• Over the course of 3.1 years we determined the position of Mars on 75 dates using a handheld cross staff and two to five bright reference stars of known right ascension and declination on each occasion. On average the observed positions of Mars are within +/- 11 arc minutes of the true ecliptic latitudes and ecliptic longitudes. After deriving the two dates of opposition to the Sun, we were able to carry out a two stage analytical experiment on Mars' orbit. From the 2015/2016 data we obtain a value of the eccentricity of 0.093 +/- 0.012. The 2015/2016 data can be fit reasonably well by adopting a circular orbit for the Earth, but the 2017/2018 data must be fit with an ellipse for Mars and an ellipse for the Earth. Applying the two ellipse model to the 2015/2016 data, we obtain an RMS error of the ecliptic longitudes of only +/- 7.5 arc minutes. While Kepler was able to derive the shape of Mars' orbit while relying on data of Tycho Brahe accurate to +/- 2 arc minutes, today we may assume an ellptical orbit, and we can show that much less accurate data are consistent with an ellipse having an eccentricity equal to the modern accepted value of 0.0934, within the errors.
  • We present detailed ultraviolet, optical and near-infrared light curves of the Type Ia supernova (SN) 2012fr, which exploded in the Fornax cluster member NGC 1365. These precise high-cadence light curves provide a dense coverage of the flux evolution from $-$12 to $+$140 days with respect to the epoch of $B$-band maximum (\tmax). Supplementary imaging at the earliest epochs reveals an initial slow, nearly linear rise in luminosity with a duration of $\sim$2.5 days, followed by a faster rising phase that is well reproduced by an explosion model with a moderate amount of $^{56}$Ni mixing in the ejecta. From an analysis of the light curves, we conclude: $(i)$ explosion occurred $< 22$ hours before the first detection of the supernova, $(ii)$ the rise time to peak bolometric ($\lambda > 1800 $\AA) luminosity was $16.5 \pm 0.6$ days, $(iii)$ the supernova suffered little or no host-galaxy dust reddening, $(iv)$ the peak luminosity in both the optical and near-infrared was consistent with the bright end of normal Type Ia diversity, and $(v)$ $0.60 \pm 0.15 M_{\odot}$ of $^{56}$Ni was synthesized in the explosion. Despite its normal luminosity, SN 2012fr displayed unusually prevalent high-velocity \ion{Ca}{2} and \ion{Si}{2} absorption features, and a nearly constant photospheric velocity of the \ion{Si}{2} $\lambda$6355 line at $\sim$12,000 \kms\ beginning $\sim$5 days before \tmax. Other peculiarities in the early phase photometry and the spectral evolution are highlighted. SN 2012fr also adds to a growing number of Type Ia supernovae hosted by galaxies with direct Cepheid distance measurements.
  • We present final natural system optical (ugriBV) and near-infrared (YJH) photometry of 134 supernovae (SNe) with probable white dwarf progenitors that were observed in 2004-2009 as part of the first stage of the Carnegie Supernova Project (CSP-I). The sample consists of 123 Type Ia SNe, 5 Type Iax SNe, 2 super-Chandrasekhar SN candidates, 2 Type Ia SNe interacting with circumstellar matter, and 2 SN 2006bt-like events. The redshifts of the objects range from z = 0.0037 to 0.0835; the median redshift is 0.0241. For 120 (90%) of these SNe, near-infrared photometry was obtained. Average optical extinction coefficients and color terms are derived and demonstrated to be stable during the five CSP-I observing campaigns. Measurements of the CSP-I near-infrared bandpasses are also described, and near-infrared color terms are estimated through synthetic photometry of stellar atmosphere models. Optical and near-infrared magnitudes of local sequences of tertiary standard stars for each supernova are given, and a new calibration of Y-band magnitudes of the Persson et al. (1998) standards in the CSP-I natural system is presented.
  • We present 888 visual-wavelength spectra of 122 nearby type II supernovae (SNe II) obtained between 1986 and 2009, and ranging between 3 and 363 days post explosion. In this first paper, we outline our observations and data reduction techniques, together with a characterization based on the spectral diversity of SNe~II. A statistical analysis of the spectral matching technique is discussed as an alternative to non-detection constraints for estimating SN explosion epochs. The time evolution of spectral lines is presented and analysed in terms of how this differs for SNe of different photometric, spectral, and environmental properties: velocities, pseudo-equivalent widths, decline rates, magnitudes, time durations, and environment metallicity. Our sample displays a large range in ejecta expansion velocities, from $\sim9600$ to $\sim1500$ km s$^{-1}$ at 50 days post explosion with a median H$_{\alpha}$ value of 7300 km s$^{-1}$. This is most likely explained through differing explosion energies. Significant diversity is also observed in the absolute strength of spectral lines, characterised through their pseudo-equivalent widths. This implies significant diversity in both temperature evolution (linked to progenitor radius) and progenitor metallicity between different SNe~II. Around 60\% of our sample show an extra absorption component on the blue side of the H$_{\alpha}$ P-Cygni profile ("Cachito" feature) between 7 and 120 days since explosion. Studying the nature of Cachito, we conclude that these features at early times (before $\sim35$ days) are associated with \ion{Si}{2} $\lambda6355$, while past the middle of the plateau phase they are related to high velocity (HV) features of hydrogen lines.
  • We obtained spectra of 26 bright stars in the southern sky, including Sirius, Canopus, Betelgeuse, Rigel, Bellatrix, and Procyon, using the 1.5-m telescope at Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory and its grating spectrograph RCSPEC. A 7.5 magnitude neutral density filter was used to keep from saturating the CCD. Our spectra are tied to a Kurucz model of Sirius with T = 9850 K, log g = 4.30, and [Fe/H] =+0.4. Since Sirius is much less problematic than using Vega as a fundamental calibrator, the synthetic photometry of our stars constitutes a Sirius-based system that could be used as a new anchor for stellar and extragalactic photometric measurements.
  • The ESSENCE survey discovered 213 Type Ia supernovae at redshifts 0.1 < z < 0.81 between 2002 and 2008. We present their R and I-band photometry, measured from images obtained using the MOSAIC II camera at the CTIO 4 m Blanco telescope, along with rapid-response spectroscopy for each object. We use our spectroscopic follow-up observations to determine an accurate, quantitative classification and a precise redshift. Through an extensive calibration program we have improved the precision of the CTIO Blanco natural photometric system. We use several empirical metrics to measure our internal photometric consistency and our absolute calibration of the survey. We assess the effect of various potential sources of systematic bias on our measured fluxes, and we estimate that the dominant term in the systematic error budget from the photometric calibration on our absolute fluxes is ~1%.
  • We present a compilation of UBV RIz light curves of 51 type II supernovae discovered during the course of four different surveys during 1986 to 2003: the Cerro Tololo Supernova Survey, the Calan/Tololo Supernova Program (C&T), the Supernova Optical and Infrared Survey (SOIRS), and the Carnegie Type II Supernova Survey (CATS). The photometry is based on template-subtracted images to eliminate any potential host galaxy light contamination, and calibrated from foreground stars. This work presents these photometric data, studies the color evolution using different bands, and explores the relation between the magnitude at maximum brightness and the brightness decline parameter (s) from maximum light through the end of the recombination phase. This parameter is found to be shallower for redder bands and appears to have the best correlation in the B band. In addition, it also correlates with the plateau duration, being thus shorter (longer) for larger (smaller) s values.
  • Using CCD observations of a candle flame situated at a distance of 338 m and calibrated with observations of Vega, we show that a candle flame situated at ~2.6 km (1.6 miles) is comparable in brightness to a 6th magnitude star with the spectral energy distribution of Vega. The human eye cannot detect a candle flame at 10 miles or further, as some statements on the web suggest.
  • We present BV and u'g'r'i' CCD photometry of the central region of NGC 2482. We also present BVu'g' CCD photometry of five clusters that have been poorly studied in the past: Ruprecht 42, Ruprecht 51, Ruprecht 153, Ruprecht 154; and AH03 J0748-26.9, which to our knowledge has not been studied before. Using a global optimization technique that eliminates much of the subjectivity previously inherent in main sequence fitting studies, we obtain values of the distances, ages, and metallicities of the clusters, with robust estimates of the uncertainties of these fundamental parameters. Four of our clusters are less than ~1.3 kpc beyond the Sun's distance from the Galactic Center and have essentially solar metallicity. The metallicities of those clusters more distant from the Galactic Center are consistent with a 0.3 dex step to lower [Fe/H] found in other studies.
  • We present optical and ultraviolet (UV) photometry and spectra of the very nearby and highly reddened supernova (SN) 2014J in M82 obtained with the Swift Ultra-Violet/Optical Telescope (UVOT). Comparison of the UVOT grism spectra of SN~2014J with Hubble Space Telescope observations of SN2011fe or UVOT grism spectra of SN~2012fr are consistent with an extinction law with a low value of R_V~1.4. The high reddening causes the detected photon distribution in the broadband UV filters to have a much longer effective wavelength than for an unreddened SN. The light curve evolution is consistent with this shift and does not show a flattening due to photons being scattered back into the line of sight. The light curve shapes and color evolution are inconsistent with a contribution scattered into the line of sight by circumstellar dust. We conclude that most or all of the high reddening must come from interstellar dust. We show that even for a single dust composition, there is not a unique reddening law caused by circumstellar scattering. Rather, when considering scattering from a time-variable source, we confirm earlier studies that the reddening law is a function of the dust geometry, column density, and epoch. We also show how an assumed geometry of dust as a foreground sheet in mixed stellar/dust systems will lead to a higher inferred R_V. Rather than assuming the dust around SNe is peculiar, SNe may be useful probes of the interstellar reddening laws in other galaxies.
  • We present well-sampled $UBVRIJHK$ photometry of SN 2002fk starting 12 days before maximum light through 122 days after peak brightness, along with a series of 15 optical spectra from -4 to +95 days since maximum. Our observations show the presence of C II lines in the early-time spectra of SN 2002fk, expanding at ~11,000 km s$^{-1}~$ and persisting until ~8 days past maximum light with a velocity of $\sim$9,000 km s$^{-1}~$. SN 2002fk is characterized by a small velocity gradient of $\dot v_{Si~II}=26$ km s$^{-1}$ day$^{-1}$, possibly caused by an off-center explosion with the ignition region oriented towards the observer. The connection between viewing angle of an off-center explosion and the presence of C II in the early time spectrum suggests that the observation of C II could be also due to a viewing angle effect. Adopting the Cepheid distance to NGC 1309 we provide the first $H_{0}$ value based on near-IR measurements of a Type Ia supernova between 63.0$\pm$ 0.8 ($\pm$ 2.8 systematic) and 66.7$\pm$1.0 ($\pm$ 3.5 systematic) km/s/Mpc, depending on the absolute magnitude/decline rate relationship adopted. It appears that the near-IR yields somewhat lower (6-9 %) $H_0$ values than the optical. It is essential to further examine this issue by (1) expanding the sample of high-quality near-IR light curves of SNe in the Hubble flow, and (2) increasing the number of nearby SNe with near-IR SN light curves and precise Cepheid distances, which affords the promise to deliver a more precise determination of $H_0$.
  • We present an analysis of the diversity of V-band light-curves of hydrogen-rich type II supernovae. Analyzing a sample of 116 supernovae, several magnitude measurements are defined, together with decline rates at different epochs, and time durations of different phases. It is found that magnitudes measured at maximum light correlate more strongly with decline rates than those measured at other epochs: brighter supernovae at maximum generally have faster declining light-curves at all epochs. We find a relation between the decline rate during the 'plateau' phase and peak magnitudes, which has a dispersion of 0.56 magnitudes, offering the prospect of using type II supernovae as purely photometric distance indicators. Our analysis suggests that the type II population spans a continuum from low-luminosity events which have flat light-curves during the 'plateau' stage, through to the brightest events which decline much faster. A large range in optically thick phase durations is observed, implying a range in progenitor envelope masses at the epoch of explosion. During the radioactive tails, we find many supernovae with faster declining light-curves than expected from full trapping of radioactive emission, implying low mass ejecta. It is suggested that the main driver of light-curve diversity is the extent of hydrogen envelopes retained before explosion. Finally, a new classification scheme is introduced where hydrogen-rich events are typed as simply 'SNII' with an s2 value giving the decline rate during the 'plateau' phase, indicating its morphological type.
  • Among Type Ia supernovae (SNe~Ia) exist a class of overluminous objects whose ejecta mass is inferred to be larger than the canonical Chandrasekhar mass. We present and discuss the UV/optical photometric light curves, colors, absolute magnitudes, and spectra of three candidate Super-Chandrasekhar mass SNe--2009dc, 2011aa, and 2012dn--observed with the Swift Ultraviolet/Optical Telescope. The light curves are at the broad end for SNe Ia, with the light curves of SN~2011aa being amongst the broadest ever observed. We find all three to have very blue colors which may provide a means of excluding these overluminous SNe from cosmological analysis, though there is some overlap with the bluest of "normal" SNe Ia. All three are overluminous in their UV absolute magnitudes compared to normal and broad SNe Ia, but SNe 2011aa and 2012dn are not optically overluminous compared to normal SNe Ia. The integrated luminosity curves of SNe 2011aa and 2012dn in the UVOT range (1600-6000 Angstroms) are only half as bright as SN~2009dc, implying a smaller 56Ni yield. While not enough to strongly affect the bolometric flux, the early time mid-UV flux makes a significant contribution at early times. The strong spectral features in the mid-UV spectra of SNe 2009dc and 2012dn suggest a higher temperature and lower opacity to be the cause of the UV excess rather than a hot, smooth blackbody from shock interaction. Further work is needed to determine the ejecta and 56Ni masses of SNe 2011aa and 2012dn and fully explain their high UV luminosities.
  • Ptolemy's model of the Moon's motion implied that its distance varies by nearly a factor of two, implying that its angular size should also vary by nearly a factor of two. We present an analysis of 100 naked eye observations of the Moon's angular size obtained over 1145 days, showing regular variations of at least 3 arc minutes. Thus, ancient astronomers could have shown that a key implication of Ptolemy's model was wrong. In modern times we attribute the variation of distance of the Moon to the combined effect of the ellipticity of the Moon's orbit and the perturbing effect of the Sun on the Earth-Moon system. We show graphically how this affects the ecliptic longitudes and radial distance of the Moon. The longitude and distance "anomalies" are correlated with the Moon's phase. This is illustrated without any complex equations or geometry.
  • This is the first release of optical spectroscopic data of low-redshift Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) by the Carnegie Supernova Project including 604 previously unpublished spectra of 93 SNe Ia. The observations cover a range of phases from 12 days before to over 150 days after the time of B-band maximum light. With the addition of 228 near-maximum spectra from the literature we study the diversity among SNe Ia in a quantitative manner. For that purpose, spectroscopic parameters are employed such as expansion velocities from spectral line blueshifts, and pseudo-equivalent widths (pW). The values of those parameters at maximum light are obtained for 78 objects, thus providing a characterization of SNe Ia that may help to improve our understanding of the properties of the exploding systems and the thermonuclear flame propagation. Two objects, namely SNe 2005M and 2006is, stand out from the sample by showing peculiar Si II and S II velocities but otherwise standard velocities for the rest of the ions. We further study the correlations between spectroscopic and photometric parameters such as light-curve decline rate and color. In agreement with previous studies, we find that the pW of Si II absorption features are very good indicators of light-curve decline rate. Furthermore, we demonstrate that parameters such as pW2(SiII4130) and pW6(SiII5972) provide precise calibrations of the peak B-band luminosity with dispersions of ~0.15 mag. In the search for a secondary parameter in the calibration of peak luminosity for SNe Ia, we find a ~2--3-sigma correlation between B-band Hubble residuals and the velocity at maximum light of S II and Si II lines.
  • We present previously unpublished photometry of supernovae 2003gs and 2003hv. Using spectroscopically-derived corrections to the U-band photometry, we reconcile U-band light curves made from imagery with the Cerro Tololo 0.9-m, 1.3-m and Las Campanas 1-m telescopes. Previously, such light curves showed a 0.4 mag spread at one month after maximum light. This gives us hope that a set of corrected ultraviolet light curves of nearby objects can contribute to the full utilization of rest frame U-band data of supernovae at redshift ~0.3 to 0.8. As pointed out recently by Kessler et al. in the context of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey supernova search, if we take the published U-band photometry of nearby Type Ia supernovae at face value, there is a 0.12 mag U-band anomaly in the distance moduli of higher redshift objects. This anomaly led the Sloan survey to eliminate from their analyses all photometry obtained in the rest frame U-band. The Supernova Legacy Survey eliminated observer frame U-band photometry, which is to say nearby objects observed in the U-band, but they used photometry of high redshift objects no matter in which band the photons were emitted.
  • We review some results of the past 12 years derived from optical and infrared photometry of Type Ia supernovae. A combination of optical and infrared photometry allows us to determine accurately the extinction along the line of sight. The resulting distance measurements are much more accurate than can be obtained from optical data alone. Type Ia supernovae are very nearly standard candles in the near-infrared. Accurate supernova distances, coupled with other observational data available at present, allow us to determine the matter density in the universe and lead to evidence for the existence of Dark Energy. We can now address some questions on the grandest scale such as, "What is the ultimate Fate of the universe?"
  • Xiaofeng Wang, Lifan Wang, Alexei V. Filippenko, Eddie Baron, Markus Kromer, Dennis Jack, Tianmeng Zhang, Greg Aldering, Pierre Antilogus, David Arnett, Dietrich Baade, Brian J. Barris, Stefano Benetti, Patrice Bouchet, Adam S. Burrows, Ramon Canal, Enrico Cappellaro, Raymond Carlberg, Elisa di Carlo, Peter Challis, Arlin Crotts, John I. Danziger, Massimo Della Valle, Michael Fink, Ryan J. Foley, Claes Fransson, Avishay Gal-Yam, Peter Garnavich, Chris L. Gerardy, Gerson Goldhaber, Mario Hamuy, Wolfgang Hillebrandt, Peter A. Hoeflich, Stephen T. Holland, Daniel E. Holz, John P. Hughes, David J. Jeffery, Saurabh W. Jha, Dan Kasen, Alexei M. Khokhlov, Robert P. Kirshner, Robert Knop, Cecilia Kozma, Kevin Krisciunas, Brian C. Lee, Bruno Leibundgut, Eric J. Lentz, Douglas C. Leonard, Walter H. G. Lewin, Weidong Li, Mario Livio, Peter Lundqvist, Dan Maoz, Thomas Matheson, Paolo Mazzali, Peter Meikle, Gajus Miknaitis, Peter Milne, Stefan Mochnacki, Ken'Ichi Nomoto, Peter E. Nugent, Elaine Oran, Nino Panagia, Saul Perlmutter, Mark M. Phillips, Philip Pinto, Dovi Poznanski, Christopher J. Pritchet, Martin Reinecke, Adam Riess, Pilar Ruiz-Lapuente, Richard Scalzo, Eric M. Schlegel, Brian Schmidt, James Siegrist, Alicia M. Soderberg, Jesper Sollerman, George Sonneborn, Anthony Spadafora, Jason Spyromilio, Richard A. Sramek, Sumner G. Starrfield, Louis G. Strolger, Nicholas B. Suntzeff, Rollin Thomas, John L. Tonry, Amedeo Tornambe, James W. Truran, Massimo Turatto, Michael Turner, Schuyler D. Van Dyk, Kurt Weiler, J. Craig Wheeler, Michael Wood-Vasey, Stan Woosley, Hitoshi Yamaoka
    Feb. 6, 2012 astro-ph.CO, astro-ph.HE
    We present ultraviolet (UV) spectroscopy and photometry of four Type Ia supernovae (SNe 2004dt, 2004ef, 2005M, and 2005cf) obtained with the UV prism of the Advanced Camera for Surveys on the Hubble Space Telescope. This dataset provides unique spectral time series down to 2000 Angstrom. Significant diversity is seen in the near maximum-light spectra (~ 2000--3500 Angstrom) for this small sample. The corresponding photometric data, together with archival data from Swift Ultraviolet/Optical Telescope observations, provide further evidence of increased dispersion in the UV emission with respect to the optical. The peak luminosities measured in uvw1/F250W are found to correlate with the B-band light-curve shape parameter dm15(B), but with much larger scatter relative to the correlation in the broad-band B band (e.g., ~0.4 mag versus ~0.2 mag for those with 0.8 < dm15 < 1.7 mag). SN 2004dt is found as an outlier of this correlation (at > 3 sigma), being brighter than normal SNe Ia such as SN 2005cf by ~0.9 mag and ~2.0 mag in the uvw1/F250W and uvm2/F220W filters, respectively. We show that different progenitor metallicity or line-expansion velocities alone cannot explain such a large discrepancy. Viewing-angle effects, such as due to an asymmetric explosion, may have a significant influence on the flux emitted in the UV region. Detailed modeling is needed to disentangle and quantify the above effects.
  • We performed an integrated optical polarization survey of 70 nearby galaxies to study the relationship between linear polarization and galaxy properties. To date this is the largest survey of its kind. The data were collected at McDonald Observatory using the Imaging Grism Polarimeter on the Otto Struve 2.1m telescope. Most of the galaxies did not have significant level of linear polarization, where the bulk is <1%. A fraction of the galaxies showed a loose correlation between the polarization and position angle of the galaxy, indicating that dust scattering is the main source of optical polarization. The unbarred spiral galaxies are consistent with the predicted relationship with inclination from scattering models of ~sin^2i.
  • It is straightforward to determine the size of the Earth and the distance to the Moon without making use of a telescope. The methods have been known since the 3rd century BC. However, few amateur or professional astronomers have worked this out from data they themselves have taken. Here we use a gnomon to determine the latitude and longitude of South Bend, Indiana, and College Station, Texas, and determine a value of the radius of the Earth of 6290 km, only 1.4 percent smaller than the true value. We use the method of Aristarchus and the size of the Earth's shadow during the lunar eclipse of 2011 June 15 to derive an estimate of the distance to the Moon (62.3 R_Earth), some 3.3 percent greater than the true mean value. We use measurements of the angular motion of the Moon against the background stars over the course of two nights, using a simple cross staff device, to estimate the Moon's distance at perigee and apogee. Finally, we use simultaneous CCD observations of asteroid 1996 HW1 obtained with small telescopes in Socorro, New Mexico, and Ojai, California, to derive a value of the Astronomical Unit of (1.59 +/- 0.19) X 10^8 km, about 6 percent too large. The data and methods presented here can easily become part of a beginning astronomy lab class.
  • Dome A on the Antarctic plateau is likely one of the best observing sites on Earth thanks to the excellent atmospheric conditions present at the site during the long polar winter night. We present high-cadence time-series aperture photometry of 10,000 stars with i<14.5 mag located in a 23 square-degree region centered on the south celestial pole. The photometry was obtained with one of the CSTAR telescopes during 128 days of the 2008 Antarctic winter. We used this photometric data set to derive site statistics for Dome A and to search for variable stars. Thanks to the nearly-uninterrupted synoptic coverage, we find 6 times as many variables as previous surveys with similar magnitude limits. We detected 157 variable stars, of which 55% are unclassified, 27% are likely binaries and 17% are likely pulsating stars. The latter category includes delta Scuti, gamma Doradus and RR Lyrae variables. One variable may be a transiting exoplanet.
  • We present optical and near-infrared photometry, as well as ground-based optical spectra and Hubble Space Telescope ultraviolet spectra, of the Type Ia supernova (SN) 2001ay. At maximum light the Si II and Mg II lines indicated expansion velocities of 14,000 km/sec, while Si III and S II showed velocities of 9,000 km/sec There is also evidence for some unburned carbon at 12,000 km/sec. SN 2001ay exhibited a decline-rate parameter Delta m_15(B) = 0.68 \pm 0.05 mag; this and the B-band photometry at t > +25 d past maximum make it the most slowly declining Type Ia SN yet discovered. Three of four super-Chandrasekhar-mass candidates have decline rates almost as slow as this. After correction for Galactic and host-galaxy extinction, SN 2001ay had M_B = -19.19 and M_V = -19.17 mag at maximum light; thus, it was not overluminous in optical bands. In near-infrared bands it was overluminous only at the 2-sigma level at most. For a rise time of 18 d (explosion to bolometric maximum) the implied Ni-56 yield was (0.58 \pm 0.15)/alpha M_Sun, with alpha = L_max/E_Ni probably in the range 1.0 to 1.2. The Ni-56 yield is comparable to that of many Type Ia supernovae. The "normal" Ni-56 yield and the typical peak optical brightness suggest that the very broad optical light curve is explained by the trapping of the gamma rays in the inner regions.
  • The giant elliptical galaxy NGC 1316 (Fornax A) is a well-studied member of the Fornax Cluster and a prolific producer of Type Ia supernovae, having hosted four observed events since 1980. Here we present detailed optical and near-infrared light curves of the spectroscopically normal SN 2006dd. These data are used, along with previously published photometry of the normal SN 1980N and SN 1981D, and the fast-declining, low-luminosity SN 2006mr, to compute independent estimates of the host reddening for each supernova, and the distance to NGC 1316. From the three normal supernovae, we find a distance of 17.8 +/- 0.3 (random) +/- 0.3 (systematic) Mpc for Ho = 72. Distance moduli derived from the "EBV" and Tripp methods give values that are mutually consistent to 4 -- 8%. Moreover, the weighted means of the distance moduli for these three SNe for three methods agree to within 3%. This consistency is encouraging and supports the premise that Type Ia supernovae are reliable distance indicators at the 5% precision level or better. On the other hand, the two methods used to estimate the distance of the fast-declining SN 2006mr both yield a distance to NGC 1316 which is 25-30% larger. This disparity casts doubt on the suitability of fast-declining events for estimating extragalactic distances. Modest-to-negligible host galaxy reddening values are derived for all four supernovae. Nevertheless, two of them (SN 2006dd and SN 2006mr) show strong NaID interstellar lines in the host galaxy system. The strength of this absorption is completely inconsistent with the small reddening values derived from the supernova light curves if the gas in NGC 1316 is typical of that found in the interstellar medium of the Milky Way. In addition, the equivalent width of the NaID lines in SN 2006dd appear to have weakened significantly some 100-150 days after explosion.
  • Prior to the invention of the telescope many astronomers worked out theories of the motion of the Moon. The purpose of such theories was to be able to predict the position of the Moon in the sky. These geometrical models implied a certain range of distance of the Moon. Ptolemy's model, in fact, predicted that the Moon was nearly twice as far away at apogee than at perigee. Measurements of the angular size of the Moon were within the capabilities of pre-telescopic astronomers. These could have helped refine the models of the motion of the Moon, but hardly anyone seems to have made any measurements that have come down to us. Using a piece of cardboard with a small hole punched in it which slides up and down a yardstick, we show that it is possible to determine an approximate value of the eccentricity of the Moon's orbit. From 64 observations taken over 14 cycles of the Moon's phases we find find epsilon ~ 0.041 +/- 0.004. A typical measurement uncertainty of the Moon's angular size is +/- 0.7 arcmin. Since the Moon's angular size ranges from 29.4 to 33.5 arcmin, carefully taken naked eye data are accurate enough to demonstrate the periodic variations of the Moon's angular size.
  • On the basis of measurements of the V-band sky brightness obtained at Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory in December 2006 and December 2008 we confirm the functional form of the basic model of Garstang (1989, 1991). At high zenith angles we measure an enhancement of a factor of two over Garstang's later model when there is no marine cloud layer over La Serena/Coquimbo. No corresponding enhancement is found in the B-band.