• At 60 pc, TW Hydra (TW Hya) is the closest example of a star with a gas-rich protoplanetary disk, though TW Hya may be relatively old (3-15 Myr). As such, TW Hya is especially appealing to test our understanding of the interplay between stellar and disk evolution. We present a high-resolution near-infrared spectrum of TW Hya obtained with the Immersion GRating INfrared Spectrometer (IGRINS) to re-evaluate the stellar parameters of TW Hya. We compare these data to synthetic spectra of magnetic stars produced by MoogStokes, and use sensitive spectral line profiles to probe the effective temperature, surface gravity, and magnetic field. A model with T_eff= 3800 K, log g=4.2, and B=3.0 kG best fits the near-infrared spectrum of TW Hya. These results correspond to a spectral type of M0.5 and an age of 8 Myr, which is well past the median life of gaseous disks.
  • Planets in young clusters are powerful probes of the evolution of planetary systems. Here we report the discovery of three planets transiting EPIC 247589423, a late K dwarf in the Hyades (~800 Myr) cluster, and robust detection limits for additional planets in the system. The planets were identified from their K2 light curves, as part of our survey of young clusters and star forming regions. The smallest planet has a radius comparable to Earth (0.99+/-0.05 Earth radii), making it one of the few Earth-sized planets with a known, young age. The two larger planets are likely a mini-Neptune and a super-Earth, with radii of 2.91+/-0.11 and 1.45+/-0.10 Earth radii, respectively. The predicted radial velocity signals from these planets are between 0.4 and 2 m/s, achievable with modern precision RV spectrographs. Because the target star is bright (V=11.2) and has relatively low-amplitude stellar variability for a young star (2-6 mmag), EPIC 247589423 hosts the best planets known in a young open cluster for precise radial velocity follow-up, enabling a robust test of earlier claims that young planets are less dense than their older counterparts.
  • We present analysis of near-infrared, high-resolution spectroscopy towards the Flat-spectrum YSO (Young Stellar Object) ESO H$\alpha$ 279a (1.5 solar mass) in the Serpens star forming region, at the distance of 429 pc. Using the Immersion GRating INfrared Spectrometer (IGRINS, R=45,000), we detect emission lines originating from the accretion channel flow, jet, and inner disk. Specifically, we identify hydrogen Brackett series recombination, [Fe II], [Fe III], [Fe IV], Ca I, Na I, H2, H2O and CO overtone emission lines. By modeling five bands of CO overtone emission lines, and the symmetric double-peaked line profile for Na I emission lines, we find that ESO H$\alpha$ 279a has an actively accreting Keplerian disk. From our Keplerian disk model, we find that Na I emission lines originate between 0.04 AU and 1.00 AU, while CO overtone emission lines are from the outer part of disk, in the range between 0.22 AU and 3.00 AU. It reveals that the neutral atomic Na gas is a good tracer of the innermost region of the actively accreting disk. We derive a mass accretion rate of 2-10x10^{-7} M_solar/yr from the measured Br_gamma emission luminosity of 1.78(+-0.31)x10^{31} erg/s.
  • We present a deep near-infrared spectrum of the Orion Bar Photodissociation Region (PDR) taken with the Immersion Grating INfrared Spectrometer (IGRINS) on the 2.7 m telescope at the McDonald Observatory. IGRINS has high spectral resolution (R~45000) and instantaneous broad wavelength coverage (1.45-2.45 microns), enabling us to detect 87 emission lines from rovibrationally excited molecular hydrogen (H_2) that arise from transitions out of 69 upper rovibration levels of the electronic ground state. These levels cover a large range of rotational and vibrational quantum numbers and excitation energies, making them an excellent probe of the excitation mechanisms of H_2 and physical conditions within the PDR. The Orion Bar PDR is thought to consist of cooler high density clumps or filaments (T=50-250 K, n_H = 10^5 - 10^7 cm^-3) embedded in a warmer lower density medium (T=250-1000 K, n_H=10^4 - 10^5 cm^-3). We fit a grid of simple constant-temperature and constant-density Cloudy models, which recreate the observed H_2 level populations well, to constrain the temperature to a range of 600 to 650 K and the density to n_H = 2.5 x 10^3 to 10^4 cm^-3. The best fit model gives T = 625 K and n_H = 5x10^3 cm^-3. This well constrained warm temperature is consistent with kinetic temperatures found by other studies for the Orion Bar's lower density medium. However, the range of densities well fit by the model grid is marginally lower than those reported by other studies. We could be observing lower density gas than the surrounding medium, or perhaps a density-sensitive parameter in our models is not properly estimated.
  • Open clusters and young stellar associations are attractive sites to search for planets and to test theories of planet formation, migration, and evolution. We present our search for, and characterization of, transiting planets in the ~800 Myr old Praesepe (Beehive, M44) Cluster from K2 light curves. We identify seven planet candidates, six of which we statistically validate to be real planets, the last of which requires more data. For each host star we obtain high-resolution NIR spectra to measure its projected rotational broadening and radial velocity, the latter of which we use to confirm cluster membership. We combine low-resolution spectra with the known cluster distance and metallicity to provide precise temperatures, masses, radii, and luminosities for the host stars. Combining our measurements of rotational broadening, rotation periods, and our derived stellar radii, we show that all planetary orbits are consistent with alignment to their host star's rotation. We fit the K2 light curves, including priors on stellar density to put constraints on the planetary eccentricities, all of which are consistent with zero. The difference between the number of planets found in Praesepe and Hyades (8 planets) and a similar dataset for Pleiades (0 planets, ~125 Myr) suggests a trend with age, but may be due to incompleteness of current search pipelines for younger, faster-rotating stars. We see increasing evidence that some planets continue to lose atmosphere past 800 Myr, as now two planets at this age have radii significantly larger than their older counterparts from Kepler.
  • We investigate Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars as a source of feedback contributing to the removal of natal material in the early evolution of massive star clusters. Despite previous work suggesting that massive star clusters clear out their natal material before the massive stars evolve into the WR phase, WR stars have been detected in several emerging massive star clusters. These detections suggest that the timescale for clusters to emerge can be at least as long as the time required to produce WR stars (a few million years), and could also indicate that WR stars may be providing the tipping point in the combined feedback processes that drive a massive star cluster to emerge. We explore the potential overlap between the emerging phase and the WR phase with an observational survey to search for WR stars in emerging massive star clusters hosting WR stars. We select candidate emerging massive star clusters from known radio continuum sources with thermal emission and obtain optical spectra with the 4m Mayall Telescope at Kitt Peak National Observatory and the 6.5m MMT. We identify 21 sources with significantly detected WR signatures, which we term "emerging WR clusters." WR features are detected in $\sim$50% of the radio-selected sample, and thus we find that WR stars are commonly present in massive star clusters currently emerging. The observed extinctions and ages suggest that clusters without WR detections remain embedded for longer periods of time, and may indicate that WR stars can aid, and therefore accelerate, the emergence process.
  • The feedback from massive stars is important to super star cluster (SSC) evolution and the timescales on which it occurs. SSCs form embedded in thick material, and eventually, the cluster is cleared out and revealed at optical wavelengths -- however, this transition is not well understood. We are investigating this critical SSC evolutionary transition with a multi-wavelength observational campaign. Although previously thought to appear after the cluster has fully removed embedding natal material, we have found that SSCs may host large populations of Wolf-Rayet stars. These evolved stars provide ionization and mechanical feedback that we hypothesize is the tipping point in the combined feedback processes that drive a SSC to emerge. Utilizing optical spectra obtained with the 4m Mayall Telescope at Kitt Peak National Observatory and the 6.5m MMT, we have compiled a sample of embedded SSCs that are likely undergoing this short-lived evolutionary phase and in which we confirm the presence of Wolf-Rayet stars. Early results suggest that WRs may accelerate the cluster emergence.
  • We present a panchromatic investigation of the partially-embedded, emerging massive cluster Source 26 (= S26) in NGC 4449 with optical spectra obtained at Apache Point Observatory and archival Hubble, Spitzer, and Herschel Space Telescope images. First identified as a radio continuum source with a thermal component due to ionized material, the massive cluster S26 also exhibits optical Wolf-Rayet (WR) emission lines that reveal a large evolved massive star population. We find that S26 is host to $\sim$240 massive stars, of which $\sim$18 are Wolf-Rayet stars; the relative populations are roughly consistent with other observed massive star forming clusters and galaxies. We construct SEDs over two spatial scales (roughly 100 pc and 300 pc) that clearly exhibit warm dust and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) emission. The best fit dust and grain models reveal that both the intensity of the exciting radiation and PAH grain destruction increase toward the cluster center. Given that the timescale of evacuation is important for the future dynamical evolution of the cluster, it is important to determine whether O- and WR stars can evacuate the material gradually before supernova do so on a much faster timescale. With a minimum age of $\approx$ 3 Myr, it is clear that S26 has not yet fully evacuated its natal material, which indicates that unevolved O-type stars alone do not provide sufficient feedback to remove the gas and dust. We hypothesize that the feedback of WR stars in this cluster may be necessary for clearing the material from the gravitational potential of the cluster. We find S26 is similar to Emission Line Clusters observed in the Antennae Galaxies and may be considered a younger analog to 30 Doradus in the LMC.
  • Previous studies have demonstrated that putatively single nitrogen-type Wolf-Rayet stars (WN stars) without known companions are X-ray sources. However, almost all WN star X-ray detections so far have been of earlier WN2 - WN6 spectral subtypes. Later WN7 - WN9 subtypes (also known as WNL stars) have proved more difficult to detect, an important exception being WR 79a (WN9ha). We present here new X-ray detections of the WNL stars WR 16 (WN8h) and WR 78 (WN7h). These new results, when combined with previous detections, demonstrate that X-ray emission is present in WN stars across the full range of spectral types, including later WNL stars. The two WN8 stars observed to date (WR 16 and WR 40) show unusually low X-ray luminosities (Lx) compared to other WN stars, and it is noteworthy that they also have the lowest terminal wind speeds (v_infty). Existing X-ray detections of about a dozen WN stars reveal a trend of increasing Lx with wind luminosity Lwind = (1/2) M_dot v_infty^2, suggesting that wind kinetic energy may play a key role in establishing X-ray luminosity levels in WN stars.
  • We present first results of a Chandra X-ray observation of the rare oxygen-type Wolf-Rayet star WR 142 (= Sand 5 = St 3) harbored in the young, heavily-obscured cluster Berkeley 87. Oxygen type WO stars are thought to be the most evolved of the WRs and progenitors of supernovae or gamma ray bursts. As part of an X-ray survey of supposedly single Wolf-Rayet stars, we observed WR 142 and the surrounding Berkeley 87 region with Chandra ACIS-I. We detect WR 142 as a faint, yet extremely hard X-ray source. Due to weak emission, its nature as a thermal or nonthermal emitter is unclear and thus we discuss several emission mechanisms. Additionally, we report seven detections and eight non-detections by Chandra of massive OB stars in Berkeley 87, two of which are bright yet soft X-ray sources whose spectra provide a dramatic contrast to the hard emission from WR 142.