• Let K be a nontrivial knot in the 3-sphere with the exterior E(K), and u in G(K), the fundamental group of E(K), a slope element represented by an essential simple closed curve on the boundary of E(K). Since the normal closure of u in G(K) coincides with that of the inverse of u, and u and its inverse u correspond to a slope r, a rational number or 1/0, we write << r >> = << u >>. The normal closure << u >> describes elements which are trivialized by r-Dehn filling of E(K). In this article, we prove that << r_1 >> =<< r_2 >> if and only if r_1 = r_2, and for a given finite family of slopes S = {r_1, ..., r_n}, the intersection of << r_1 >> , << r_2>>, ..., and << r_n >> contains infinitely many elements except when K is a (p, q)-torus knot and pq belongs to S. We also investigate inclusion relation among normal closures of slope elements.
  • Twisting a knot $K$ in $S^3$ along a disjoint unknot $c$ produces a twist family of knots $\{K_n\}$ indexed by the integers. Comparing the behaviors of the Seifert genus $g(K_n)$ and the slice genus $g_4(K_n)$ under twistings, we prove that if $g(K_n) - g_4(K_n) < C$ for some constant $C$ for infinitely many integers $n > 0$ or $g(K_n) / g_4(K_n) \to 1$ as $n \to \infty$, then either the winding number of $K$ about $c$ is zero or the winding number equals the wrapping number. As a key application, if $\{K_n\}$ or the mirror twist family $\{\overline{K_n}\}$ contains infinitely many tight fibered knots, then the latter must occur. We further develop this to show that $c$ is a braid axis of $K$ if and only if both $\{K_n\}$ and $\{\overline{K_n}\}$ each contain infinitely many tight fibered knots. We also give a necessary and sufficient condition for $\{ K_n \}$ to contain infinitely many L-space knots, and show (modulo a conjecture) that satellite L-space knots are braided satellites.
  • Conjecturally, there are only finitely many Heegaard Floer L-space knots in $S^3$ of a given genus. We examine this conjecture for twist families of knots $\{K_n\}$ obtained by twisting a knot $K$ in $S^3$ along an unknot $c$ in terms of the linking number $\omega$ between $K$ and $c$. We establish the conjecture in case of $|\omega| \neq 1$, prove that $\{K_n\}$ contains at most three L-space knots if $\omega = 0$, and address the case where $|\omega| = 1$ under an additional hypothesis about Seifert surgeries. To that end, we characterize a twisting circle $c$ for which $\{ (K_n, r_n) \}$ contains at least ten Seifert surgeries. We also pose a few questions about the nature of twist families of L-space knots, their expressions as closures of positive (or negative) braids, and their wrapping about the twisting circle.
  • It is known that a bi-orderable group has no generalized torsion element, but the converse does not hold in general. We conjecture that the converse holds for the fundamental groups of 3-manifolds, and verify the conjecture for non-hyperbolic, geometric 3-manifolds. We also confirm the conjecture for some infinite families of closed hyperbolic 3-manifolds. In the course of the proof, we prove that each standard generator of the Fibonacci group F(2,m) (m>2) is a generalized torsion element.
  • A non-trivial slope $r$ on a knot $K$ in $S^3$ is called a characterizing slope if whenever the result of $r$-surgery on a knot $K'$ is orientation preservingly homeomorphic to the result of $r$-surgery on $K$, then $K'$ is isotopic to $K$. Ni and Zhang ask: for any hyperbolic knot $K$, is a slope $r = p/q$ with $|p| + |q|$ sufficiently large a characterizing slope? In this article we answer this question in the negative by demonstrating that there is a hyperbolic knot $K$ in $S^3$ which has infinitely many non-characterizing slopes. As the simplest known example, the hyperbolic knot $8_6$ has no integral characterizing slopes.
  • A knot in the 3-sphere is called an L-space knot if it admits a nontrivial Dehn surgery yielding an L-space, i.e. a rational homology 3-sphere with the smallest possible Heegaard Floer homology. Given a knot K, take an unknotted circle c and twist K n times along c to obtain a twist family { K_n }. We give a sufficient condition for { K_n } to contain infinitely many L-space knots. As an application we show that for each torus knot and each hyperbolic Berge knot K, we can take c so that the twist family { K_n } contains infinitely many hyperbolic L-space knots. We also demonstrate that there is a twist family of hyperbolic L-space knots each member of which has tunnel number greater than one.
  • We give a short proof that if a non-trivial band sum of two knots results in a tight fibered knot, then the band sum is a connected sum. In particular, this means that any prime knot obtained by a non-trivial band sum is not tight fibered. Since a positive L-space knot is tight fibered, a non-trivial band sum never yields an L-space knot. Consequently, any knot obtained by a non-trivial band sum cannot admit a finite surgery. For context, we exhibit two examples of non-trivial band sums of tight fibered knots producing prime knots: one is fibered but not tight, and the other is strongly quasipositive but not fibered.
  • The slope conjecture proposed by Garoufalidis asserts that the Jones slopes given by the sequence of degrees of the colored Jones polynomials are boundary slopes. We verify the slope conjecture for graph knots, i.e. knots whose Gromov volume vanish.
  • A knot in the 3-sphere is called an L--space knot if it admits a nontrivial Dehn surgery yielding an L--space. Like torus knots and Berge knots, many L--space knots admit also a Seifert fibered surgery. We give a concrete example of a hyperbolic, L-space knot which has no exceptional surgeries, in particular, no Seifert fibered surgeries.
  • We find an infinite family of Seifert fibered surgeries on strongly invertible knots which do not have primitive/Seifert positions. Each member of the family is obtained from a trefoil knot after alternate twists along a pair of seiferters for a Seifert fibered surgery on a trefoil knot.
  • A Seifert surgery is a pair (K, m) of a knot K in the 3-sphere and an integer m such that m-Dehn surgery on K results in a Seifert fiber space allowed to contain fibers of index zero. Twisting K along a trivial knot called a seiferter for (K, m) yields Seifert surgeries. We study Seifert surgeries obtained from those on a trefoil knot by twisting along their seiferters. Although Seifert surgeries on a trefoil knot are the most basic ones, this family is rich in variety. For any m which is not -2 it contains a successive triple of Seifert surgeries (K, m), (K, m +1), (K, m +2) on a hyperbolic knot K, e.g. 17-, 18-, 19-surgeries on the (-2, 3, 7) pretzel knot. It contains infinitely many Seifert surgeries on strongly invertible hyperbolic knots none of which arises from the primitive/Seifert-fibered construction, e.g. (-1)-surgery on the (3, -3, -3) pretzel knot.
  • How do Seifert surgeries on hyperbolic knots arise from those on torus knots? We approach this question from a networking viewpoint. The Seifert Surgery Network is a 1-dimensional complex whose vertices correspond to Seifert surgeries; two vertices are connected by an edge if one Seifert surgery is obtained from the other by a single twist along a trivial knot called a seiferter or along an annulus cobounded by seiferters. Successive twists along a "hyperbolic seiferter" or a "hyperbolic annular pair" produce infinitely many Seifert surgeries on hyperbolic knots. In this paper, we investigate Seifert surgeries on torus knots which have hyperbolic seiferters or hyperbolic annular pairs, and obtain results suggesting that such surgeries are restricted.
  • Let K be a knot in the 3--sphere. An r-surgery on K is left-orderable if the resulting 3--manifold K(r) of the surgery has left-orderable fundamental group, and an r-surgery on K is called an L-space surgery if K(r) is an L-space. A conjecture of Boyer, Gordon and Watson says that non-reducing surgeries on K can be classified into left-orderable surgeries or L-space surgeries. We introduce a way to provide knots with left-orderable, non-L-space surgeries. As an application we present infinitely many hyperbolic knots on each of which every nontrivial surgery is a hyperbolic, left-orderable, non-L-space surgery.
  • A Seifert surgery is an integral surgery on a knot in S^3 producing a Seifert fiber space which may contain an exceptional fiber of index 0. The Seifert Surgery Network is a 1-dimensional complex whose vertices correspond to Seifert surgeries; its edges correspond to single twistings along "seiferters" or "annular pairs of seiferters". One problem of the network is whether there is a path from each vertex to a vertex on a torus knot, the most basic Seifert surgery. We give a method to find seiferters and annular pairs of seiferters for Seifert surgeries obtained by taking two--fold branched covers of tangles. Concerning three infinite families of Seifert surgeries obtained by the second author via branched covers, we find explicit paths in the network from such surgeries to Seifert surgeries on torus knots.
  • We call a pair (K, m) of a knot K in the 3-sphere S^3 and an integer m a Seifert fibered surgery if m-surgery on K yields a Seifert fiber space. For most known Seifert fibered surgeries (K, m), K can be embedded in a genus 2 Heegaard surface of S^3 in a primitive/Seifert position, the concept introduced by Dean as a natural extension of primitive/primitive position defined by Berge. Recently Guntel has given an infinite family of Seifert fibered surgeries each of which has distinct primitive/Seifert positions. In this paper we give yet other infinite families of Seifert fibered surgeries with distinct primitive/Seifert positions from a different point of view. In particular, we can choose such Seifert surgeries (K, m) so that K is a hyperbolic knot whose complement S^3 - K has an arbitrarily large volume.
  • Which slopes can or cannot appear as Seifert fibered slopes for hyperbolic knots in the 3-sphere S^3? It is conjectured that if r-surgery on a hyperbolic knot in S^3 yields a Seifert fiber space, then r is an integer. We show that for each integer n, there exists a tunnel number one, hyperbolic knot K_n in S^3 such that n-surgery on K_n produces a small Seifert fiber space.
  • We construct two infinite families of knots each of which admits a Seifert fibered surgery with none of these surgeries coming from Dean's primitive/Seifert-fibered construction. This disproves a conjecture that all Seifert fibered surgeries arise from Dean's primitive/Seifert-fibered construction. The (-3,3,5)-pretzel knot belongs to both of the infinite families.