• In many scientific and engineering applications, we are tasked with the maximisation of an expensive to evaluate black box function $f$. Traditional settings for this problem assume just the availability of this single function. However, in many cases, cheap approximations to $f$ may be obtainable. For example, the expensive real world behaviour of a robot can be approximated by a cheap computer simulation. We can use these approximations to eliminate low function value regions cheaply and use the expensive evaluations of $f$ in a small but promising region and speedily identify the optimum. We formalise this task as a \emph{multi-fidelity} bandit problem where the target function and its approximations are sampled from a Gaussian process. We develop MF-GP-UCB, a novel method based on upper confidence bound techniques. In our theoretical analysis we demonstrate that it exhibits precisely the above behaviour, and achieves better regret than strategies which ignore multi-fidelity information. Empirically, MF-GP-UCB outperforms such naive strategies and other multi-fidelity methods on several synthetic and real experiments.
  • Bayesian Optimisation (BO) refers to a class of methods for global optimisation of a function $f$ which is only accessible via point evaluations. It is typically used in settings where $f$ is expensive to evaluate. A common use case for BO in machine learning is model selection, where it is not possible to analytically model the generalisation performance of a statistical model, and we resort to noisy and expensive training and validation procedures to choose the best model. Conventional BO methods have focused on Euclidean and categorical domains, which, in the context of model selection, only permits tuning scalar hyper-parameters of machine learning algorithms. However, with the surge of interest in deep learning, there is an increasing demand to tune neural network \emph{architectures}. In this work, we develop NASBOT, a Gaussian process based BO framework for neural architecture search. To accomplish this, we develop a distance metric in the space of neural network architectures which can be computed efficiently via an optimal transport program. This distance might be of independent interest to the deep learning community as it may find applications outside of BO. We demonstrate that NASBOT outperforms other alternatives for architecture search in several cross validation based model selection tasks on multi-layer perceptrons and convolutional neural networks.
  • We design and analyse variations of the classical Thompson sampling (TS) procedure for Bayesian optimisation (BO) in settings where function evaluations are expensive, but can be performed in parallel. Our theoretical analysis shows that a direct application of the sequential Thompson sampling algorithm in either synchronous or asynchronous parallel settings yields a surprisingly powerful result: making $n$ evaluations distributed among $M$ workers is essentially equivalent to performing $n$ evaluations in sequence. Further, by modeling the time taken to complete a function evaluation, we show that, under a time constraint, asynchronously parallel TS achieves asymptotically lower regret than both the synchronous and sequential versions. These results are complemented by an experimental analysis, showing that asynchronous TS outperforms a suite of existing parallel BO algorithms in simulations and in a hyper-parameter tuning application in convolutional neural networks. In addition to these, the proposed procedure is conceptually and computationally much simpler than existing work for parallel BO.
  • Bandit methods for black-box optimisation, such as Bayesian optimisation, are used in a variety of applications including hyper-parameter tuning and experiment design. Recently, \emph{multi-fidelity} methods have garnered considerable attention since function evaluations have become increasingly expensive in such applications. Multi-fidelity methods use cheap approximations to the function of interest to speed up the overall optimisation process. However, most multi-fidelity methods assume only a finite number of approximations. In many practical applications however, a continuous spectrum of approximations might be available. For instance, when tuning an expensive neural network, one might choose to approximate the cross validation performance using less data $N$ and/or few training iterations $T$. Here, the approximations are best viewed as arising out of a continuous two dimensional space $(N,T)$. In this work, we develop a Bayesian optimisation method, BOCA, for this setting. We characterise its theoretical properties and show that it achieves better regret than than strategies which ignore the approximations. BOCA outperforms several other baselines in synthetic and real experiments.
  • We study reinforcement learning of chatbots with recurrent neural network architectures when the rewards are noisy and expensive to obtain. For instance, a chatbot used in automated customer service support can be scored by quality assurance agents, but this process can be expensive, time consuming and noisy. Previous reinforcement learning work for natural language processing uses on-policy updates and/or is designed for on-line learning settings. We demonstrate empirically that such strategies are not appropriate for this setting and develop an off-policy batch policy gradient method (BPG). We demonstrate the efficacy of our method via a series of synthetic experiments and an Amazon Mechanical Turk experiment on a restaurant recommendations dataset.
  • A common problem in disciplines of applied Statistics research such as Astrostatistics is of estimating the posterior distribution of relevant parameters. Typically, the likelihoods for such models are computed via expensive experiments such as cosmological simulations of the universe. An urgent challenge in these research domains is to develop methods that can estimate the posterior with few likelihood evaluations. In this paper, we study active posterior estimation in a Bayesian setting when the likelihood is expensive to evaluate. Existing techniques for posterior estimation are based on generating samples representative of the posterior. Such methods do not consider efficiency in terms of likelihood evaluations. In order to be query efficient we treat posterior estimation in an active regression framework. We propose two myopic query strategies to choose where to evaluate the likelihood and implement them using Gaussian processes. Via experiments on a series of synthetic and real examples we demonstrate that our approach is significantly more query efficient than existing techniques and other heuristics for posterior estimation.
  • We study a variant of the classical stochastic $K$-armed bandit where observing the outcome of each arm is expensive, but cheap approximations to this outcome are available. For example, in online advertising the performance of an ad can be approximated by displaying it for shorter time periods or to narrower audiences. We formalise this task as a multi-fidelity bandit, where, at each time step, the forecaster may choose to play an arm at any one of $M$ fidelities. The highest fidelity (desired outcome) expends cost $\lambda^{(m)}$. The $m^{\text{th}}$ fidelity (an approximation) expends $\lambda^{(m)} < \lambda^{(M)}$ and returns a biased estimate of the highest fidelity. We develop MF-UCB, a novel upper confidence bound procedure for this setting and prove that it naturally adapts to the sequence of available approximations and costs thus attaining better regret than naive strategies which ignore the approximations. For instance, in the above online advertising example, MF-UCB would use the lower fidelities to quickly eliminate suboptimal ads and reserve the larger expensive experiments on a small set of promising candidates. We complement this result with a lower bound and show that MF-UCB is nearly optimal under certain conditions.
  • Recently, there has been a surge of interest in using spectral methods for estimating latent variable models. However, it is usually assumed that the distribution of the observations conditioned on the latent variables is either discrete or belongs to a parametric family. In this paper, we study the estimation of an $m$-state hidden Markov model (HMM) with only smoothness assumptions, such as H\"olderian conditions, on the emission densities. By leveraging some recent advances in continuous linear algebra and numerical analysis, we develop a computationally efficient spectral algorithm for learning nonparametric HMMs. Our technique is based on computing an SVD on nonparametric estimates of density functions by viewing them as \emph{continuous matrices}. We derive sample complexity bounds via concentration results for nonparametric density estimation and novel perturbation theory results for continuous matrices. We implement our method using Chebyshev polynomial approximations. Our method is competitive with other baselines on synthetic and real problems and is also very computationally efficient.
  • High dimensional nonparametric regression is an inherently difficult problem with known lower bounds depending exponentially in dimension. A popular strategy to alleviate this curse of dimensionality has been to use additive models of \emph{first order}, which model the regression function as a sum of independent functions on each dimension. Though useful in controlling the variance of the estimate, such models are often too restrictive in practical settings. Between non-additive models which often have large variance and first order additive models which have large bias, there has been little work to exploit the trade-off in the middle via additive models of intermediate order. In this work, we propose SALSA, which bridges this gap by allowing interactions between variables, but controls model capacity by limiting the order of interactions. SALSA minimises the residual sum of squares with squared RKHS norm penalties. Algorithmically, it can be viewed as Kernel Ridge Regression with an additive kernel. When the regression function is additive, the excess risk is only polynomial in dimension. Using the Girard-Newton formulae, we efficiently sum over a combinatorial number of terms in the additive expansion. Via a comparison on $15$ real datasets, we show that our method is competitive against $21$ other alternatives.
  • Bayesian Optimisation (BO) is a technique used in optimising a $D$-dimensional function which is typically expensive to evaluate. While there have been many successes for BO in low dimensions, scaling it to high dimensions has been notoriously difficult. Existing literature on the topic are under very restrictive settings. In this paper, we identify two key challenges in this endeavour. We tackle these challenges by assuming an additive structure for the function. This setting is substantially more expressive and contains a richer class of functions than previous work. We prove that, for additive functions the regret has only linear dependence on $D$ even though the function depends on all $D$ dimensions. We also demonstrate several other statistical and computational benefits in our framework. Via synthetic examples, a scientific simulation and a face detection problem we demonstrate that our method outperforms naive BO on additive functions and on several examples where the function is not additive.
  • We propose and analyze estimators for statistical functionals of one or more distributions under nonparametric assumptions. Our estimators are based on the theory of influence functions, which appear in the semiparametric statistics literature. We show that estimators based either on data-splitting or a leave-one-out technique enjoy fast rates of convergence and other favorable theoretical properties. We apply this framework to derive estimators for several popular information theoretic quantities, and via empirical evaluation, show the advantage of this approach over existing estimators.
  • We give a comprehensive theoretical characterization of a nonparametric estimator for the $L_2^2$ divergence between two continuous distributions. We first bound the rate of convergence of our estimator, showing that it is $\sqrt{n}$-consistent provided the densities are sufficiently smooth. In this smooth regime, we then show that our estimator is asymptotically normal, construct asymptotic confidence intervals, and establish a Berry-Ess\'{e}en style inequality characterizing the rate of convergence to normality. We also show that this estimator is minimax optimal.
  • We consider nonparametric estimation of $L_2$, Renyi-$\alpha$ and Tsallis-$\alpha$ divergences between continuous distributions. Our approach is to construct estimators for particular integral functionals of two densities and translate them into divergence estimators. For the integral functionals, our estimators are based on corrections of a preliminary plug-in estimator. We show that these estimators achieve the parametric convergence rate of $n^{-1/2}$ when the densities' smoothness, $s$, are both at least $d/4$ where $d$ is the dimension. We also derive minimax lower bounds for this problem which confirm that $s > d/4$ is necessary to achieve the $n^{-1/2}$ rate of convergence. We validate our theoretical guarantees with a number of simulations.