• The infall regions of galaxy clusters represent the largest gravitationally bound structures in a $\Lambda$CDM universe. Measuring cluster mass profiles into the infall regions provides an estimate of the ultimate mass of these haloes. We use the caustic technique to measure cluster mass profiles from galaxy redshifts obtained with the Hectospec Cluster Survey (HeCS), an extensive spectroscopic survey of galaxy clusters with MMT/Hectospec. We survey 58 clusters selected by X-ray flux at 0.1$<$$z$$<$0.3. The survey includes 21,314 unique MMT/Hectospec redshifts for individual galaxies; 10,275 of these galaxies are cluster members. For each cluster we acquired high signal-to-noise spectra for $\sim 200$ cluster members and a comparable number of foreground/background galaxies. The cluster members trace out infall patterns around the clusters. The members define a very narrow red sequence. The velocity dispersions decline with radius; we demonstrate that the determination of the velocity dispersion is insensitive to the inclusion of bluer members (a small fraction of the cluster population). We apply the caustic technique to define membership and estimate the mass profiles to large radii. The ultimate halo mass of clusters (the mass that remains bound in the far future of a $\Lambda$CDM universe) is on average (1.99$\pm$0.11)$M_{200}$, a new observational cosmological test in essential agreement with simulations. Summed profiles binned in $M_{200}$ and in $L_X$ demonstrate that the predicted NFW form of the density profile is a remarkably good representation of the data in agreement with weak lensing results extending to large radius. The concentration of these summed profiles is also consistent with theoretical predictions.
  • We present Spitzer MIPS 24-micron observations of 16 0.4<z<0.8 galaxy clusters drawn from the ESO Distant Cluster Survey (EDisCS). This is the first large 24-micron survey of clusters at intermediate redshift. The depth of our imaging corresponds to a total IR luminosity of 8x10^10 Lsun, just below the luminosity of luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs), and 6^{+1}_{-1}% of M_V < -19 cluster members show 24-micron emission at or above this level. We compare with a large sample of coeval field galaxies and find that while the fraction of cluster LIRGs lies significantly below that of the field, the IR luminosities of the field and cluster galaxies are consistent. However, the stellar masses of the EDisCS LIRGs are systematically higher than those of the field LIRGs. A comparison with optical data reveals that ~80% of cluster LIRGs are blue and the remaining 20% lie on the red sequence. Of LIRGs with optical spectra, 88^{+4}_{-5}% show [O II] emission with EW([O II])>5A, and ~75% exhibit optical signatures of dusty starbursts. On average, the fraction of cluster LIRGs increases with projected cluster-centric radius but remains systematically lower than the field fraction over the area probed (< 1.5xR200). The amount of obscured star formation declines significantly over the 2.4 Gyr interval spanned by the EDisCS sample, and the rate of decline is the same for the cluster and field populations. Our results are consistent with an exponentially declining LIRG fraction, with the decline in the field delayed by ~1 Gyr relative to the clusters.
  • We present the first comparison of virial masses of galaxy clusters with their Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect (SZE) signals. We study 15 clusters from the Hectospec Cluster Survey (HeCS) with MMT/Hectospec spectroscopy and published SZE signals. We measure virial masses of these clusters from an average of 90 member redshifts inside the radius $r_{100}$. The virial masses of the clusters are strongly correlated with their SZE signals (at the 99% confidence level using a Spearman rank-sum test). This correlation suggests that $Y_{SZ}$ can be used as a measure of virial mass. Simulations predict a powerlaw scaling of $Y_{SZ}\propto M_{200}^\alpha$ with $\alpha\approx$1.6. Observationally, we find $\alpha$=1.11$\pm$0.16, significantly shallower (given the formal uncertainty) than the theoretical prediction. However, the selection function of our sample is unknown and a bias against less massive clusters cannot be excluded (such a selection bias could artificially flatten the slope). Moreover, our sample indicates that the relation between velocity dispersion (or virial mass estimate) and SZE signal has significant intrinsic scatter, comparable to the range of our current sample. More detailed studies of scaling relations are therefore needed to derive a robust determination of the relation between cluster mass and SZE.
  • We use the Fifth Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey to study X-ray-selected galaxy groups and compare their properties to clusters. We search for infall patterns around the groups and use these to measure group mass profiles to large radii. In previous work, we analyzed infall patterns for an X-ray-selected sample of 72 clusters from the ROSAT All-Sky Survey. Here, we extend this approach to a sample of systems with smaller X-ray fluxes selected from the 400 Square Degree serendipitous survey of clusters and groups in ROSAT pointed observations. We identify 16 groups with SDSS DR5 spectroscopy, search for infall patterns, and compute mass profiles out to 2-6 Mpc from the group centers with the caustic technique. No other mass estimation methods are currently available at such large radii for these low-mass groups, because the virial estimate requires dynamical equilibrium and the gravitational lensing signal is too weak. Despite the small masses of these groups, most display recognizable infall patterns. We use caustic and virial mass estimates to measure the scaling relations between different observables, extending these relations to smaller fluxes and luminosities than many previous surveys. Close inspection reveals that three of the groups are subclusters in the outskirts of larger clusters. A fourth group is apparently undergoing a group-group merger. These four merging groups represent the most extreme outliers in the scaling relations. Excluding these groups, we find $L_X\propto\sigma_p^{3.4\pm1.6}$, consistent with previous determinations for both clusters and groups. Understanding cluster and group scaling relations is crucial for measuring cosmological parameters from clusters.
  • The recently revised cosmological constraints from the Five-Year WMAP data ameliorate previous tension between cosmological constraints from the microwave background and from cluster abundances. We demonstrate that the revised estimates of cosmological parameters are in excellent agreement with the mass function of X-ray clusters in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Velocity segregation between galaxies and the underlying dark matter could cause virial mass estimates to be biased, causing the mass scale of the mass function to be offset from the true value. Modest velocity segregation ($\sigma_{gxy}/\sigma_{DM}$=1.13$^{+0.06}_{-0.05}$) is sufficient to match the mass function to the Five-Year WMAP results. When the new WMAP results are combined with constraints from supernovae and baryon acoustic oscillations, there is no need for velocity segregation ($\sigma_{gxy}/\sigma_{DM}$=1.05$\pm$0.05). This result agrees with expectations for velocity segregation from state-of-the-art numerical simulations of clusters. Together with the improved agreement between the new WMAP results and recent cosmic shear measurements, this result demonstrates that the amplitude of large-scale structure in the nearby universe matches that predicted from the structure seen in the microwave background. The new constraint we place on velocity segregation in clusters indicates that virial mass estimates for clusters are reasonably accurate. This result suggests that future cluster surveys will be able to probe both cosmological parameters and fundamental cluster physics.
  • We report a new determination of the faint end of the galaxy luminosity function in the nearby clusters Virgo and Abell 2199 using data from SDSS and the Hectospec multifiber spectrograph on the MMT. The luminosity function of A2199 is consistent with a single Schechter function to M_r=-15.6 + 5 log h_70 with a faint-end slope of alpha=-1.13+/-0.07. The LF in Virgo extends to M_r=-13.5= M^*+8 and has a slope of alpha=-1.28+/-0.06. The red sequence of cluster members is prominent in both clusters, and almost no cluster galaxies are redder than this sequence. We show that selecting objects on the red sequence and blueward produces a steeply rising faint-end. A large fraction of photometric red-sequence galaxies lie behind the cluster. We compare our results to previous estimates and find poor agreement with estimates based on statistical background subtraction but good agreement with estimates based on photometric membership classifications (e.g., colors, morphology, surface brightness). We conclude that spectroscopic data are critical for estimating the faint end of the luminosity function in clusters. The faint-end slope we find is consistent with values found for field galaxies, weakening any argument for environmental evolution in the relative abundance of dwarf galaxies. However, dwarf galaxies in clusters are significantly redder than field galaxies of similar luminosity or mass, indicating that star formation processes in dwarfs do depend on environment.
  • We have identified perhaps the largest major galaxy merger ever seen. While analysing Spitzer IRAC images of CL0958+4702, an X-ray selected cluster at z=0.39, we discovered an unusual plume of stars extending $\gtrsim$110 kpc outward from the bright central galaxy (BCG). Three galaxies 1-1.5 mag fainter than the BCG lie within 17 kpc (projected) of the BCG and are probably participating in the merger. The plume is detected in all four IRAC channels and at optical wavelengths in images from the WIYN telescope; the surface brightness is remarkably high ($\mu_r\approx$24.8 mag arcsec$^{-2}$ at 50 kpc). The optical and infrared colors are consistent with those of other BCGs, suggesting that the plume is composed of old stars and negligible recent star formation (hence a "dry merger"). The luminosity in the plume is at least equivalent to a 4L^* galaxy. A diffuse halo extending 110 kpc from the BCG in one IRAC image suggests the total amount of diffuse light is L_r\sim 1.3x10^{11}h^{-2} L_sun. A Chandra observation shows an X-ray image and spectrum typical of moderate-mass clusters. We use MMT/Hectospec to measure 905 redshifts in a 1 deg^2 region around the cluster. The velocities of two of the BCG companions indicate a merger timescale for the companion galaxies of $\sim$110 Myr and $\sim$0.5-1 Gyr for the plume. We conclude that the BCG and intracluster light of CL0958 is formed by major mergers at moderate redshifts. After the major merger is complete, CL0958 will likely become a fossil cluster.
  • We present a new determination of the cluster mass function and velocity dispersion function in a volume $\sim10^7 h^3$Mpc$^{-3}$ using the Fourth Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). We use the caustic technique to remove foreground and background galaxies. The cluster virial mass function agrees well with recent estimates from both X-ray observations and cluster richnesses. The mass function lies between those predicted by the First-Year and Three-Year WMAP data. We constrain the cosmological parameters $\Omega_m$ and $\sigma_8$ and find good agreement with WMAP and constraints from other techniques. With the CIRS mass function alone, we estimate $\Omega_m=0.24^{+0.14}_{-0.09}$ and $\sigma_8=0.92^{+0.24}_{-0.19}$, or $\sigma_8=0.84\pm$0.03 when holding $\Omega_m=0.3$ fixed. We also use the WMAP parameters as priors and constrain velocity segregation in clusters. Using the First and Third-Year results, we infer velocity segregation of $\sigma_{gxy}/\sigma_{DM}\approx0.94\pm$0.05 or 1.28$\pm$0.06 respectively. We compare the velocity dispersion function of clusters to that of early-type galaxies and conclude that clusters comprise the high-velocity end of the velocity dispersion function of dark matter haloes. The evolution of cluster abundances provides constraints on dark energy models; the mass function presented here offers an important low redshift calibration benchmark.
  • We use the Fourth Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey to test the ubiquity of infall patterns around galaxy clusters and measure cluster mass profiles to large radii. We match X-ray cluster catalogs with SDSS, search for infall patterns, and compute mass profiles for a complete sample of X-ray selected clusters. Very clean infall patterns are apparent in most of the clusters, with the fraction decreasing with increasing redshift due to shallower sampling. All 72 clusters in a well-defined sample limited by redshift (ensuring good sampling) and X-ray flux (excluding superpositions) show infall patterns sufficient to apply the caustic technique. This sample is by far the largest sample of cluster mass profiles extending to large radii to date. Similar to CAIRNS, cluster infall patterns are better defined in observations than in simulations. Further work is needed to determine the source of this difference. We use the infall patterns to compute mass profiles for 72 clusters and compare them to model profiles. Cluster scaling relations using caustic masses agree well with those using X-ray or virial mass estimates, confirming the reliability of the caustic technique. We confirm the conclusion of CAIRNS that cluster infall regions are well fit by NFW and Hernquist profiles and poorly fit by singular isothermal spheres. This much larger sample enables new comparisons of cluster properties with those in simulations. The shapes (specifically, NFW concentrations) of the mass profiles agree well with the predictions of simulations. The mass inside the turnaround radius is on average 2.19$\pm$0.18 times that within the virial radius. This ratio agrees well with recent predictions from simulations of the final masses of dark matter haloes.
  • We investigate the environmental dependence of star formation in cluster virial regions and infall regions as part of CAIRNS (Cluster And Infall Region Nearby Survey), a large spectroscopic survey of the infall regions surrounding nine nearby rich clusters of galaxies. Our long-slit spectroscopy yields estimates of star formation rates in environments from cluster cores to the general large-scale structure. The fraction of galaxies with current star formation in their inner disks as traced by H-alpha emission increases with distance from the cluster and converges to the ``field'' value only at 2-3 virial radii, in agreement with other investigations. However, among galaxies with significant current star formation (EW[Ha]geq2\AA), there is no difference in the distribution of EW[Ha] inside and outside the virial radius. This surprising result, first seen by Carter et al., suggests that (1) star formation is truncated on either very short timescales or only at moderate and high redshifts or (2) that projection effects contaminate the measurement. The number density profiles of star-forming and non-star-forming galaxies indicate that, among galaxies projected inside the virial radius, at least half of the former and 20% of the latter are ``infall interlopers,'' galaxies in the infall region but outside the virial region. The kinematics of star-forming galaxies in the infall region closely match those of absorption-dominated galaxies. This result shows that the star forming galaxies in the infall regions are not interlopers from the field and excludes one model of the backsplash scenario of galaxy transformation. Finally, we quantify systematic uncertainties in estimating the global star formation in galaxies from their inner disks.