• Many experiments in the field of quantum foundations seek to adjudicate between quantum theory and speculative alternatives to it. This requires one to analyze the experimental data in a manner that does not presume the correctness of the quantum formalism. The mathematical framework of generalized probabilistic theories (GPTs) provides a means of doing so. We present a scheme for determining which GPTs are consistent with a given set of experimental data. It proceeds by performing tomography on the preparations and measurements in a self-consistent manner, i.e., without presuming a prior characterization of either. We illustrate the scheme by analyzing experimental data for a large set of preparations and measurements on the polarization degree of freedom of a single photon. We find that the smallest and largest GPT state spaces consistent with our data are a pair of polytopes, each approximating the shape of the Bloch Sphere and having a volume ratio of $0.977 \pm 0.001$, which provides a quantitative bound on the scope for deviations from quantum theory. We also demonstrate how our scheme can be used to bound the extent to which nature might be more nonlocal than quantum theory predicts, as well as the extent to which it might be more or less contextual. Specifically, we find that the maximal violation of the CHSH inequality can be at most $1.3\% \pm 0.1$ greater than the quantum prediction, and the maximal violation of a particular inequality for universal noncontextuality can not differ from the quantum prediction by more than this factor on either side. The most significant loophole in this sort of analysis is that the set of preparations and measurements one implements might fail to be tomographically complete for the system of interest.
  • Many quantum advantages in metrology and communication arise from interferometric phenomena. Such phenomena can occur on ultrafast time scales, particularly when energy-time entangled photons are employed. These have been relatively unexplored as their observation necessitates time resolution much shorter than conventional photon counters. Integrating nonlinear optical gating with conventional photon counters can overcome this limitation and enable subpicosecond time resolution. Here, using this technique and a Franson interferometer, we demonstrate high-visibility quantum interference with two entangled photons, where the one- and two-photon coherence times are both subpicosecond. We directly observe the spectral and temporal interference patterns, measure a visibility in the two-photon coincidence rate of $(85.3\pm0.4)\%$, and report a CHSH-Bell parameter of $2.42\pm0.02$, violating the local-hidden variable bound by 21 standard deviations. The demonstration of energy-time entanglement with ultrafast interferometry provides opportunities for examining and exploiting entanglement in previously inaccessible regimes.
  • Understanding the causal influences that hold among parts of a system is critical both to explaining that system's natural behaviour and to controlling it through targeted interventions. In a quantum world, understanding causal relations is equally important, but the set of possibilities is far richer. The two basic ways in which a pair of time-ordered quantum systems may be causally related are by a cause-effect mechanism or by a common cause acting on both. Here, we show a coherent mixture of these two possibilities. We realize this nonclassical causal relation in a quantum optics experiment and derive a set of criteria for witnessing the coherence based on a quantum version of Berkson's effect, whereby two independent causes can become correlated upon observation of their common effect. The interplay of causality and quantum theory lies at the heart of challenging foundational puzzles, including Bell's theorem and the search for quantum gravity.
  • Energy-time entangled photons are critical in many quantum optical phenomena and have emerged as important elements in quantum information protocols. Entanglement in this degree of freedom often manifests itself on ultrafast timescales making it very difficult to detect, whether one employs direct or interferometric techniques, as photon-counting detectors have insufficient time resolution. Here, we implement ultrafast photon counters based on nonlinear interactions and strong femtosecond laser pulses to probe energy-time entanglement in this important regime. Using this technique and single-photon spectrometers, we characterize all the spectral and temporal correlations of two entangled photons with femtosecond resolution. This enables the witnessing of energy-time entanglement using uncertainty relations and the direct observation of nonlocal dispersion cancellation on ultrafast timescales. These techniques are essential to understand and control the energy-time degree of freedom of light for ultrafast quantum optics.
  • The landscape of causal relations that can hold among a set of systems in quantum theory is richer than in classical physics. In particular, a pair of time-ordered systems can be related as cause and effect or as the effects of a common cause, and each of these causal mechanisms can be coherent or not. Furthermore, one can combine these mechanisms in different ways: by probabilistically realizing either one or the other or by having both act simultaneously (termed a physical mixture). In the latter case, it is possible for the two mechanisms to be combined quantum-coherently. Previous work has shown how to experimentally realize one example of each class of possible causal relations. Here, we make a theoretical and experimental study of the transitions between these classes. In particular, for each of the two distinct types of coherence that can exist in mixtures of common-cause and cause-effect relations--coherence in the individual causal pathways and coherence in the way the causal relations are combined--we determine how it degrades under noise and we confirm these expectations in a quantum-optical experiment.
  • Bulk diamond phonons have been shown to be a versatile platform for the generation, storage, and manipulation of high-bandwidth quantum states of light. Here we demonstrate a diamond quantum memory that stores, and releases on demand, an arbitrarily polarized $\sim$250 fs duration photonic qubit. The single-mode nature of the memory is overcome by mapping the two degrees of polarization of the qubit, via Raman transitions, onto two spatially distinct optical phonon modes located in the same diamond crystal. The two modes are coherently recombined upon retrieval and quantum process tomography confirms that the memory faithfully reproduces the input state with average fidelity $0.784\pm0.004$ with a total memory efficiency of $(0.76\pm0.03)\%$. In an additional demonstration, one photon of a polarization-entangled pair is stored in the memory. We report that entanglement persists in the retrieved state for up to 1.3 ps of storage time. These results demonstrate that the diamond phonon platform can be used in concert with polarization qubits, a key requirement for polarization-encoded photonic processing.
  • Multiparticle quantum interference is critical for our understanding and exploitation of quantum information, and for fundamental tests of quantum mechanics. A remarkable example of multi-partite correlations is exhibited by the Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger (GHZ) state. In a GHZ state, three particles are correlated while no pairwise correlation is found. The manifestation of these strong correlations in an interferometric setting has been studied theoretically since 1990 but no three-photon GHZ interferometer has been realized experimentally. Here we demonstrate three-photon interference that does not originate from two-photon or single photon interference. We observe phase-dependent variation of three-photon coincidences with 90.5 \pm 5.0 % visibility in a generalized Franson interferometer using energy-time entangled photon triplets. The demonstration of these strong correlations in an interferometric setting provides new avenues for multiphoton interferometry, fundamental tests of quantum mechanics and quantum information applications in higher dimensions.
  • In the same manner that free-space propagation and curved glass lenses are used to shape the spatial properties of light, a combination of chromatic dispersion and devices known as time lenses may be used to reshape its temporal properties. These techniques have found extensive application in classical optical signal processing based on nonlinear optics. A new set of challenges presents itself when processing quantum signals, including noise suppression and high fidelity requirements. In this work, we construct a single-photon time lens based on dispersion and nonlinear sum-frequency generation to image the spectral waveform of half of an entangled photon pair. We find that the joint spectrum of the photon pair has strongly negative frequency correlations before the time lens and strongly positive correlations afterwards, verifying that the process has an overall negative spectro-temporal magnification. The temporal imaging of energy-time entangled systems opens up a host of new possible techniques for distinctly quantum tasks in the frequency domain, including state engineering, and our results demonstrate that the upconversion time lens is an essential part of the single-photon waveform manipulation toolkit.
  • We present an implementation of photonic qubit precertification that performs the delicate task of detecting the presence of a flying photon without destroying its qubit state, allowing loss-sensitive quantum cryptography and tests of nonlocality even over long distance. By splitting an incoming single photon in two via parametric down-conversion, we herald the photon's arrival from an independent photon source while preserving its quantum information with up to $92.3\pm0.6$ % fidelity. With reduced detector dark counts, precertification will be immediately useful in quantum communication.
  • We examine the problem of finding the minimum number of Pauli measurements needed to uniquely determine an arbitrary $n$-qubit pure state among all quantum states. We show that only $11$ Pauli measurements are needed to determine an arbitrary two-qubit pure state compared to the full quantum state tomography with $16$ measurements, and only $31$ Pauli measurements are needed to determine an arbitrary three-qubit pure state compared to the full quantum state tomography with $64$ measurements. We demonstrate that our protocol is robust under depolarizing error with simulated random pure states. We experimentally test the protocol on two- and three-qubit systems with nuclear magnetic resonance techniques. We show that the pure state tomography protocol saves us a number of measurements without considerable loss of fidelity. We compare our protocol with same-size sets of randomly selected Pauli operators and find that our selected set of Pauli measurements significantly outperforms those random sampling sets. As a direct application, our scheme can also be used to reduce the number of settings needed for pure-state tomography in quantum optical systems.
  • Controlling the properties of single photons is essential for a wide array of emerging optical quantum technologies spanning quantum sensing, quantum computing, and quantum communications. Essential components for these technologies include single photon sources, quantum memories, waveguides, and detectors. The ideal spectral operating parameters (wavelength and bandwidth) of these components are rarely similar; thus, frequency conversion and spectral control are key enabling steps for component hybridization. Here we perform signal processing of single photons by coherently manipulating their spectra via a modified quantum memory. We store 723.5 nm photons, with 4.1 nm bandwidth, in a room-temperature diamond crystal; upon retrieval we demonstrate centre frequency tunability over 4.2 times the input bandwidth, and bandwidth modulation between 0.5 to 1.9 times the input bandwidth. Our results demonstrate the potential for diamond, and Raman memories in general, to be an integrated platform for photon storage and spectral conversion.
  • To make precise the sense in which nature fails to respect classical physics, one requires a formal notion of classicality. Ideally, such a notion should be defined operationally, so that it can be subjected to a direct experimental test, and it should be applicable in a wide variety of experimental scenarios, so that it can cover the breadth of phenomena that are thought to defy classical understanding. Bell's notion of local causality fulfills the first criterion but not the second. The notion of noncontextuality fulfills the second criterion, but it is a long-standing question whether it can be made to fulfill the first. Previous attempts to experimentally test noncontextuality have all presumed certain idealizations that do not hold in real experiments, namely, noiseless measurements and exact operational equivalences. We here show how to devise tests that are free of these idealizations. We also perform a photonic implementation of one such test that rules out noncontextual models with high confidence.
  • The optimal properties for single photons may vary drastically between different quantum technologies. Along with central frequency conversion, control over photonic temporal waveforms will be paramount to the effective coupling of different quantum systems and efficient distribution of quantum information. Through the application of pulse shaping and the nonlinear optical process of sum-frequency generation, we examine a framework for manipulation of single-photon waveforms. We use a non-perturbative treatment to determine the parameter regime in which both high-efficiency and high-fidelity conversion may be achieved for Gaussian waveforms and study the effect such conversion techniques have on energy-time entanglement. Additionally, we prove that aberrations due to time ordering are negligible when the phasematching is nonrestrictive over the input bandwidths. Our calculations show that ideal quantum optical waveform conversion and quantum time lensing may be fully realized using these techniques.
  • Maximizing the information transmission rate through quantum channels is essential for practical implementation of quantum communication. Time-division multiplexing is an approach for which the ultimate rate requires the ability to manipulate and detect single photons on ultrafast timescales while preserving their quantum correlations. Here we demonstrate the demultiplexing of a train of pulsed single photons using time-to-frequency conversion while preserving their polarization entanglement with a partner photon. Our technique converts a pulse train with 2.69 ps spacing to a frequency comb with 307 GHz spacing which may be resolved using diffraction techniques. Our work enables ultrafast multiplexing of quantum information with commercially available single-photon detectors.
  • We report the storage and retrieval of single photons, via a quantum memory, in the optical phonons of room-temperature bulk diamond. The THz-bandwidth heralded photons are generated by spontaneous parametric downconversion and mapped to phonons via a Raman transition, stored for a variable delay, and released on demand. The second-order correlation of the memory output is $g^{(2)}(0) = 0.65 \pm 0.07$, demonstrating preservation of non-classical photon statistics throughout storage and retrieval. The memory is low-noise, high-speed and broadly tunable; it therefore promises to be a versatile light-matter interface for local quantum processing applications.
  • The problem of using observed correlations to infer causal relations is relevant to a wide variety of scientific disciplines. Yet given correlations between just two classical variables, it is impossible to determine whether they arose from a causal influence of one on the other or a common cause influencing both, unless one can implement a randomized intervention. We here consider the problem of causal inference for quantum variables. We introduce causal tomography, which unifies and generalizes conventional quantum tomography schemes to provide a complete solution to the causal inference problem using a quantum analogue of a randomized trial. We furthermore show that, in contrast to the classical case, observed quantum correlations alone can sometimes provide a solution. We implement a quantum-optical experiment that allows us to control the causal relation between two optical modes, and two measurement schemes -- one with and one without randomization -- that extract this relation from the observed correlations. Our results show that entanglement and coherence, known to be central to quantum information processing, also provide a quantum advantage for causal inference.
  • Non-classical states of light are of fundamental importance for emerging quantum technologies. All optics experiments producing multi-qubit entangled states have until now relied on outcome post-selection, a procedure where only the measurement results corresponding to the desired state are considered. This method severely limits the usefulness of the resulting entangled states. Here, we show the direct production of polarization-entangled photon triplets by cascading two entangled downconversion processes. Detecting the triplets with high efficiency superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors allows us to fully characterize them through quantum state tomography. We use our three-photon entangled state to demonstrate the ability to herald Bell states, a task which was not possible with previous three-photon states, and test local realism by violating the Mermin and Svetlichny inequalities. These results represent a significant breakthrough for entangled multi-photon state production by eliminating the constraints of outcome post-selection, providing a novel resource for optical quantum information processing.
  • The ability to uniquely identify a quantum state is integral to quantum science, but for non-orthogonal states, quantum mechanics precludes deterministic, error-free discrimination. However, using the non-deterministic protocol of unambiguous state discrimination (USD) enables error-free differentiation of states, at the cost of a lower frequency of success. We discriminate experimentally between non-orthogonal, high-dimensional states encoded in single photons; our results range from dimension $d=2$ to $d=14$. We quantify the performance of our method by comparing the total measured error rate to the theoretical rate predicted by minimum-error state discrimination. For the chosen states, we find a lower error rate by more than one standard deviation for dimensions up to $d=12$. This method will find immediate application in high-dimensional implementations of quantum information protocols, such as quantum cryptography.
  • Photons are critical to quantum technologies since they can be used for virtually all quantum information tasks: in quantum metrology, as the information carrier in photonic quantum computation, as a mediator in hybrid systems, and to establish long distance networks. The physical characteristics of photons in these applications differ drastically; spectral bandwidths span 12 orders of magnitude from 50 THz for quantum-optical coherence tomography to 50 Hz for certain quantum memories. Combining these technologies requires coherent interfaces that reversibly map centre frequencies and bandwidths of photons to avoid excessive loss. Here we demonstrate bandwidth compression of single photons by a factor 40 and tunability over a range 70 times that bandwidth via sum-frequency generation with chirped laser pulses. This constitutes a time-to-frequency interface for light capable of converting time-bin to colour entanglement and enables ultrafast timing measurements. It is a step toward arbitrary waveform generation for single and entangled photons.
  • Time-bin encoding is a robust form of optical quantum information, especially for transmission in optical fibers. To read out the information, the separation of the time bins must be larger than the detector time resolution, typically on the order of nanoseconds for photon counters. In the present work, we demonstrate a technique using a nonlinear interaction between chirped entangled time-bin photons and shaped laser pulses to perform projective measurements on arbitrary time-bin states with picosecond-scale separations. We demonstrate a tomographically-complete set of time-bin qubit projective measurements and show the fidelity of operations is sufficiently high to violate the CHSH-Bell inequality by more than 6 standard deviations.
  • The double-slit experiment strikingly demonstrates the wave-particle duality of quantum objects. In this famous experiment, particles pass one-by-one through a pair of slits and are detected on a distant screen. A distinct wave-like pattern emerges after many discrete particle impacts as if each particle is passing through both slits and interfering with itself. While the direct event-by-event buildup of this interference pattern has been observed for massive particles such as electrons, neutrons, atoms and molecules, it has not yet been measured for massless particles like photons. Here we present a temporally- and spatially-resolved measurement of the double-slit interference pattern using single photons. We send single photons through a birefringent double-slit apparatus and use a linear array of single-photon detectors to observe the developing interference pattern. The analysis of the buildup allows us to compare quantum mechanics and the corpuscular model, which aims to explain the mystery of single-particle interference. Finally, we send one photon from an entangled pair through our double-slit setup and show the dependence of the resulting interference pattern on the twin photon's measured state. Our results provide new insight into the dynamics of the buildup process in the double-slit experiment, and can be used as a valuable resource in quantum information applications.
  • Any experiment attempting to verify the presence of entanglement in a physical system can only generate a finite amount of data. The statement that entanglement was present in the system can thus never be issued with certainty, requiring instead a statistical analysis of the data. Because entanglement plays a central role in the performance of quantum devices, it is crucial to make statistical claims in entanglement verification experiments that are reliable and have a clear interpretation. In this work, we apply recent results by M. Christandl and R. Renner to construct a reliable entanglement verification procedure based on the concept of confidence regions. The statements made do not require the specification of a prior distribution, the assumption of independent measurements nor the assumption of an independent and identically distributed (i.i.d.) source of states. Moreover, we develop numerical tools that are necessary to employ this approach in practice, rendering the procedure ready to be applied to current experiments. We demonstrate this technique by analyzing the data of a photonic experiment generating two-photon states whose entanglement is verified with the use of an accessible nonlinear witness.
  • Entangled quantum particles have correlations stronger than those allowed by classical physics. These correlations are the focus of of the deepest issues in quantum mechanics [1-3] and are the basis of many quantum technologies. The entanglement of discrete particle properties has been studied extensively in the context of quantum computing [4], cryptography [5], and quantum repeaters [6] while entanglement between the continuous properties of particles may play a critical role in improving the sensitivity of gravitational wave detectors [7,8], atomic clocks [9], and other high precision instruments. The attributes of three or more entangled particles are fundamentally different from those of two entangled particles [10-14]. While the discrete variables of up to 14 ions [15] and the continuous variables between three intense optical beams [16, 17] have been entangled, it has remained an open challenge to entangle the continuous properties of more than two individual particles. Here we experimentally demonstrate genuine tripartite continuous-variable entanglement between three separated particles. In our setup the three particles are photons created directly from a single input photon; the creation process leads to quantum correlations between the colours, or energies, and emission times of the photons. The entanglement between our three photons is the three-party generalization of the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) [1] correlations for continuous variables, and allows for new fundamental tests of quantum mechanics to be carried out. Our scheme can be extended to carry out multi-particle Franson interferometry [18,19], and opens the possibility of using additional degrees of freedom in our photons to simultaneously engineer discrete and continuous-variable hyper-entangled states that could serve as a valuable resource in a wide variety of quantum information tasks.
  • We experimentally demonstrate a single-qubit decohering quantum channel using linear optics. We implement the channel, whose special cases include both the amplitude-damping channel and the bit-flip channel, using a single, static optical setup. Following a recent theoretical result [M. Piani et al., Phys. Rev. A, 84, 032304 (2011)], we realize the channel in an optimal way, maximizing the probability of success, i.e., the probability for the photonic qubit to remain in its encoding. Using a two-photon entangled resource, we characterize the channel using ancilla-assisted process tomography and find average process fidelities of 0.9808 \pm 0.0002 and 0.9762 \pm 0.0002 for amplitude-damping and the bit-flip case, respectively.
  • Heisenberg's uncertainty principle provides a fundamental limitation on an observer's ability to simultaneously predict the outcome when one of two measurements is performed on a quantum system. However, if the observer has access to a particle (stored in a quantum memory) which is entangled with the system, his uncertainty is generally reduced. This effect has recently been quantified by Berta et al. [Nature Physics 6, 659 (2010)] in a new, more general uncertainty relation, formulated in terms of entropies. Using entangled photon pairs, an optical delay line serving as a quantum memory and fast, active feed-forward we experimentally probe the validity of this new relation. The behaviour we find agrees with the predictions of quantum theory and satisfies the new uncertainty relation. In particular, we find lower uncertainties about the measurement outcomes than would be possible without the entangled particle. This shows not only that the reduction in uncertainty enabled by entanglement can be significant in practice, but also demonstrates the use of the inequality to witness entanglement.