• Isolated quantum many-body systems with integrable dynamics generically do not thermalize when taken far from equilibrium. As one perturbs such systems away from the integrable point, thermalization sets in, but the nature of the crossover from integrable to thermalizing behavior is an unresolved and actively discussed question. We explore this question by studying the dynamics of the momentum distribution function in a dipolar quantum Newton's cradle consisting of highly magnetic dysprosium atoms. This is accomplished by creating the first one-dimensional Bose gas with strong magnetic dipole-dipole interactions. These interactions provide tunability of both the strength of the integrability-breaking perturbation and the nature of the near-integrable dynamics. We provide the first experimental evidence that thermalization close to a strongly interacting integrable point occurs in two steps: prethermalization followed by near-exponential thermalization. Exact numerical calculations on a two-rung lattice model yield a similar two-timescale process, suggesting that this is generic in strongly interacting near-integrable models. Moreover, the measured thermalization rate is consistent with a parameter-free theoretical estimate, based on identifying the types of collisions that dominate thermalization. By providing tunability between regimes of integrable and nonintegrable dynamics, our work sheds light both on the mechanisms by which isolated quantum many-body systems thermalize, and on the temporal structure of the onset of thermalization.
  • We implement numerical linked cluster expansions (NLCEs) to study dynamics of lattice systems following quantum quenches, and focus on a hard-core boson model in one-dimensional lattices. We find that, in the nonintegrable regime and within the accessible times, local observables exhibit exponential relaxation. We determine the relaxation rate as one departs from the integrable point and show that it scales quadratically with the strength of the integrability breaking perturbation. We compare the NLCE results with those from exact diagonalization calculations on finite chains with periodic boundary conditions, and show that NLCEs are far more accurate.
  • We discuss the application of numerical linked cluster expansions (NLCEs) to study one dimensional lattice systems in thermal equilibrium and after quantum quenches from thermal equilibrium states. For the former, we calculate observables in the grand canonical ensemble, and for the latter we calculate observables in the diagonal ensemble. When converged, NLCEs provide results in the thermodynamic limit. We use two different NLCEs - a maximally connected expansion introduced in previous works and a site-based expansion. We compare the effectiveness of both NLCEs. The site-based NLCE is found to work best for systems in thermal equilibrium. However, in thermal equilibrium and after quantum quenches, the site-based NLCE can diverge when the maximally connected one converges. We relate this divergence to the exponentially large number of clusters in the site-based NLCE and the behavior of the weights of observables in those clusters. We discuss the effectiveness of resummations to cure the divergence. Our NLCE calculations are compared to exact diagonalization ones in lattices with periodic boundary conditions. NLCEs are found to outperform exact diagonalization in periodic systems for all quantities studied.
  • We investigate the cause of the divergence of the entanglement entropy for the free scalar fields in $(1+1)$ and $(D + 1)$ dimensional space-times. In a canonically equivalent set of variables, we show explicitly that the divergence in the entanglement entropy of the continuum field in $(1 + 1)-$ dimensions is due to the accumulation of large number of near-zero frequency modes as opposed to the commonly held view of divergence having UV origin. The feature revealing the divergence in zero modes is related to the observation that the entropy is invariant under a hidden scaling transformation even when the Hamiltonian is not. We discuss the role of dispersion relations and the dimensionality of the space-time on the behavior of entanglement entropy.