• In this paper, we revisit the estimation of the spectrum of primordial gravitational waves originated from inflation, particularly focusing on the effect of thermodynamics in the Standard Model of particle physics. By collecting recent results of perturbative and non-perturbative analysis of thermodynamic quantities in the Standard Model, we obtain the effective degrees of freedom including the corrections due to non-trivial interaction properties of particles in the Standard Model for a wide temperature interval. The impact of such corrections on the spectrum of primordial gravitational waves as well as the damping effect due to free-streaming particles is investigated by numerically solving the evolution equation of tensor perturbations in the expanding universe. It is shown that the reevaluation of the effects of free-streaming photons and neutrinos gives rise to some additional damping features overlooked in previous studies. We also observe that the continuous nature of the QCD crossover results in a smooth spectrum for modes that reenter the horizon at around the epoch of the QCD phase transition. Furthermore, we explicitly show that the values of the effective degrees of freedom remain smaller than the commonly used value 106.75 even at temperature much higher than the critical temperature of the electroweak crossover, and that the amplitude of primordial gravitational waves at a frequency range relevant to direct detection experiments becomes $\mathcal{O}(1)\,\%$ larger than previous estimates that do not include such corrections. This effect can be relevant to future high-sensitivity gravitational wave experiments such as ultimate DECIGO. Our results on the temperature evolution of the effective degrees of freedom are made available as tabulated data and fitting functions, which can also be used in the analysis of other cosmological relics.
  • The axion arises in well-motivated extensions of the Standard Model of particle physics and is regarded as an alternative to the weakly interacting massive particle paradigm to explain the nature of dark matter. In this contribution, we review theoretical aspects of dark matter axions, particularly focusing on recent developments in the estimation of their relic abundance. A closer look at their non-thermal production mechanisms in the early universe reveals the possibility of explaining the observed dark matter abundance in various mass ranges. The mass ranges predicted in various cosmological scenarios are briefly summarized.
  • We investigate inflation models in Jordan frame supergravity, in which an inflaton non-minimally couples to the scalar curvature. By imposing the condition that an inflaton would have the canonical kinetic term in the Jordan frame, we construct inflation models with asymptotically flat potential through pole inflation technique and discuss their relation to the models based on Einstein frame supergravity. We also show that the model proposed by Ferrara et al. has special position and the relation between the K\"ahler potential and the frame function is uniquely determined by requiring that scalars take the canonical kinetic terms in the Jordan frame and that a frame function consists only of a holomorphic term (and its anti-holomorphic counterpart) for symmetry breaking terms. Our case corresponds to relaxing the latter condition.
  • There are a number of observational hints from astrophysics which point to the existence of stellar energy losses beyond the ones accounted for by neutrino emission. These excessive energy losses may be explained by the existence of a new sub-keV mass pseudoscalar Nambu--Goldstone boson with tiny couplings to photons, electrons, and nucleons. An attractive possibility is to identify this particle with the axion -- the hypothetical pseudo Nambu--Goldstone boson predicted by the Peccei--Quinn solution to the strong CP problem. We explore this possibility in terms of a DFSZ-type axion and of a KSVZ-type axion/majoron, respectively. Both models allow a good global fit to the data, prefering an axion mass around 10 meV. We show that future axion experiments -- the fifth force experiment ARIADNE and the helioscope IAXO -- can attack the preferred mass range from the lower and higher end, respectively. An axion in this mass range can also be the main constituent of dark matter.
  • In this contribution, we discuss the cosmological scenario where unstable domain walls are formed in the early universe and their late-time annihilation produces a significant amount of gravitational waves. After describing cosmological constraints on long-lived domain walls, we estimate the typical amplitude and frequency of gravitational waves observed today. We also review possible extensions of the standard model of particle physics that predict the formation of unstable domain walls and can be probed by observation of relic gravitational waves. It is shown that recent results of pulser timing arrays and direct detection experiments partially exclude the relevant parameter space, and that a much wider parameter space can be covered by the next generation of gravitational wave observatories.
  • The Peccei-Quinn mechanism presents a neat solution to the strong CP problem. As a by-product, it provides an ideal dark matter candidate, "the axion", albeit with a tiny mass. Axions therefore can act as dark radiation if excited with large momenta after the end of inflation. Nevertheless, the recent measurement of relativistic degrees of freedom from cosmic microwave background radiation strictly constrains the abundance of such extra relativistic species. We show that ultra-relativistic axions can be abundantly produced if the Peccei-Quinn field was initially displaced from the minimum of the potential. This in lieu places an interesting constraint on the axion dark matter window with large decay constant which is expected to be probed by future experiments. Moreover, an upper bound on the reheating temperature can be placed, which further constrains the thermal history of our Universe.
  • Minimal chaotic models of D-term inflation predicts too large primordial tensor perturbations. Although it can be made consistent with observations utilizing higher order terms in the K\"ahler potential, expansion is not controlled in the absence of symmetries. We comprehensively study the conditions of K\"ahler potential for D-term plateau-type potentials and discuss its symmetry. They include the alpha-attractor model with a massive vector supermultiplet and its generalization leading to pole inflation of arbitrary order. We extend the models so that it can describe Coulomb phase, gauge anomaly is cancelled, and fields other than inflaton are stabilized during inflation. We also point out a generic issue for large-field D-term inflation that the masses of the non-inflaton fields tend to exceed the Planck scale.
  • We consider extensions of the Standard Model in which a spontaneously broken global chiral Peccei-Quinn (PQ) symmetry arises as an accidental symmetry of an exact $Z_N$ symmetry. For $N = 9$ or $10$, this symmetry can protect the accion - the Nambu-Goldstone boson arising from the spontaneous breaking of the accidental PQ symmetry - against semi-classical gravity effects, thus suppressing gravitational corrections to the effective potential, while it can at the same time provide for the small explicit symmetry breaking term needed to make models with domain wall number $N_{\rm DW}>1$, such as the popular Dine-Fischler-Srednicki-Zhitnitsky (DFSZ) model ($N_{\rm DW}=6$), cosmologically viable even in the case where spontaneous PQ symmetry breaking occurred after inflation. We find that $N=10$ DFSZ accions with mass $m_A \approx 3.5$-$4.2\,\mathrm{meV}$ can account for cold dark matter and simultaneously explain the hints for anomalous cooling of white dwarfs. The proposed helioscope International Axion Observatory - being sensitive to solar DFSZ accions with mass above a few meV - will decisively test this scenario.
  • We discuss a possibility that the domain wall problem in the next-to-minimal supersymmetric standard model is alleviated without introducing a small explicit $Z_3$ breaking term by analyzing the evolution of the singlet scalar field within an inflationary paradigm. The singlet scalar field which explains the $\mu$-term tracks a time-varying minimum of the effective potential after inflation and slowly rolls down to its global minimum if there exist sufficiently large negative Hubble-induced corrections on the effective potential for the singlet field, which arise through supergravity. As a consequence, the whole Universe is confined within a single domain during and after inflation, which prevents the formation of domain walls. This will further constrain the history of the early Universe along with the Higgs-singlet coupling.
  • The next-to-minimal supersymmetric standard model predicts the formation of domain walls due to the spontaneous breaking of the discrete $Z_3$-symmetry at the electroweak phase transition, and they collapse before the epoch of big bang nucleosynthesis if there exists a small bias term in the potential which explicitly breaks the discrete symmetry. Signatures of gravitational waves produced from these unstable domain walls are estimated and their parameter dependence is investigated. It is shown that the amplitude of gravitational waves becomes generically large in the decoupling limit, and that their frequency is low enough to be probed in future pulsar timing observations.
  • The cosmological scenario where the Peccei-Quinn symmetry is broken after inflation is investigated. In this scenario, topological defects such as strings and domain walls produce a large number of axions, which contribute to the cold dark matter of the universe. The previous estimations of the cold dark matter abundance are updated and refined based on the field-theoretic simulations with improved grid sizes. The possible uncertainties originated in the numerical calculations are also discussed. It is found that axions can be responsible for the cold dark matter in the mass range $m_a=(0.8-1.3)\times 10^{-4}\mathrm{eV}$ for the models with the domain wall number $N_{\rm DW}=1$, and $m_a\approx\mathcal{O}(10^{-4}-10^{-2})\mathrm{eV}$ with a mild tuning of parameters for the models with $N_{\rm DW}>1$. Such higher mass ranges can be probed in future experimental studies.
  • We investigate whether the baryon asymmetry of the universe is explained in the framework of the supersymmetric extension of the Standard Model with R-parity violating interactions. It is shown that the Affleck-Dine mechanism naturally works via a trilinear interaction $LLE^c$, $LQD^c$, or $U^cD^cD^c$, if the magnitude of the coupling corresponding to the operator $\lambda$, $\lambda'$, or $\lambda''$ is sufficiently small. The formation of Q-balls and their subsequent evolution are also discussed. The present baryon asymmetry can be explained in the parameter region where R-parity is mildly violated $10^{-9}\lesssim\lambda,\lambda',\lambda''\lesssim 10^{-6}$ and the mass of the gravitino is relatively heavy $m_{3/2}\gtrsim 10^4\mathrm{GeV}$. On the other hand, it is difficult to explain the present baryon asymmetry for larger values of R-parity violating couplings $\lambda,\lambda',\lambda''\gtrsim 10^{-5}$, since Q-balls are likely to be destructed in the thermal environment and the primordial baryon number is washed away.
  • We investigate the structure of gravitational self-interactions of coherently oscillating axions in the general relativistic framework. A generic action for a massive scalar field in the Friedmann-Robertson-Walker background is first introduced based on the effective field theory approach to cosmological perturbations. Using the obtained setup, we evaluate the effective gravitational interaction of the massive scalar field, i.e. scalar quartic interactions mediated by metric perturbations. Applying the results to the system of dark matter axions, we estimate their self-interaction rate and discuss its implications for the axion Bose-Einstein condensate dark matter scenario. Leading contributions for the gravitational interactions of axions are given by the process mediated by the dynamical graviton field, which is essentially the Newtonian potential induced by fluctuations of the background fluids. We find that it leads to the same order of magnitude for the interaction rate of dark matter axions in the condensed regime, compared with the results of previous studies using the Newtonian approximation.
  • We revisit the production of gravitational waves from unstable domain walls analyzing their spectrum by the use of field theoretic lattice simulations with grid size $1024^3$, which is larger than the previous study. We have recognized that there exists an error in the code used in the previous study, and the correction of the error leads to the suppression of the spectrum of gravitational waves at high frequencies. The peak of the spectrum is located at the scale corresponding to the Hubble radius at the time of the decay of domain walls, and its amplitude is consistent with the naive estimation based on the quadrupole formula. Using the numerical results, the magnitude and the peak frequency of gravitational waves at the present time are estimated. It is shown that for some choices of parameters the signal of gravitational waves is strong enough to be probed in the future gravitational wave experiments.
  • We calculate the production of the gravitational waves from a double inflation model with lattice simulations. Between the two inflationary stages, gravitational waves with a characteristic frequency are produced by fluctuations of the scalar fields enhanced through parametric resonance. The wavelength of the produced gravitational waves gets extra redshift during the second inflationary stage and it can be in the observable range for the direct gravitational wave detectors. It is found that there is a possibility for the produced gravitational waves to be detected in the planned experiments.
  • We discuss the possibility that dark matter axions form a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) due to the gravitational self-interactions. The formation of BEC occurs in the condensed regime, where the transition rate between different momentum states is large compared to the energy exchanged in the transition. The time evolution of the quantum state occupation number of axions in the condensed regime is derived based on the in-in formalism. We recover the expression for the thermalization rate due to self interaction of the axion field, which was obtained in the other literature. It is also found that the leading order contributions for interactions between axions and other species vanish, which implies that the axion BEC does not give any significant modifications on standard cosmological parameters.
  • We investigate the cosmological constraints on axion models where the domain wall number is greater than one. In these models, multiple domain walls attached to strings are formed, and they survive for a long time. Their annihilation occurs due to the effects of explicit symmetry breaking term which might be raised by Planck-scale physics. We perform three-dimensional lattice simulations and compute the spectra of axions and gravitational waves produced by long-lived domain walls. Using the numerical results, we estimated relic density of axions and gravitational waves. We find that the existence of long-lived domain walls leads to the overproduction of cold dark matter axions, while the density of gravitational waves is too small to observe at the present time. Combining the results with other observational constraints, we find that the whole parameter region of models are excluded unless an unacceptable fine-tuning exists.
  • We analyze the spectrum of axions radiated from collapse of domain walls, which have received less attention in the literature. The evolution of topological defects related to the axion models is investigated by performing field-theoretic lattice simulations. We simulate the whole process of evolution of the defects, including the formation of global strings, the formation of domain walls and the annihilation of the defects due to the tension of walls. The spectrum of radiated axions has a peak at the low frequency, which implies that axions produced by the collapse of domain walls are not highly relativistic. We revisit the relic abundance of cold dark matter axions and find that the contribution from the decay of defects can be comparable with the contribution from strings. This result leads to a more severe upper bound on the axion decay constant.
  • In this paper, following the previous study, we evaluate the spectrum of gravitational wave background generated by domain walls which are produced if some discrete symmetry is spontaneously broken in the early universe. We apply two different methods to calculate the gravitational wave spectrum: One is to calculate the gravitational wave spectrum directly from numerical simulations, and another is to calculate it indirectly by estimating the unequal time anisotropic stress power spectrum of the scalar field. Both analysises indicate that the slope of the spectrum changes at two characteristic frequencies corresponding to the Hubble radius at the decay of domain walls and the width of domain walls, and that the spectrum between these two characteristic frequencies becomes flat or slightly red tilted. The second method enables us to evaluate the GW spectrum semi-analytically for the frequencies which can not be resolved in the finite box lattice simulations, but relies on the assumptions for the unequal time correlations of the source.
  • We study the cosmological evolution of domain walls bounded by strings which arise naturally in axion models. If we introduce a bias in the potential, walls become metastable and finally disappear. We perform two dimensional lattice simulations of domain wall networks and estimate the decay rate of domain walls. By using the numerical results, we give a constraint for the bias parameter and the Peccei-Quinn scale. We also discuss the possibility to probe axion models by direct detection of gravitational waves produced by domain walls.
  • We study the production of gravitational waves from cosmic domain walls created during phase transition in the early universe. We investigate the process of formation and evolution of domain walls by running three dimensional lattice simulations. If we introduce an approximate discrete symmetry, walls become metastable and finally disappear. We calculate the spectrum of gravitational waves produced by collapsing metastable domain walls. Extrapolating the numerical results, we find the signal of gravitational waves produced by domain walls whose energy scale is around 10^10-10^12GeV will be observable in the next generation gravitational wave interferometers.