• Using deep HST/ACS observations, we demonstrate that the sub-solar stellar initial mass function (IMF) of 6 ultra-faint dwarf Milky Way Satellites (UFDs) is more bottom light than the IMF of the Milky Way disk. Our data have a lower mass limit of about 0.45 M$_{\odot}$, while the upper limit is $\sim 0.8$ M$_\odot$, set by the turn-off mass of these old, metal poor systems. If formulated as a single power law, we obtain a shallower IMF slope than the "Salpeter" value of $-2.3$, ranging from $-1.01$ for Leo IV, to $-1.87$ for Bo\"otes I. The significance of such deviations depends on the galaxy and is typically 95\% or more. When modeled as a log-normal, the IMF fit results in a larger peak mass than in the Milky Way disk, however a Milky Way disk value for the characteristic system mass ($\sim0.22$ M$_{\odot}$) is excluded only at 68\% significance, and only for some UFDs in the sample. We find that the IMF slope correlates well with the galaxy mean metallicity and, to a lesser degree, with the velocity dispersion and the total mass. The strength of the observed correlations is limited by shot noise in the number of observed stars, but future space-based missions like JWST and WFIRST will both enhance the number of dwarf Milky Way Satellites that can be studied in such detail, and the observation depth for individual galaxies.
  • We have developed a method for deriving the distribution of the Milky Way's interstellar medium as a function of longitude, latitude, distance and line-of-sight velocity. This method takes as input maps of reddening as a function of longitude, latitude, and distance and maps of line emission as a function of longitude, latitude, and line-of-sight velocity. We have applied this method to datasets covering much of the Galactic plane. The output of this method correctly reproduces the line-of-sight velocities of high-mass star forming regions with known distances from Reid et al. (2014) and qualitatively agrees with results from the Milky Way kinematics literature. These maps will be useful for measuring flows of gas around the Milky Way's spiral arms and into and out of giant molecular clouds.
  • We present the Bayesian Extinction And Stellar Tool (BEAST), a probabilistic approach to modeling the dust extinguished photometric spectral energy distribution of an individual star while accounting for observational uncertainties common to large resolved star surveys. Given a set of photometric measurements and an observational uncertainty model, the BEAST infers the physical properties of the stellar source using stellar evolution and atmosphere models and constrains the line of sight extinction using a newly developed mixture model that encompasses the full range of dust extinction curves seen in the Local Group. The BEAST is specifically formulated for use with large multi-band surveys of resolved stellar populations. Our approach accounts for measurement uncertainties and any covariance between them due to stellar crowding (both systematic biases and uncertainties in the bias) and absolute flux calibration, thereby incorporating the full information content of the measurement. We illustrate the accuracy and precision possible with the BEAST using data from the Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury. While the BEAST has been developed for this survey, it can be easily applied to similar existing and planned resolved star surveys.
  • We study the stellar mass Tully-Fisher relation (TFR, stellar mass versus rotation velocity) for a morphologically blind selection of emission line galaxies in the field at redshifts 0.1 $<$ z $<$ 0.375. Kinematics ($\sigma_g$, V$_{rot}$) are measured from emission lines in Keck/DEIMOS spectra and quantitative morphology is measured from V- and I-band Hubble images. We find a transition stellar mass in the TFR, $\log$ M$_*$ = 9.5 M$_{\odot}$. Above this mass, nearly all galaxies are rotation-dominated, on average more morphologically disk-like according to quantitative morphology, and lie on a relatively tight TFR. Below this mass, the TFR has significant scatter to low rotation velocity and galaxies can either be rotation-dominated disks on the TFR or asymmetric or compact galaxies which scatter off. We refer to this transition mass as the "mass of disk formation", M$_{\mathrm{df}}$ because above it all star-forming galaxies form disks (except for a small number of major mergers and highly star-forming systems), whereas below it a galaxy may or may not form a disk.
  • We present a study of the composition of gas and dust in the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds (LMC and SMC, together -- the MCs) as measured by UV absorption spectroscopy. We have measured P II and Fe II along 85 sightlines toward the MCs using archival FUSE observations. For 16 of those sightlines, we have measured Si II, Cr II, and Zn II from new HST COS observations. We have combined these measurements with H I and H$_2$ column densities and reference stellar abundances from the literature to derive gas-phase abundances, depletions, and gas-to-dust ratios (GDRs). 80 of our 84 P measurements and 13 of our 16 Zn measurements are depleted by more than 0.1 decades, suggesting that P and Zn abundances are not accurate metallicity indicators at and above the metallicity of the SMC. The maximum P and Zn depletions are the same in the MW, LMC, and SMC. Si, Cr, and Fe are systematically less depleted in the SMC than in the MW or LMC. The minimum Si depletion in the SMC is consistent with zero. Our depletion-derived GDRs broadly agree with GDRs from the literature. The GDR varies from location to location within a galaxy by a factor of up to 2 in the LMC and up to 5 in the SMC. This variation is evidence of dust destruction and/or growth in the diffuse neutral phase of the interstellar medium.
  • The nature, composition, abundance, and size distribution of dust in galaxies is determined by the rate at which it is created in the different stellar sources and destroyed by interstellar shocks. Because of their extensive wavelength coverage, proximity, and nearly face-on geometry, the Magellanic Clouds (MCs) provide a unique opportunity to study these processes in great detail. In this paper we use the complete sample of supernova remnants (SNRs) in the MCs to calculate the lifetime and destruction efficiencies of silicate and carbon dust in these galaxies. We find dust lifetimes of 22 +- 13 Myr (30 +- 17 Myr) for silicate (carbon) grains in the LMC, and 54 +- 32 Myr (72 +- 43 Myr) for silicate (carbon) grains in the SMC. The significantly shorter lifetimes in the MCs, as compared to the Milky Way, are explained as the combined effect of their lower total dust mass, and the fact that the dust-destroying isolated SNe in the MCs seem to be preferentially occurring in regions with higher than average dust-to-gas (D2G) mass ratios. We also calculate the supernova rate and the current star formation rate in the MCs, and use them to derive maximum dust injection rates by asymptotic giant branch stars and core collapse supernovae. We find that the injection rates are an order of magnitude lower than the dust destruction rates by the SNRs. This supports the conclusion that, unless the dust destruction rates have been considerably overestimated, most of the dust must be reconstituted from surviving grains in dense molecular clouds. More generally, we also discuss the dependence of the dust destruction rate on the local D2G mass ratio, the ambient gas density and metallicity, as well as the application of our results to other galaxies and dust evolution models.
  • The dust properties in the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds are studied using the HERITAGE Herschel Key Project photometric data in five bands from 100 to 500 micron. Three simple models of dust emission were fit to the observations: a single temperature blackbody modified by a power- law emissivity (SMBB), a single temperature blackbody modified by a broken power-law emissivity (BEMBB), and two blackbodies with different temperatures, both modified by the same power-law emissivity (TTMBB). Using these models we investigate the origin of the submm excess; defined as the submillimeter (submm) emission above that expected from SMBB models fit to observations < 200 micron. We find that the BEMBB model produces the lowest fit residuals with pixel-averaged 500 micron submm excesses of 27% and 43% for the LMC and SMC, respectively. Adopting gas masses from previous works, the gas-to-dust ratios calculated from our the fitting results shows that the TTMBB fits require significantly more dust than are available even if all the metals present in the interstellar medium (ISM) were condensed into dust. This indicates that the submm excess is more likely to be due to emissivity variations than a second population of colder dust. We derive integrated dust masses of (7.3 +/- 1.7) x 10^5 and (8.3 +/- 2.1) times 10^4 M(sun) for the LMC and SMC, respectively. We find significant correlations between the submm excess and other dust properties; further work is needed to determine the relative contributions of fitting noise and ISM physics to the correlations.