thermal grating (TTG) experimental geometry by using a recently developed variational approach with a trial solution supplied by the Fourier heat conduction equation. We obtain an analytical expression for the thermal decay rate that shows excellent agreement with Monte Carlo simulations. We also obtain a closed form expression for the effective thermal conductivity that demonstrates the full material property and heat transfer geometry dependence, and recovers the limits of the one-dimensional TTG expression for very thick films and the Fuchs-Sondheimer expression for very large grating spacings. The results demonstrate the utility of the variational technique for analyzing non-diffusive phonon-mediated heat transport for nanostructures in multi-dimensional transport geometries, and will assist the probing of the mean free path (MFP) distribution of materials via transient grating experiments.
  • We study the excitonic coupling and homogeneous spectral line width of brick layer J-aggregate films. We begin by analysing the structural information revealed by the two-exciton states probed in two-dimensional spectra. Our first main result is that the relation between the excitonic couplings and the spectral shift in a two-dimensional structure is different (larger shift for the same nearest neighbour coupling) from that in a one-dimensional structure, which leads to an estimation of dipolar coupling in two-dimensional lattices. We next investigate the mechanisms of homogeneous broadening - population relaxation and pure dephasing - and evaluate their relative importance in linear and two-dimensional aggregates. Our second main result is that pure dephasing dominates the line width in two-dimensional systems up to a crossover temperature, which explains the linear temperature dependence of the homogeneous line width. This is directly related to the decreased density of states at the band edge when compared with linear aggregates, thus reducing the contribution of population relaxation to dephasing. Pump-probe experiments are suggested to directly measure the lifetime of the bright state and can therefore support the proposed model.
  • We review the recent progress in experimental and theoretical research of interactions between the acoustic, magnetic and plasmonic transients in hybrid metal-ferromagnet multilayer structures excited by ultrashort laser pulses. The main focus is on understanding the nonlinear aspects of the acoustic dynamics in materials as well as the peculiarities in the nonlinear optical and magneto-optical response. For example, the nonlinear optical detection is illustrated in details by probing the static magneto-optical second harmonic generation in gold-cobalt-silver trilayer structures in Kretschmann geometry. Furthermore, we show experimentally how the nonlinear reshaping of giant ultrashort acoustic pulses propagating in gold can be quantified by time-resolved plasmonic interferometry and how these ultrashort optical pulses dynamically modulate the optical nonlinearities. The effective medium approximation for the optical properties of hybrid multilayers facilitates the understanding of novel optical detection techniques. In the discussion we highlight recent works on the nonlinear magneto-elastic interactions, and strain-induced effects in semiconductor quantum dots.
  • The impact of boundary scattering on non-diffusive thermal relaxation of a transient grating in thin membranes is rigorously analyzed using the multidimensional phonon Boltzmann equation. The gray Boltzmann simulation results indicate that approximating models derived from previously reported one-dimensional relaxation model and Fuchs-Sondheimer model fail to describe the thermal relaxation of membranes with thickness comparable with phonon mean free path. Effective thermal conductivities from spectral Boltzmann simulations completely free of any fitting parameters are shown to agree reasonably well with experimental results. These findings are important for improving our fundamental understanding of non-diffusive thermal transport in membranes and other nanostructures.
  • We report multistate optical switching among high-order bouncing-ball modes ("ripples") and whispering-gallerying modes ("petals") of exciton-polariton condensates in a laser-generated annular trap. By tailoring the diameter and power of the annular trap, the polariton condensate can be switched among different trapped modes, accompanied by redistribution of spatial densities and superlinear increase in the emission intensities, implying that polariton condensates in this geometry could be exploited for a multistate switch. A model based on non-Hermitian modes of the generalized Gross-Pitaevskii equation reveals that this mode switching arises from competition between pump-induced gain and in-plane polariton loss. The parameters for reproducible switching among trapped modes have been measured experimentally, giving us a phase diagram for mode switching. Taken together, the experimental result and theoretical modeling advances our fundamental understanding of the spontaneous emergence of coherence and move us toward its practical exploitation.
  • We present a novel method for THz generation in lithium niobate using a reflective stair-step echelon structure. The echelon produces a discretely tilted pulse front with less angular dispersion compared to a high groove-density grating. The THz output was characterized using both a 1-lens and 3-lens imaging system to set the tilt angle at room and cryogenic temperatures. Using broadband 800 nm pulses with a pulse energy of 0.95 mJ and a pulse duration of 70 fs (24 nm FWHM bandwidth, 39 fs transform limited width), we produced THz pulses with field strengths as high as 500 kV/cm and pulse energies as high as 3.1 $\mu$J. The highest conversion efficiency we obtained was 0.33%. In addition, we find that the echelon is easily implemented into an experimental setup for quick alignment and optimization.
  • A major challenge in condensed matter physics is active control of quantum phases. Dynamic control with pulsed electromagnetic fields can overcome energetic barriers enabling access to transient or metastable states that are not thermally accessible. Here we demonstrate strain-engineered tuning of La2/3Ca1/3MnO3 into an emergent charge-ordered insulating phase with extreme photo-susceptibility where even a single optical pulse can initiate a transition to a long-lived metastable hidden metallic phase. Comprehensive single-shot pulsed excitation measurements demonstrate that the transition is cooperative and ultrafast, requiring a critical absorbed photon density to activate local charge excitations that mediate magnetic-lattice coupling that, in turn, stabilize the metallic phase. These results reveal that strain engineering can tune emergent functionality towards proximal macroscopic states to enable dynamic ultrafast optical phase switching and control.
  • The phonon Boltzmann transport equation (BTE) is a powerful tool for studying non-diffusive thermal transport. Here, we develop a new universal variational approach to solving the BTE that enables extraction of phonon mean free path (MFP) distributions from experiments exploring non-diffusive transport. By utilizing the known Fourier solution as a trial function, we present a direct approach to calculating the effective thermal conductivity from the BTE. We demonstrate this technique on the transient thermal grating (TTG) experiment, which is a useful tool for studying non-diffusive thermal transport and probing the mean free path (MFP) distribution of materials. We obtain a closed form expression for a suppression function that is materials dependent, successfully addressing the non-universality of the suppression function used in the past, while providing a general approach to studying thermal properties in the non-diffusive regime.
  • Materials research with a focus on enhancing the minority-carrier lifetime of the light-absorbing semiconductor is key to advancing solar energy technology for both early-stage and mature material platforms alike. Tin sulfide (SnS) is an absorber material with several clear advantages for manufacturing and deployment, but the record power conversion efficiency remains below 5%. We report measurements of bulk and interface minority-carrier recombination rates in SnS thin films using optical-pump, terahertz (THz)-probe transient photoconductivity (TPC) measurements. Post-growth thermal annealing in H_2S gas increases the minority-carrier lifetime, and oxidation of the surface reduces the surface recombination velocity. However, the minority-carrier lifetime remains below 100 ps for all tested combinations of growth technique and post-growth processing. Significant improvement in SnS solar cell performance will hinge on finding and mitigating as-yet-unknown recombination-active defects. We describe in detail our methodology for TPC experiments, and we share our data analysis routines as freely-available software.