• The star S0-2, which orbits the supermassive black hole (SMBH) in our Galaxy with a period of 16 years, provides the strongest constraint on both the mass of the SMBH and the distance to the Galactic center. S0-2 will soon provide the first measurement of relativistic effects near a SMBH. We report the first limits on the binarity of S0-2 from radial velocity monitoring, which has implications for both understanding its origin and robustness as a probe of the central gravitational field. With 87 radial velocity measurements, which include 12 new observations presented, we have the data set to look for radial velocity variations from S0-2's orbital model. Using a Lomb-Scargle analysis and orbit fitting for potential binaries, we detect no radial velocity variation beyond S0-2's orbital motion and do not find any significant periodic signal. The lack of a binary companion does not currently distinguish between different formation scenarios for S0-2. The upper limit on the mass of a companion star ($M_{\text{comp}}$) still allowed by our results has a median upper limit of $M_{\text{comp}}$ $\sin i \leq$ 1.6 M$_{\odot}$ for periods between 1 and 150 days, the longest period to avoid tidal break up of the binary. We also investigate the impact of the remaining allowed binary system on the measurement of the relativistic redshift at S0-2's closest approach in 2018. While binary star systems are important to consider for this experiment, we find plausible binaries for S0-2 will not alter a 5$\sigma$ detection of the relativistic redshift.
  • We present new Adaptive Optics (AO) imaging and spectroscopic measurements of Galactic Center source G1 from W. M. Keck Observatory. Our goal is to understand its nature and relationship to G2, which is the first example of a spatially-resolved object interacting with the supermassive black hole (SMBH). Both objects have been monitored with AO for the past decade (2003 - 2014) and are comparatively close to the black hole ($a_{\rm{min}} \sim$200-300 AU) on very eccentric orbits ($e_{\rm{G1}}\sim$0.99; $e_{\rm{G2}}\sim$0.96). While G2 has been tracked before and during periapse passage ($T_{0} \sim$ 2014.2), G1 has been followed since soon after emerging from periapse ($T_{0} \sim$ 2001.3). Our observations of G1 double the previously reported observational time baseline, which improves its orbital parameter determinations. G1's orbital trajectory appears to be in the same plane as that of G2, but with a significantly different argument of periapse ($\Delta\omega$ = 21$\pm$4 degrees). This suggests that G1 is an independent object and not part of a gas stream containing G2 as has been proposed. Furthermore, we show for the first time that: (1) G1 is extended in the epochs closest to periapse along the direction of orbital motion and (2) G1 becomes significantly smaller over time, (450 AU in 2004 to less than 170 AU in 2009). Based on these observations, G1 appears to be the second example of an object tidally interacting with a SMBH. G1's existence 14 years after periapse, along with its compactness in epochs further from the time of periapse, suggest that this source is stellar in nature.
  • HD 141569 A is a pre-main sequence B9.5 Ve star surrounded by a prominent and complex circumstellar disk, likely still in a transition stage from protoplanetary to debris disk phase. Here, we present a new image of the third inner disk component of HD 141569 A made in the L' band (3.8 micron) during the commissioning of the vector vortex coronagraph recently installed in the near-infrared imager and spectrograph NIRC2 behind the W.M. Keck Observatory Keck II adaptive optics system. We used reference point spread function subtraction, which reveals the innermost disk component from the inner working distance of $\simeq 23$ AU and up to $\simeq 70$ AU. The spatial scale of our detection roughly corresponds to the optical and near-infrared scattered light, thermal Q, N and 8.6 micron PAH emission reported earlier. We also see an outward progression in dust location from the L'-band to the H-band (VLT/SPHERE image) to the visible (HST/STIS image), likely indicative of dust blowout. The warm disk component is nested deep inside the two outer belts imaged by HST NICMOS in 1999 (respectively at 406 and 245 AU). We fit our new L'-band image and spectral energy distribution of HD 141569 A with the radiative transfer code MCFOST. Our best-fit models favor pure olivine grains, and are consistent with the composition of the outer belts. While our image shows a putative very-faint point-like clump or source embedded in the inner disk, we did not detect any true companion within the gap between the inner disk and the first outer ring, at a sensitivity of a few Jupiter masses.
  • An optical vortex coronagraph has been implemented within the NIRC2 camera on the Keck II telescope and used to carry out on-sky tests and observations. The development of this new L'-band observational mode is described, and an initial demonstration of the new capability is presented: a resolved image of the low-mass companion to HIP79124, which had previously been detected by means of interferometry. With HIP79124 B at a projected separation of 186.5 mas, both the small inner working angle of the vortex coronagraph and the related imaging improvements were crucial in imaging this close companion directly. Due to higher Strehl ratios and more relaxed contrasts in L' band versus H band, this new coronagraphic capability will enable high-contrast small-angle observations of nearby young exoplanets and disks on a par with those of shorter-wavelength extreme adaptive optics coronagraphs.
  • For several years, we have been developing vortex phase masks based on sub-wavelength gratings, known as Annular Groove Phase Masks. Etched onto diamond substrates, these AGPMs are currently designed to be used in the thermal infrared (ranging from 3 to 13 {\mu}m). Our AGPMs were first installed on VLT/NACO and VLT/VISIR in 2012, followed by LBT/LMIRCam in 2013 and Keck/NIRC2 in 2015. In this paper, we review the development, commissioning, on-sky performance, and early scientific results of these new coronagraphic modes and report on the lessons learned. We conclude with perspectives for future developments and applications.
  • The detectability of planetesimal impacts on imaged exoplanets can be measured using Jupiter during the 1994 comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 events as a proxy. By integrating the whole planet flux with and without impact spots, the effect of the impacts at wavelengths from 2 - 4 microns is revealed. Jupiter's reflected light spectrum in the near-infrared is dominated by its methane opacity including a deep band at 2.3 microns. After the impact, sunlight that would have normally been absorbed by the large amount of methane in Jupiter's atmosphere was instead reflected by the cometary material from the impacts. As a result, at 2.3 microns, where the planet would normally have low reflectivity, it brightened substantially and stayed brighter for at least a month.
  • We report new observations of the Galactic Center source G2 from the W. M. Keck Observatory. G2 is a dusty red object associated with gas that shows tidal interactions as it nears closest approach with the Galaxy's central black hole. Our observations, conducted as G2 passed through periapse, were designed to test the proposal that G2 is a 3 earth mass gas cloud. Such a cloud should be tidally disrupted during periapse passage. The data were obtained using the Keck II laser guide star adaptive optics system (LGSAO) and the facility near-infrared camera (NIRC2) through the K' [2.1 $\mu$m] and L' [3.8 $\mu$m] broadband filters. Several results emerge from these observations: 1) G2 has survived its closest approach to the black hole as a compact, unresolved source at L'; 2) G2's L' brightness measurements are consistent with those over the last decade; 3) G2's motion continues to be consistent with a Keplerian model. These results rule out G2 as a pure gas cloud and imply that G2 has a central star. This star has a luminosity of $\sim$30 $L_{\odot} $ and is surrounded by a large ($\sim$2.6 AU) optically thick dust shell. The differences between the L' and Br-$\gamma$ observations can be understood with a model in which L' and Br-$\gamma$ emission arises primarily from internal and external heating, respectively. We suggest that G2 is a binary star merger product and will ultimately appear similar to the B-stars that are tightly clustered around the black hole (the so-called S-star cluster).
  • We study the Lya profiles of 36 spectroscopically-detected Lya-emitters (LAEs) at z2-3, using Keck MOSFIRE to measure systemic redshifts and velocity dispersions from rest-frame optical nebular emission lines. The sample has a median optical magnitude R=26.0, and ranges from R23 to R>27, corresponding to rest-frame UV absolute magnitudes M_UV-22 to M_UV>-18.2. Dynamical masses range from M_dyn<1.3e8 Msun to M_dyn=6.8e9 Msun, with a median value of M_dyn=6.3e8 Msun. Thirty of the 36 Lya emission lines are redshifted with respect to the systemic velocity with at least 1 sigma significance, and the velocity offset with respect to systemic dv_Lya is correlated with R-band magnitude, M_UV, and the velocity dispersion measured from nebular emission lines with >3 sigma significance: brighter galaxies with larger velocity dispersions tend to have larger values of dv_Lya. We also make use of a comparison sample of 122 UV-color-selected R<25.5 galaxies at z2, all with Lya emission and systemic redshifts measured from nebular emission lines. Using the combined LAE and comparison samples for a total of 158 individual galaxies, we find that dv_Lya is anti-correlated with the Lya equivalent width with 7 sigma significance. Our results are consistent with a scenario in which the Lya profile is determined primarily by the properties of the gas near the systemic redshift; in such a scenario, the opacity to Lya photons in lower mass galaxies may be reduced if large gaseous disks have not yet developed and if the gas is ionized by the harder spectrum of young, low metallicity stars.
  • We investigate the orbital motion of the Quintuplet cluster near the Galactic center with the aim of constraining formation scenarios of young, massive star clusters in nuclear environments. Three epochs of adaptive optics high-angular resolution imaging with Keck/NIRC2 and VLT/NACO were obtained over a time baseline of 5.8 years, delivering an astrometric accuracy of 0.5-1 mas/yr. Proper motions were derived in the cluster reference frame and were used to distinguish cluster members from the majority of field stars. Fitting the cluster and field proper motion distributions with 2D gaussian models, we derive the orbital motion of the cluster for the first time. The Quintuplet is moving with a 2D velocity of 132 +/- 15 km/s with respect to the field along the Galactic plane, which yields a 3D orbital velocity of 167 +/- 15 km/s when combined with the previously known radial velocity. From a sample of 119 stars measured in three epochs, we derive an upper limit to the velocity dispersion in the core of the Quintuplet cluster of sigma_1D < 10 km/s. Knowledge of the three velocity components of the Quintuplet allows us to model the cluster orbit in the potential of the inner Galaxy. Comparing the Quintuplet's orbit with the Arches orbit, we discuss the possibility that both clusters originated in the same area of the central molecular zone. [abridged]
  • We present new kinematic measurements and modeling of a sample of 116 young stars in the central parsec of the Galaxy in order to investigate the properties of the young stellar disk. The measurements were derived from a combination of speckle and laser guide star adaptive optics imaging and integral field spectroscopy from the Keck telescopes. Compared to earlier disk studies, the most important kinematic measurement improvement is in the precision of the accelerations in the plane of the sky, which have a factor of six smaller uncertainties (~10 uas/yr/yr). We have also added the first radial velocity measurements for 8 young stars, increasing the sample at the largest radii (6"-12") by 25%. We derive the ensemble properties of the observed stars using Monte-Carlo simulations of mock data. There is one highly significant kinematic feature (~20 sigma), corresponding to the well-known clockwise disk, and no significant feature is detected at the location of the previously claimed counterclockwise disk. The true disk fraction is estimated to be ~20%, a factor of ~2.5 lower than previous claims, suggesting that we may be observing the remnant of what used to be a more densely populated stellar disk. The similarity in the kinematic properties of the B stars and the O/WR stars suggests a common star formation event. The intrinsic eccentricity distribution of the disk stars is unimodal, with an average value of <e> = 0.27 +/- 0.07, which we show can be achieved through dynamical relaxation in an initially circular disk with a moderately top-heavy mass function.
  • We present Keck/MOSFIRE observations of the role of environment in the formation of galaxies at z~2. Using K-band spectroscopy of H-alpha and [N II] emission lines, we have analyzed the metallicities of galaxies within and around a z=2.3 protocluster discovered in the HS1700+643 field. Our main sample consists of 23 protocluster and 20 field galaxies with estimates of stellar masses and gas-phase metallicities based on the N2 strong-line metallicity indicator. With these data we have examined the mass-metallicity relation (MZR) with respect to environment at z~2. We find that field galaxies follow the well-established trend between stellar mass and metallicity, such that more massive galaxies have larger metallicities. The protocluster galaxies, however, do not exhibit a dependence of metallicity on mass, with the low-mass protocluster galaxies showing an enhancement in metallicity compared to field galaxies spanning the same mass range. A comparison with galaxy formation models suggests that the mass-dependent environmental trend we observed can be qualitatively explained in the context of the recycling of "momentum-driven" galaxy wind material. Accordingly, winds are recycled on a shorter timescale in denser environments, leading to an enhancement in metallicity at fixed mass for all but the most massive galaxies. Future hydrodynamical simulations of z~2 overdensities matching the one in the HS1700 field will be crucial for understanding the origin of the observed environmental trend in detail.
  • We present new high angular resolution near-infrared spectroscopic observations of the nuclear star cluster surrounding the Milky Way's central supermassive black hole. Using the integral-field spectrograph OSIRIS on Keck II behind the laser-guide-star adaptive optics system, this spectroscopic survey enables us to separate early-type (young, 4-6 Myr) and late-type (old, >1 Gyr) stars with a completeness of 50% down to K' = 15.5 mag, which corresponds to ~10 \msun for the early-type stars. This work increases the radial extent of reported OSIRIS/Keck measurements by more than a factor of 3 from 4" to 14" (0.16 pc to 0.56 pc), along the projected disk of young stars. For our analysis, we implement a new method of completeness correction using a combination of star-planting simulations and Bayesian inference. We assign probabilities for the spectral type of every source detected in deep imaging down to K' = 15.5 mag using information from spectra, simulations, number counts, and the distribution of stars. The inferred radial surface-density profiles, $\Sigma(R) \propto R^{-\Gamma}$, for the young stars and late-type giants are consistent with earlier results ($\Gamma_{early} = 0.93 \pm 0.09$, $\Gamma_{late} = 0.16 \pm 0.07$). The late-type surface-density profile is approximately flat out to the edge of the survey. While the late-type stellar luminosity function is consistent with the Galactic bulge, the completeness-corrected luminosity function of the early-type stars has significantly more young stars at faint magnitudes compared to previous surveys with similar depth. This luminosity function indicates that the corresponding mass function of the young stars is likely less top-heavy than that inferred from previous surveys.
  • The supermassive black hole at the center of the Milky Way plays host to a massive, young cluster that may have formed in one of the most inhospitable environments in the Galaxy. We present new measurements of the global properties of this cluster, including the initial mass function (IMF), age, and cluster mass. These results are based on Keck laser-guide-star adaptive optics observations used to identify the young stars and measure their Kp-band luminosity function as presented in Do et al. 2013. A Bayesian inference methodology is developed to simultaneously fit the global properties of the cluster utilizing the observations and extensive simulations of synthetic star clusters. We find that the slope of the mass function for this cluster is \alpha = 1.7 +/- 0.2, which is steeper than previously reported, but still flatter than the traditional Salpeter slope of 2.35. The age of the cluster is between 2.5-5.8 Myr with 95% confidence, which is a younger age than typically adopted but consistent within the uncertainties of past measurements. The exact age of the cluster is difficult to determine since our results show two distinct age solutions (3.9 Myr and 2.8 Myr) due to model degeneracies in the relative number of Wolf-Rayet and OB stars. The total cluster mass is between 14,000 - 37,000 \msun above 1 \msun and it is necessary to include multiple star systems in order to fit the observed luminosity function and the number of observed Wolf-Rayet stars. The new IMF slope measurement is now consistent with X-ray observations indicating a factor of 10 fewer X-ray emitting pre-main-sequence stars than expected when compared with a Salpeter IMF. The young cluster at the Galactic center is one of the few definitive examples of an IMF that deviates significantly from the near-universal IMFs found in the solar neighborhood.
  • In preparation for a study of their circumnuclear gas we have surveyed 60% of a complete sample of elliptical galaxies within 75 Mpc that are radiosources. Some 20% of our nuclear spectra have infrared emission lines, mostly Paschen lines, Brackett gamma and [FeII]. We consider the influence of radio power and black hole mass in relation to the spectra. Access to the spectra is provided as a community resource.
  • We present significantly improved proper motion measurements of the Milky Way's central stellar cluster. These improvements are made possible by refining our astrometric reference frame with a new geometric optical distortion model for the W. M. Keck II 10 m telescope's Adaptive Optics camera (NIRC2) in its narrow field mode. For the first time, this distortion model is constructed from on-sky measurements, and is made available to the public. When applied to widely dithered images, it produces residuals in the separations of stars that are a factor of ~3 smaller compared to the outcome using previous models. By applying this new model, along with corrections for differential atmospheric refraction, to widely dithered images of SiO masers at the Galactic center, we improve our ability to tie into the precisely measured radio Sgr A*-rest frame. The resulting infrared reference frame is ~2-3 times more accurate and stable than earlier published efforts. In this reference frame, Sgr A* is localized to within a position of 0.6 mas and a velocity of 0.09 mas/yr, or ~3.4 km/s at 8 kpc (1 sigma). While earlier proper motion studies defined a reference frame by assuming no net motion of the stellar cluster, this approach is fundamentally limited by the cluster's intrinsic dispersion and therefore will not improve with time. We define a reference frame with SiO masers and this reference frame's stability should improve steadily with future measurements of the SiO masers in this region. This is essential for achieving the necessary reference frame stability required to detect the effects of general relativity and extended mass on short-period stars at the Galactic center.
  • Deep Keck/NIRC2 HK'L' observations of the Arches cluster near the Galactic center reveal a significant population of near-infrared excess sources. We combine the L'-band excess observations with K'-band proper motions, to confirm cluster membership of excess sources in a starburst cluster for the first time. The robust removal of field contamination provides a reliable disk fraction down to our completeness limit of H=19 mag, or about 5 Msun at the distance of the Arches. Of the 24 identified sources with K'-L' > 2.0 mag, 21 have reliable proper motion measurements, all of which are proper motion members of the Arches cluster. VLT/SINFONI K'-band spectroscopy of three excess sources reveals strong CO bandhead emission, which we interpret as the signature of dense circumstellar disks. The detection of strong disk emission from the Arches stars is surprising in view of the high mass of the B-type main sequence host stars of the disks and the intense starburst environment. We find a disk fraction of 6 +/- 2% among B-type stars in the Arches cluster. A radial increase in the disk fraction from 3 to 10% suggests rapid disk destruction in the immediate vicinity of numerous O-type stars in the cluster core. A comparison between the Arches and other high- and low-mass star-forming regions provides strong indication that disk depletion is significantly more rapid in compact starburst clusters than in moderate star-forming environments.
  • We report a factor of $\sim$3 improvement in Keck Laser Guide Star Adaptive Optics (LGSAO) astrometric measurements of stars near the Galaxy's supermassive black hole (SMBH). By carrying out a systematic study of M92, we have produced a more accurate model for the camera's optical distortion. Updating our measurements with this model, and accounting for differential atmospheric refraction, we obtain estimates of the SMBH properties that are a factor of $\sim$2 more precise, and most notably, increase the likelihood that the black hole is at rest with respect to the nuclear star cluster. These improvements have also allowed us to extend the radius to which stellar orbital parameter estimates are possible by a factor of 2.
  • We present the results of near-infrared spectroscopic observations of dense ($\simgt$ 10$^3$ cm$^{-3}$) iron ejecta in the young core-collapse supernova remnant G11.2-0.3. Five ejecta knots projected to be close to its center show a large dispersion in their Doppler shifts: two knots in the east are blueshifted by more than 1,000 \kms, while three western knots have relatively small blueshifts of 20-60 \kms. This velocity discrepancy may indicate that the western knots have been significantly decelerated or that there exists a systematic velocity difference among the knots. One ejecta filament in the northwestern boundary, on the other hand, is redshifted by $\simgt$ 200 \kms, while opposite filament in the southeastern boundary shows a negligible radial motion. Some of the knots and filaments have secondary velocity components, and one knot shows a bow shock-like feature in the velocity structure. The iron ejecta appear to be devoid of strong emission from other heavy elements, such as S, which may attest to the alpha-rich freezeout process in the explosive nucleosynthesis of the core-collapse supernova explosion close to its center. The prominent bipolar distribution of the Fe ejecta in the northwestern and southeastern direction, along with the elongation of the central pulsar wind nebula in the perpendicular direction, is consistent with the interpretation that the supernova exploded primarily along the northwestern and southeastern direction.
  • We present the results of near-infrared [Fe II] and H2 line imaging and spectroscopic observations of the supernova remnant 3C 396 using the Palomar 5 m Hale telescope. We detect long, filamentary [Fe II] emission delineating the inner edge of the radio emission in the western boundary of the remnant in imaging observations, together with a bright [Fe II] emission clump close to the remnant center. There appears to be faint, diffuse [Fe II] emission between the central clump and the western filamentary emission. The spectroscopic observations determine the expansion velocity of the central clump to be ~56 km/s. This is far smaller than the expansion velocity of 3C 396 obtained from X-ray observations, implying the inhomogeneity of the ambient medium. The electron number density of the [Fe II] emission gas is < 2,000 cm-3. The H2 line emission, on the other hand, lies slightly outside the filamentary [Fe II] emission in the western boundary, and forms a rather straight filament. We suggest that the [Fe II] emission represents dense clumps in the wind material from the red supergiant phase of a Type IIL/b progenitor of 3C 396 which have been swept up by the supernova remnant shocks. The H2 emission may represent either the boundary of a wind bubble produced during the main-sequence phase of the progenitor or molecular clumps left over inside the bubble. We propose that the near-infrared [Fe II] and H2 emission observed in several supernova remnants of Type IIL/b SNe likely has the same origin.
  • We present the first measurement of the proper motion of the young, compact Arches cluster near the Galactic center from near-infrared adaptive optics (AO) data taken with the recently commissioned laser-guide star (LGS) at the Keck 10-m telescope. The excellent astrometric accuracy achieved with LGS-AO provides the basis for a detailed comparison with VLT/NAOS-CONICA data taken 4.3 years earlier. Over the 4.3 year baseline, a spatial displacement of the Arches cluster with respect to the field population is measured to be 24.0 +/- 2.2 mas, corresponding to a proper motion of 5.6 +/- 0.5 mas/yr or 212 +/- 29 km/s at a distance of 8 kpc. In combination with the known line-of-sight velocity of the cluster, we derive a 3D space motion of 232 +/- 30 km/s of the Arches relative to the field. The large proper motion of the Arches cannot be explained with any of the closed orbital families observed in gas clouds in the bar potential of the inner Galaxy, but would be consistent with the Arches being on a transitional trajectory from x1 to x2 orbits. We investigate a cloud-cloud collision as the possible origin for the Arches cluster. The integration of the cluster orbit in the potential of the inner Galaxy suggests that the cluster passes within 10 pc of the supermassive black hole only if its true GC distance is very close to its projected distance. A contribution of young stars from the Arches cluster to the young stellar population in the inner few parsecs of the GC thus appears increasingly unlikely. The measurement of the 3D velocity and orbital analysis provides the first observational evidence that Arches-like clusters do not spiral into the GC. This confirms that no progenitor clusters to the nuclear cluster are observed at the present epoch.
  • We present the results of near-infrared imaging and spectroscopic observations of the young, core-collapse supernova remnant (SNR) G11.2-0.3. In the [Fe II] 1.644 um image, we first discover long, clumpy [Fe II] filaments within the radio shell of the SNR, together with some faint, knotty features in the interior of the remnant. We have detected several [Fe II] lines and HI Br-G line toward the peak position of the bright southeastern [Fe II] filament. The derived extinction is large (Av=13 mag) and it is the brightest [Fe II] filament detected toward SNRs to date. By analyzing two [Fe II] 1.644 um images obtained in 2.2 yrs apart, we detect a proper motion corresponding to an expansion rate of 0.''035 (0.''013) /yr [or 830 (310) km/s]. We also discover two small H2 filaments. One is bright and along the SE boundary of the radio shell, while the other is faint and just outside of its NE boundary. We have detected H2 (2-1) S(3) line toward the former filament and derive an excitation temperature of 2,100 K. We suggest that the H2 filaments are dense clumps in a presupernova circumstellar wind swept up by the SNR shock while the [Fe II] filaments are probably composed of both shocked wind material and shocked supernova (SN) ejecta. The distribution of [Fe II] filaments may indicate that the SN explosion in G11.2-0.3 was asymmetric as in Cassiopeia A. Our results support the suggestion that G11.2-0.3 is a remnant of a SN IIL/b interacting with a dense red supergiant wind.
  • We present observations made with the newly commissioned Keck laser-guide star adaptive optics system of 6 objects in M31 that are alleged in multiple recent studies to be young globular clusters (GCs); all are supposed to have ages less than 5 Gyr. The resulting FWHM of the PSF core in our images is ~70 mas. The four youngest of these objects are asterisms; they are with certainty not young GCs in M31. Based on their morphology, the two oldest are GCs in M31. While the M31 GCs with ages 5 -- 8 Gyr appear to be mostly genuine, it appears that many of the alleged very young GCs in M31 are spurious identifications. This problem will be even more severe in studies of the GC systems of more distant spiral galaxies now underway, for which imaging at the spatial resolution of our observations in M31 may not be adequate to detect sample contamination by asterisms.
  • We present evidence that ~ 30 minute episodes of jet formation in GRS 1915+105 may sometimes be a superposition of smaller, faster phenomena. Based on observations in 2002 July using the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer and the Palomar 5 meter telescope, we show that GRS 1915+105 sometimes produces ~ 30 minute infrared flares that can entirely be explained as a combination of small (~ 150 second) flares, one for each oscillation in the accompanying X-ray light curve. We discuss the differences between these observations and similar ones in 1997 August and conclude that an X-ray "trigger spike" seen during each cycle in 1997 is a key ingredient for large ejections to occur on ~ 30 minute timescales in this source.
  • We present evidence that ~ 30 minute episodes of jet formation in the Galactic microquasar GRS 1915+105 may sometimes entirely be a superposition of smaller, faster phenomena. We base this conclusion on simultaneous X-ray and infrared observations in July 2002, using the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer and the Palomar 5 meter telescope. On two nights, we observed quasi-periodic infrared flares from GRS 1915+105, each accompanied by a set of fast oscillations in the X-ray light curve (indicating an interaction between the jet and accretion disk). In contrast to similar observations in 1997, we find that the duration of each X-ray cycle matches the duration of its accompanying infrared flare, and we observed one instance in which an isolated X-ray oscillation occurred at the same time as a faint infrared "subflare" (of duration ~ 150 seconds) superimposed on one of the main flares. From these data, we are able to conclude that each X-ray oscillation had an associated faint infrared flare and that these flares blend together to form, and entirely comprise, the ~ 30 minute events we observed. Part of the infrared emission in 1997 also appears to be due to superimposed small flares, but it was overshadowed by infrared-bright ejections associated with the appearance of a sharp "trigger" spike in each X-ray cycle that were not present in 2002. We also study the evolution of the X-ray spectrum and find significant differences in the high energy power law component, which was strongly variable in 1997 but not in 2002. Taken together, these observations reveal the diversity of ways in which the accretion disk and jet in black hole systems are capable of interacting and solidify the importance of the trigger spike for large ejections to occur on ~ 30 minute timescales in GRS 1915+105.
  • We present near-infrared spectra for a sample of T dwarfs, including eleven new discoveries made using the Two Micron All Sky Survey. These objects are distinguished from warmer (L-type) brown dwarfs by the presence of methane absorption bands in the 1--2.5 $\micron$ spectral region. A first attempt at a near-infrared classification scheme for T dwarfs is made, based on the strengths of CH$_4$ and H$_2$O bands and the shapes of the 1.25, 1.6, and 2.1 $\micron$ flux peaks. Subtypes T1 V through T8 V are defined, and spectral indices useful for classification are presented. The subclasses appear to follow a decreasing T$_{eff}$ scale, based on the evolution of CH$_4$ and H$_2$O bands and the properties of L and T dwarfs with known distances. However, we speculate that this scale is not linear with spectral type for cool dwarfs, due to the settling of dust layers below the photosphere and subsequent rapid evolution of spectral morphology around T$_{eff}$ $\sim$ 1300--1500 K. Similarities in near-infrared colors and continuity of spectral features suggest that the gap between the latest L dwarfs and earliest T dwarfs has been nearly bridged. This argument is strengthened by the possible role of CH$_4$ as a minor absorber shaping the K-band spectra of the latest L dwarfs. Finally, we discuss one peculiar T dwarf, 2MASS 0937+2931, which has very blue near-infrared colors (J-K$_s$ = $-0.89\pm$0.24) due to suppression of the 2.1 $\micron$ peak. The feature is likely caused by enhanced collision-induced H$_2$ absorption in a high pressure or low metallicity photosphere.