• Taipan is a multi-object spectroscopic galaxy survey starting in 2017 that will cover 2pi steradians over the southern sky, and obtain optical spectra for about two million galaxies out to z<0.4. Taipan will use the newly-refurbished 1.2m UK Schmidt Telescope at Siding Spring Observatory with the new TAIPAN instrument, which includes an innovative 'Starbugs' positioning system capable of rapidly and simultaneously deploying up to 150 spectroscopic fibres (and up to 300 with a proposed upgrade) over the 6-deg diameter focal plane, and a purpose-built spectrograph operating from 370 to 870nm with resolving power R>2000. The main scientific goals of Taipan are: (i) to measure the distance scale of the Universe (primarily governed by the local expansion rate, H_0) to 1% precision, and the structure growth rate of structure to 5%; (ii) to make the most extensive map yet constructed of the mass distribution and motions in the local Universe, using peculiar velocities based on improved Fundamental Plane distances, which will enable sensitive tests of gravitational physics; and (iii) to deliver a legacy sample of low-redshift galaxies as a unique laboratory for studying galaxy evolution as a function of mass and environment. The final survey, which will be completed within 5 years, will consist of a complete magnitude-limited sample (i<17) of about 1.2x10^6 galaxies, supplemented by an extension to higher redshifts and fainter magnitudes (i<18.1) of a luminous red galaxy sample of about 0.8x10^6 galaxies. Observations and data processing will be carried out remotely and in a fully-automated way, using a purpose-built automated 'virtual observer' software and an automated data reduction pipeline. The Taipan survey is deliberately designed to maximise its legacy value, by complementing and enhancing current and planned surveys of the southern sky at wavelengths from the optical to the radio.
  • We examine the properties of a sample of 35 nearby passive spiral galaxies in order to determine their dominant quenching mechanism(s). All five low mass ($\textrm{M}_{\star} < 1 \times 10^{10} \textrm{M}_{\odot}$) passive spiral galaxies are located in the rich Virgo cluster. This is in contrast to low mass spiral galaxies with star formation, which inhabit a range of environments. We postulate that cluster-scale gas stripping and heating mechanisms operating only in rich clusters are required to quench low mass passive spirals, and ram-pressure stripping and strangulation are obvious candidates. For higher mass passive spirals, while trends are present, the story is less clear. The passive spiral bar fraction is high: 74$\pm$15%, compared with 36$\pm$5% for a mass, redshift, and T-type matched comparison sample of star forming spiral galaxies. The high mass passive spirals occur mostly, but not exclusively, in groups, and can be central or satellite galaxies. The passive spiral group fraction of 74$\pm$15% is similar to that of the comparison sample of star forming galaxies at 61$\pm$7%. We find evidence for both quenching via internal structure and environment in our passive spiral sample, though some galaxies have evidence of neither. From this, we conclude no one mechanism is responsible for quenching star formation in passive spiral galaxies - rather, a mixture of mechanisms are required to produce the passive spiral distribution we see today.
  • We use the energy-balance code MAGPHYS to determine stellar and dust masses, and dust corrected star-formation rates for over 200,000 GAMA galaxies, 170,000 G10-COSMOS galaxies and 200,000 3D-HST galaxies. Our values agree well with previously reported measurements and constitute a representative and homogeneous dataset spanning a broad range in stellar mass (10^8---10^12 Msol), dust mass (10^6---10^9 Msol), and star-formation rates (0.01---100 Msol per yr), and over a broad redshift range (0.0 < z < 5.0). We combine these data to measure the cosmic star-formation history (CSFH), the stellar-mass density (SMD), and the dust-mass density (DMD) over a 12 Gyr timeline. The data mostly agree with previous estimates, where they exist, and provide a quasi-homogeneous dataset using consistent mass and star-formation estimators with consistent underlying assumptions over the full time range. As a consequence our formal errors are significantly reduced when compared to the historic literature. Integrating our cosmic star-formation history we precisely reproduce the stellar-mass density with an ISM replenishment factor of 0.50 +/- 0.07, consistent with our choice of Chabrier IMF plus some modest amount of stripped stellar mass. Exploring the cosmic dust density evolution, we find a gradual increase in dust density with lookback time. We build a simple phenomenological model from the CSFH to account for the dust mass evolution, and infer two key conclusions: (1) For every unit of stellar mass which is formed 0.0065---0.004 units of dust mass is also formed; (2) Over the history of the Universe approximately 90 to 95 per cent of all dust formed has been destroyed and/or ejected.
  • Observations with the Chandra X-ray Observatory are used to examine the hot gas properties within a sample of 10 galaxy groups selected from the Galaxy And Mass Assembly survey's optical Friends-of-Friends group catalogue. Our groups have been screened to eliminate spurious and unrelaxed systems, and the effectiveness of this procedure is demonstrated by the detection of intergalactic hot gas in 80 per cent of our sample. However, we find that 9 of the 10 are X-ray underluminous by a mean factor of $\sim$4 compared to typical X-ray-selected samples. Consistent with this, the majority of our groups have gas fractions that are lower and gas entropies somewhat higher than those seen in typical X-ray-selected samples. Two groups, which have high 2{\sigma} lower limits on their gas entropy, are candidates for the population of high-entropy groups predicted by some active galactic nucleus feedback models.
  • We present a pilot analysis of the influence of galaxy stellar mass and cluster environment on the probability of slow rotation in 22 central galaxies at mean redshift $z=0.07$. This includes new integral-field observations of 5 central galaxies selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, observed with the SPIRAL integral-field spectrograph on the Anglo-Australian Telescope. The composite sample presented here spans a wide range of stellar masses, $10.9<$log(M$_{*}/$M$_{\odot})<12.0$, and are embedded in halos ranging from groups to clusters, $12.9<$log(M$_{200}/$M$_{\odot})<15.6$. We find a mean probability of slow rotation in our sample of P(SR)$=54\pm7$percent. Our results show an increasing probability of slow rotation in central galaxies with increasing stellar mass. However, when we examine the dependence of slow rotation on host cluster halo mass we do not see a significant relationship. We also explore the influence of cluster dominance on slow rotation in central galaxies. Clusters with low dominance are associated with dynamically younger systems. We find that cluster dominance has no significant effect on the probability of slow rotation in central galaxies. These results conflict with a paradigm in which halo mass alone predetermines central galaxy properties.
  • We present radio Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) luminosity functions over the redshift range 0.005 < z < 0.75. The sample from which the luminosity functions are constructed is an optical spectroscopic survey of radio galaxies, identified from matched Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty-cm survey (FIRST) sources and Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) images.The radio AGN are separated into Low Excitation Radio Galaxies (LERGs) and High Excitation Radio Galaxies (HERGs) using the optical spectra. We derive radio luminosity functions for LERGs and HERGs separately in the three redshift bins (0.005 < z < 0.3, 0.3 < z < 0.5 and 0.5 < z <0.75). The radio luminosity functions can be well described by a double power-law. Assuming this double power-law shape the LERG population displays little or no evolution over this redshift range evolving as ~$(1+z)^{0.06}$ assuming pure density evolution or ~ $(1+z)^{0.46}$ assuming pure luminosity evolution. In contrast, the HERG population evolves more rapidly, best fitted by ~$(1+z)^{2.93}$ assuming a double power-law shape and pure density evolution. If a pure luminosity model is assumed the best fitting HERG evolution is parameterised by ~$(1+z)^{7.41}$. The characteristic break in the radio luminosity function occurs at a significantly higher power (~1 dex) for the HERG population in comparison to the LERGs. This is consistent with the two populations representing fundamentally different accretion modes.
  • We place the most robust constraint to date on the scale of the turnover in the cosmological matter power spectrum using data from the WiggleZ Dark Energy Survey. We find this feature to lie at a scale of $k_0=0.0160^{+0.0041}_{-0.0035}$ [h/Mpc] (68% confidence) for an effective redshift of 0.62 and obtain from this the first-ever turnover-derived distance and cosmology constraints: a measure of the cosmic distance-redshift relation in units of the horizon scale at the redshift of radiation-matter equality (r_H) of D_V(z=0.62)/r_H=18.3 (+6.3/-3.3) and, assuming a prior on the number of extra relativistic degrees of freedom $N_{eff}=3$, constraints on the matter density parameter $\Omega_Mh^2=0.136^{+0.026}_{-0.052}$ and on the redshift of matter-radiation equality $z_{eq}=3274^{+631}_{-1260}$. All results are in excellent agreement with the predictions of standard LCDM models. Our constraints on the logarithmic slope of the power spectrum on scales larger than the turnover is bounded in the lower limit with values only as low as -1 allowed, with the prediction of standard LCDM models easily accommodated by our results. Lastly, we generate forecasts for the achievable precision of future surveys at constraining $k_0$, $\Omega_Mh^2$, $z_{eq}$ and $N_{eff}$. We find that BOSS should substantially improve upon the WiggleZ turnover constraint, reaching a precision on $k_0$ of $\pm$9% (68% confidence), translating to precisions on $\Omega_Mh^2$ and $z_{eq}$ of $\pm$10% (assuming a prior $N_{eff}=3$) and on $N_{eff}$ of (+78/-56)% (assuming a prior $\Omega_Mh^2=0.135$). This is sufficient precision to sharpen the constraints on $N_{eff}$ from WMAP, particularly in its upper limit. For Euclid, we find corresponding attainable precisions on $(k_0, \Omega_Mh^2, N_eff)$ of (3,4,+17/-21)%. This represents a precision approaching our forecasts for the Planck Surveyor.
  • We describe an accurate new method for determining absolute magnitudes, and hence also K-corrections, which is simpler than most previous methods, being based on a quadratic function of just one suitably chosen observed color. The method relies on the extensive and accurate new set of 129 empirical galaxy template SEDs from Brown et al. (2014). A key advantage of our method is that we can reliably estimate random errors in computed absolute magnitudes due to galaxy diversity, photometric error and redshift error. We derive K-corrections for the five Sloan Digital Sky Survey filters and provide parameter tables for use by the astronomical community. Using the New York Value-Added Galaxy Catalog we compare our K-corrections with those from kcorrect. Our K-corrections produce absolute magnitudes that are generally in good agreement with kcorrect. Absolute g, r, i, z-band magnitudes differ by less than 0.02 mag, and those in the u-band by ~0.04 mag. The evolution of rest-frame colors as a function of redshift is better behaved using our method, with relatively few galaxies being assigned anomalously red colors and a tight red sequence being observed across the whole 0.0 < z < 0.5 redshift range.
  • We present significant improvements in cosmic distance measurements from the WiggleZ Dark Energy Survey, achieved by applying the reconstruction of the baryonic acoustic feature technique. We show using both data and simulations that the reconstruction technique can often be effective despite patchiness of the survey, significant edge effects and shot-noise. We investigate three redshift bins in the redshift range 0.2<$z$<1, and in all three find improvement after reconstruction in the detection of the baryonic acoustic feature and its usage as a standard ruler. We measure model independent distance measures $D_{\mathrm V}(r_{\mathrm s}^\mathrm{fid}/r_{\mathrm s})$ of 1716 $\pm$ 83 Mpc, 2221 $\pm$ 101 Mpc, 2516 $\pm$ 86 Mpc (68% CL) at effective redshifts z = 0.44, 0.6, 0.73, respectively, where $D_{\mathrm V}$ is the volume-average-distance, and $r_{\mathrm s}$ is the sound horizon at the end of the baryon drag epoch. These significantly improved 4.8, 4.5 and 3.4 percent accuracy measurements are equivalent to those expected from surveys with up to 2.5 times the volume of WiggleZ. These measurements are fully consistent with cosmologies allowed by the analyses of the Planck Collaboration and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey.We provide the $D_{\mathrm V}(r_{\mathrm s}^\mathrm{fid}/r_{\mathrm s})$ posterior probability distributions and their covariances. When combining these measurements with temperature fluctuations measurements of Planck, the polarization of WMAP9, and the 6dF Galaxy Survey baryonic acoustic feature, we do not detect deviations from a flat LCDM model. Assuming this model we constrain the current expansion rate to $H_0$ = 67.15 $\pm$ 0.98 kms$^{-1}$Mpc$^{-1}$. Allowing the equation of state of dark energy to vary we obtain $w_\mathrm{DE}$ = -1.080 $\pm$ 0.135. When assuming a curved LCDM model we obtain a curvature value of $\Omega_{\mathrm K}$ = -0.0043 $\pm$ 0.0047.
  • Based on data from the Galaxy and Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey, we report on the discovery of structures that we refer to as `tendrils' of galaxies: coherent, thin chains of galaxies that are rooted in filaments and terminate in neighbouring filaments or voids. On average, tendrils contain 6 galaxies and span 10 $h^{-1}$ Mpc. We use the so-called line correlation function to prove that tendrils represent real structures rather than accidental alignments. We show that voids found in the SDSS-DR7 survey that overlap with GAMA regions contain a large number of galaxies, primarily belonging to tendrils. This implies that void sizes are strongly dependent on the number density and sensitivity limits of a survey. We caution that galaxies in low density regions, that may be defined as `void galaxies,' will have local galaxy number densities that depend on such observational limits and are likely higher than can be directly measured.
  • From a volume limited sample of 45,542 galaxies and 6,000 groups with $z \leq 0.213$ we use an adapted minimal spanning tree algorithm to identify and classify large scale structures within the Galaxy and Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey. Using galaxy groups, we identify 643 filaments across the three equatorial GAMA fields that span up to 200 $h^{-1}$ Mpc in length, each with an average of 8 groups within them. By analysing galaxies not belonging to groups we identify a secondary population of smaller coherent structures composed entirely of galaxies, dubbed `tendrils' that appear to link filaments together, or penetrate into voids, generally measuring around 10 $h^{-1}$ Mpc in length and containing on average 6 galaxies. Finally we are also able to identify a population of isolated void galaxies. By running this algorithm on GAMA mock galaxy catalogues we compare the characteristics of large scale structure between observed and mock data; finding that mock filaments reproduce observed ones extremely well. This provides a probe of higher order distribution statistics not captured by the popularly used two-point correlation function.
  • We present the ultraviolet (UV) luminosity function of galaxies from the GALEX Medium Imaging Survey with measured spectroscopic redshifts from the first data release of the WiggleZ Dark Energy Survey. This sample selects galaxies with high star formation rates: at 0.6 < z < 0.9 the median star formation rate is at the upper 95th percentile of optically-selected (r<22.5) galaxies and the sample contains about 50 per cent of all NUV < 22.8, 0.6 < z < 0.9 starburst galaxies within the volume sampled. The most luminous galaxies in our sample (-21.0>M_NUV>-22.5) evolve very rapidly with a number density declining as (1+z)^{5\pm 1} from redshift z = 0.9 to z = 0.6. These starburst galaxies (M_NUV<-21 is approximately a star formation rate of 30 \msuny) contribute about 1 per cent of cosmic star formation over the redshift range z=0.6 to z=0.9. The star formation rate density of these very luminous galaxies evolves rapidly, as (1+z)^{4\pm 1}. Such a rapid evolution implies the majority of star formation in these large galaxies must have occurred before z = 0.9. We measure the UV luminosity function in 0.05 redshift intervals spanning 0.1<z<0.9, and provide analytic fits to the results. At all redshifts greater than z=0.55 we find that the bright end of the luminosity function is not well described by a pure Schechter function due to an excess of very luminous (M_NUV<-22) galaxies. These luminosity functions can be used to create a radial selection function for the WiggleZ survey or test models of galaxy formation and evolution. Here we test the AGN feedback model in Scannapieco et al. (2005), and find that this AGN feedback model requires AGN feedback efficiency to vary with one or more of the following: stellar mass, star formation rate and redshift.
  • Higher-order statistics are a useful and complementary tool for measuring the clustering of galaxies, containing information on the non-gaussian evolution and morphology of large-scale structure in the Universe. In this work we present measurements of the three-point correlation function (3PCF) for 187,000 galaxies in the WiggleZ spectroscopic galaxy survey. We explore the WiggleZ 3PCF scale and shape dependence at three different epochs z=0.35, 0.55 and 0.68, the highest redshifts where these measurements have been made to date. Using N-body simulations to predict the clustering of dark matter, we constrain the linear and non-linear bias parameters of WiggleZ galaxies with respect to dark matter, and marginalise over them to obtain constraints on sigma_8(z), the variance of perturbations on a scale of 8 Mpc/h and its evolution with redshift. These measurements of sigma_8(z), which have 10-20% accuracies, are consistent with the predictions of the LCDM concordance cosmology and test this model in a new way.
  • The growth history of large-scale structure in the Universe is a powerful probe of the cosmological model, including the nature of dark energy. We study the growth rate of cosmic structure to redshift $z = 0.9$ using more than $162{,}000$ galaxy redshifts from the WiggleZ Dark Energy Survey. We divide the data into four redshift slices with effective redshifts $z = [0.2,0.4,0.6,0.76]$ and in each of the samples measure and model the 2-point galaxy correlation function in parallel and transverse directions to the line-of-sight. After simultaneously fitting for the galaxy bias factor we recover values for the cosmic growth rate which are consistent with our assumed $\Lambda$CDM input cosmological model, with an accuracy of around 20% in each redshift slice. We investigate the sensitivity of our results to the details of the assumed model and the range of physical scales fitted, making close comparison with a set of N-body simulations for calibration. Our measurements are consistent with an independent power-spectrum analysis of a similar dataset, demonstrating that the results are not driven by systematic errors. We determine the pairwise velocity dispersion of the sample in a non-parametric manner, showing that it systematically increases with decreasing redshift, and investigate the Alcock-Paczynski effects of changing the assumed fiducial model on the results. Our techniques should prove useful for current and future galaxy surveys mapping the growth rate of structure using the 2-dimensional correlation function.
  • We characterise the stellar masses and star formation rates in a sample of almost 40000 spectroscopically confirmed UV luminous galaxies at 0.3<z<1.0 selected from within the WiggleZ Dark Energy Survey. In particular, we match this UV bright population to wide-field infrared surveys such as the near infrared UKIDSS LAS and the mid infrared WISE All-Sky Survey. We find that ~30% of the UV luminous WiggleZ galaxies are detected at >5sigma in the UKIDSS-LAS at all redshifts. An even more luminous subset of 15% are also detected in the WISE 3.4 and 4.6um bands. We compute stellar masses for this very large sample of extremely blue galaxies and quantify the sensitivity of the stellar mass estimates to various assumptions made during the SED fitting. The median stellar masses are log10(M*/M0)=9.6\pm0.7, 10.2\pm0.5 and 10.4\pm0.4 for the IR-undetected, UKIDSS detected and UKIDSS+WISE detected galaxies respectively. We demonstrate that the inclusion of NIR photometry can lead to tighter constraints on the stellar masses. The mass estimates are found to be most sensitive to the inclusion of secondary bursts of star formation as well as changes in the stellar population synthesis models, both of which can lead to median discrepancies of the order of 0.3dex in the stellar masses. We find that the best-fit M/LK is significantly lower (by ~0.4 dex) than that predicted by simple optical colour based estimators, in particular for the bluer galaxies with younger best-fit ages. The WiggleZ galaxies have star formation rates of 3-10 M0/yr and mostly lie at the upper end of the main sequence of star-forming galaxies at these redshifts. Their rest-frame UV luminosities and stellar masses are comparable to both local compact UV-luminous galaxies as well as Lyman break galaxies at z~2-3.(abridged)
  • This paper presents cosmological results from the final data release of the WiggleZ Dark Energy Survey. We perform full analyses of different cosmological models using the WiggleZ power spectra measured at z=0.22, 0.41, 0.60, and 0.78, combined with other cosmological datasets. The limiting factor in this analysis is the theoretical modelling of the galaxy power spectrum, including non-linearities, galaxy bias, and redshift-space distortions. In this paper we assess several different methods for modelling the theoretical power spectrum, testing them against the Gigaparsec WiggleZ simulations (GiggleZ). We fit for a base set of 6 cosmological parameters, {Omega_b h^2, Omega_CDM h^2, H_0, tau, A_s, n_s}, and 5 supplementary parameters {n_run, r, w, Omega_k, sum m_nu}. In combination with the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB), our results are consistent with the LambdaCDM concordance cosmology, with a measurement of the matter density of Omega_m =0.29 +/- 0.016 and amplitude of fluctuations sigma_8 = 0.825 +/- 0.017. Using WiggleZ data with CMB and other distance and matter power spectra data, we find no evidence for any of the extension parameters being inconsistent with their LambdaCDM model values. The power spectra data and theoretical modelling tools are available for use as a module for CosmoMC, which we here make publicly available at http://smp.uq.edu.au/wigglez-data . We also release the data and random catalogues used to construct the baryon acoustic oscillation correlation function.
  • We have made the largest-volume measurement to date of the transition to large-scale homogeneity in the distribution of galaxies. We use the WiggleZ survey, a spectroscopic survey of over 200,000 blue galaxies in a cosmic volume of ~1 (Gpc/h)^3. A new method of defining the 'homogeneity scale' is presented, which is more robust than methods previously used in the literature, and which can be easily compared between different surveys. Due to the large cosmic depth of WiggleZ (up to z=1) we are able to make the first measurement of the transition to homogeneity over a range of cosmic epochs. The mean number of galaxies N(<r) in spheres of comoving radius r is proportional to r^3 within 1%, or equivalently the fractal dimension of the sample is within 1% of D_2=3, at radii larger than 71 \pm 8 Mpc/h at z~0.2, 70 \pm 5 Mpc/h at z~0.4, 81 \pm 5 Mpc/h at z~0.6, and 75 \pm 4 Mpc/h at z~0.8. We demonstrate the robustness of our results against selection function effects, using a LCDM N-body simulation and a suite of inhomogeneous fractal distributions. The results are in excellent agreement with both the LCDM N-body simulation and an analytical LCDM prediction. We can exclude a fractal distribution with fractal dimension below D_2=2.97 on scales from ~80 Mpc/h up to the largest scales probed by our measurement, ~300 Mpc/h, at 99.99% confidence.
  • We perform a joint determination of the distance-redshift relation and cosmic expansion rate at redshifts z = 0.44, 0.6 and 0.73 by combining measurements of the baryon acoustic peak and Alcock-Paczynski distortion from galaxy clustering in the WiggleZ Dark Energy Survey, using a large ensemble of mock catalogues to calculate the covariance between the measurements. We find that D_A(z) = (1205 +/- 114, 1380 +/- 95, 1534 +/- 107) Mpc and H(z) = (82.6 +/- 7.8, 87.9 +/- 6.1, 97.3 +/- 7.0) km/s/Mpc at these three redshifts. Further combining our results with other baryon acoustic oscillation and distant supernovae datasets, we use a Monte Carlo Markov Chain technique to determine the evolution of the Hubble parameter H(z) as a stepwise function in 9 redshift bins of width dz = 0.1, also marginalizing over the spatial curvature. Our measurements of H(z), which have precision better than 7% in most redshift bins, are consistent with the expansion history predicted by a cosmological-constant dark-energy model, in which the expansion rate accelerates at redshift z < 0.7.
  • The absolute neutrino mass scale is currently unknown, but can be constrained from cosmology. The WiggleZ high redshift star-forming blue galaxy sample is less sensitive to systematics from non-linear structure formation, redshift-space distortions and galaxy bias than previous surveys. We obtain a upper limit on the sum of neutrino masses of 0.60eV (95% confidence) for WiggleZ+Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe. Combining with priors on the Hubble Parameter and the baryon acoustic oscillation scale gives an upper limit of 0.29eV, which is the strongest neutrino mass constraint derived from spectroscopic galaxy redshift surveys.
  • We have generated complementary halo mass estimates for all groups in the Galaxy And Mass Assembly Galaxy Group Catalogue (GAMA G3Cv1) using a modified caustic mass estimation algorithm, originally developed by Diaferio & Geller (1997). We calibrate the algorithm by applying it on a series of 9 GAMA mock galaxy light cones and investigate the effects of using different definitions for group centre and size. We select the set of parameters that provide median-unbiased mass estimates when tested on mocks, and generate mass estimates for the real group catalogue. We find that on average, the caustic mass estimates agree with dynamical mass estimates within a factor of 2 in 90.8 +/- 6.1% groups and compares equally well to velocity dispersion based mass estimates for both high and low multiplicity groups over the full range of masses probed by the G3Cv1.
  • We study the evolution of galaxy populations around the spectroscopic WiggleZ sample of starforming galaxies at 0.25 < z < 0.75 using the photometric catalog from the Second Red-Sequence Cluster Survey (RCS2). We probe the optical photometric properties of the net excess neighbor galaxies. The key concept is that the marker galaxies and their neighbors are located at the same redshift, providing a sample of galaxies representing a complete census of galaxies in the neighborhood of star-forming galaxies. The results are compared with those using the RCS WiggleZ Spare-Fibre (RCS-WSF) sample as markers, representing galaxies in cluster environments at 0.25 < z < 0.45. By analyzing the stacked color-color properties of the WiggleZ neighbor galaxies, we find that their optical colors are not a strong function of indicators of star-forming activities such as EW([OII]) or GALEX NUV luminoisty of the markers. The galaxies around the WiggleZ markers exhibit a bimodal distribution on the color-magnitude diagram, with most of them located in the blue cloud. The optical galaxy luminosity functions (GLF) of the blue neighbor galaxies have a faint-end slope \alpha of \sim -1.3, similar to that for galaxies in cluster environments drawn from the RCS-WSF sample. The faint-end slope of the GLF for the red neighbors, however, is \sim -0.4, significantly shallower than the \sim -0.7 found for those in cluster environments. This suggests that the build-up of the faint-end of the red sequence in cluster environments is in a significantly more advanced stage than that in the star-forming and lower galaxy density WiggleZ neighborhoods. We find that the red galaxy fraction (fred) around the star-forming WiggleZ galaxies has similar values from z \sim 0.3 to z \sim 0.6 with fred \sim 0.28, but drops to fred \sim 0.20 at z > \sim0.7. This change of fred with redshift suggests that (and more...)
  • We present measurements of the baryon acoustic peak at redshifts z = 0.44, 0.6 and 0.73 in the galaxy correlation function of the final dataset of the WiggleZ Dark Energy Survey. We combine our correlation function with lower-redshift measurements from the 6-degree Field Galaxy Survey and Sloan Digital Sky Survey, producing a stacked survey correlation function in which the statistical significance of the detection of the baryon acoustic peak is 4.9-sigma relative to a zero-baryon model with no peak. We fit cosmological models to this combined baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) dataset comprising six distance-redshift data points, and compare the results to similar fits to the latest compilation of supernovae (SNe) and Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) data. The BAO and SNe datasets produce consistent measurements of the equation-of-state w of dark energy, when separately combined with the CMB, providing a powerful check for systematic errors in either of these distance probes. Combining all datasets we determine w = -1.03 +/- 0.08 for a flat Universe, consistent with a cosmological constant model. Assuming dark energy is a cosmological constant and varying the spatial curvature, we find Omega_k = -0.004 +/- 0.006.
  • Astronomical observations suggest that today's Universe is dominated by a dark energy of unknown physical origin. One of the most notable consequences in many models is that dark energy should cause the expansion of the Universe to accelerate: but the expansion rate as a function of time has proven very difficult to measure directly. We present a new determination of the cosmic expansion history by combining distant supernovae observations with a geometrical analysis of large-scale galaxy clustering within the WiggleZ Dark Energy Survey, using the Alcock-Paczynski test to measure the distortion of standard spheres. Our result constitutes a robust and non-parametric measurement of the Hubble expansion rate as a function of time, which we measure with 10-15% precision in four bins within the redshift range 0.1 < z < 0.9. We demonstrate that the cosmic expansion is accelerating, in a manner independent of the parameterization of the cosmological model (although assuming cosmic homogeneity in our data analysis). Furthermore, we find that this expansion history is consistent with a cosmological-constant dark energy.
  • We report evidence of ordered orbital motion in luminous star-forming galaxies at z~1.3. We present integral field spectroscopy (IFS) observations, performed with the OH Suppressing InfraRed Imaging Spectrograph (OSIRIS) system, assisted by laser guide star adaptive optics on the Keck telescope, of 13 star-forming galaxies selected from the WiggleZ Dark Energy Survey. Selected via ultraviolet and [OII] emission, the large volume of the WiggleZ survey allows the selection of sources which have comparable intrinsic luminosity and stellar mass to IFS samples at z>2. Multiple 1-2 kpc size sub-components of emission, or 'clumps', are detected within the Halpha spatial emission which extends over 6-10 kpc in 4 galaxies, resolved compact emission (r<3 kpc) is detected in 5 galaxies, and extended regions of Halpha emission are observed in the remaining 4 galaxies. We discuss these data in the context of different snapshots in a merger sequence and/or the evolutionary stages of coalescence of star-forming regions in an unstable disk. We find evidence of ordered orbital motion in galaxies as expected from disk models and the highest values of velocity dispersion (\sigma>100 km/s) in the most compact sources. This unique data set reveals that the most luminous star-forming galaxies at z>1 are gaseous unstable disks indicating that a different mode of star formation could be feeding gas to galaxies at z>1, and lending support to theories of cold dense gas flows from the intergalactic medium.
  • We measure the imprint of baryon acoustic oscillations (BAOs) in the galaxy clustering pattern at the highest redshift achieved to date, z=0.6, using the distribution of N=132,509 emission-line galaxies in the WiggleZ Dark Energy Survey. We quantify BAOs using three statistics: the galaxy correlation function, power spectrum and the band-filtered estimator introduced by Xu et al. (2010). The results are mutually consistent, corresponding to a 4.0% measurement of the cosmic distance-redshift relation at z=0.6 (in terms of the acoustic parameter "A(z)" introduced by Eisenstein et al. (2005) we find A(z=0.6) = 0.452 +/- 0.018). Both BAOs and power spectrum shape information contribute toward these constraints. The statistical significance of the detection of the acoustic peak in the correlation function, relative to a wiggle-free model, is 3.2-sigma. The ratios of our distance measurements to those obtained using BAOs in the distribution of Luminous Red Galaxies at redshifts z=0.2 and z=0.35 are consistent with a flat Lambda Cold Dark Matter model that also provides a good fit to the pattern of observed fluctuations in the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) radiation. The addition of the current WiggleZ data results in a ~ 30% improvement in the measurement accuracy of a constant equation-of-state, w, using BAO data alone. Based solely on geometric BAO distance ratios, accelerating expansion (w < -1/3) is required with a probability of 99.8%, providing a consistency check of conclusions based on supernovae observations. Further improvements in cosmological constraints will result when the WiggleZ Survey dataset is complete.