• We constrain the stellar population properties of a sample of 52 massive galaxies, with stellar mass $\log M_s/M_\odot>10.5$, over the redshift range 0.5<z<2 by use of observer-frame optical and near-infrared slitless spectra from Hubble Space Telescope ACS and WFC3 grisms. The deep exposures allow us to target individual spectra of massive galaxies to F160W=22.5AB. Our fitting approach uses a set of six base models adapted to the redshift and spectral resolution of each observation, and fits the weights of the base models via a MCMC method. The sample comprises a mixed distribution of quiescent (19) and star-forming galaxies (33). Using the cumulative distribution of stellar ages by mass, we define a "quenching timescale" that is found to correlate with stellar mass. The other population parameters, aside from metallicity, do not show such a strong correlation, although all display the characteristic segregation between quiescent and star-forming populations. Radial colour gradients within each galaxy are also explored, finding a wider scatter in the star-forming subsample, but no conclusive trend with respect to the population parameters. Environment is also studied, with at most a subtle effect towards older ages in high-density environments.
  • We improve the accuracy of photometric redshifts by including low-resolution spectral data from the G102 grism on the Hubble Space Telescope, which assists in redshift determination by further constraining the shape of the broadband Spectral Energy Disribution (SED) and identifying spectral features. The photometry used in the redshift fits includes near-IR photometry from FIGS+CANDELS, as well as optical data from ground-based surveys and HST ACS, and mid-IR data from Spitzer. We calculated the redshifts through the comparison of measured photometry with template galaxy models, using the EAZY photometric redshift code. For objects with F105W $< 26.5$ AB mag with a redshift range of $0 < z < 6$, we find a typical error of $\Delta z = 0.03 * (1+z)$ for the purely photometric redshifts; with the addition of FIGS spectra, these become $\Delta z = 0.02 * (1+z)$, an improvement of 50\%. Addition of grism data also reduces the outlier rate from 8\% to 7\% across all fields. With the more-accurate spectrophotometric redshifts (SPZs), we searched the FIGS fields for galaxy overdensities. We identified 24 overdensities across the 4 fields. The strongest overdensity, matching a spectroscopically identified cluster at $z=0.85$, has 28 potential member galaxies, of which 8 have previous spectroscopic confirmation, and features a corresponding X-ray signal. Another corresponding to a cluster at $z=1.84$ has 22 members, 18 of which are spectroscopically confirmed. Additionally, we find 4 overdensities that are detected at an equal or higher significance in at least one metric to the two confirmed clusters.
  • We present a new database of our two-dimensional bulge-disk decompositions for 14,233 galaxies drawn from SDSS DR12 in order to examine the properties of bulges residing in the local universe ($0.005 < z < 0.05$). We performed decompositions in $g$ and $r$ bands by utilizing the {\sc{galfit}} software. The bulge colors and bulge-to-total ratios are found to be sensitive to the details in the decomposition technique, and hence we hereby provide full details of our method. The $g-r$ colors of bulges derived are almost constantly red regardless of bulge size except for the bulges in the low bulge-to-total ratio galaxies ($B/T_{\rm r} \lesssim 0.3$). Bulges exhibit similar scaling relations to those followed by elliptical galaxies, but the bulges in galaxies with lower bulge-to-total ratios clearly show a gradually larger departure in slope from the elliptical galaxy sequence. The scatters around the scaling relations are also larger for the bulges in galaxies with lower bulge-to-total ratios. Both the departure in slopes and larger scatters are likely originated from the presence of young stars. The bulges in galaxies with low bulge-to-total ratios show signs of a frosting of young stars so substantial that their luminosity-weighted Balmer-line ages are as small as 1\,Gyr in some cases. While bulges seem largely similar in optical properties to elliptical galaxies, they do show clear and systematic departures as a function of bulge-to-total ratio. The stellar properties and perhaps associated formation processes of bulges seem much more diverse than those of elliptical galaxies.