• The energy source powering the extreme optical luminosity of hydrogen-stripped Superluminous Supernovae (SLSNe-I) is not known, but recent studies have highlighted the case for a central engine. Radio and/or X-ray observations are best placed to track the fastest ejecta and probe the presence of outflows from a central engine. We compile all the published radio observations of SLSNe-I to date and present three new observations of two new SLSNe-I. None were detected. Through modeling the radio emission, we constrain the sub-parsec environments and possible outflows in SLSNe-I. In this sample we rule out on-axis collimated relativistic jets of the kind detected in Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs). We constrain off-axis jets with opening angles of 5\arcdeg\ (30\arcdeg) to energies of $\rm{E_k<4\times10^{50}\,erg}$ ($\rm{E_k<10^{50}\,erg}$) in environments shaped by progenitors with mass-loss rates of $\dot{M}<10^{-4}\,M_{\odot}\,{\rm yr}^{-1}$ ($\dot{M}<10^{-5}\,M_{\odot}\,{\rm yr}^{-1}$) for all off-axis angles, assuming fiducial values $\epsilon_e=0.1$ and $\epsilon_B=0.01$. The deepest limits rule out emission of the kind seen in faint un-collimated GRBs (with the exception of GRB\,060218), and from relativistic supernovae. Finally, for the closest SLSN-I SN 2017egm we constrained the energy of an uncollimated non-relativistic outflow like those observed in normal SNe to $E_{\rm k}\lesssim10^{48}$ erg.
  • To confirm the nature of the donor star in the ultra-compact X-ray binary candidate 47 Tuc X9, we obtained optical spectra (3,000$-$10,000 {\AA}) with the Hubble Space Telescope / Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph. We find no strong emission or absorption features in the spectrum of X9. In particular, we place $3\sigma$ upper limits on the H$\alpha$ and HeII $\lambda 4686$ emission line equivalent widths $-$EW$_{\mathrm{H\alpha}} \lesssim 14$ {\AA} and $-$EW$_{\mathrm{HeII}} \lesssim 9$ {\AA}, respectively. This is much lower than seen for typical X-ray binaries at a similar X-ray luminosity (which, for $L_{\mathrm{2-10 keV}} \approx 10^{33}-10^{34}$ erg s$^{-1}$ is typically $-$EW$_{\mathrm{H\alpha}} \sim 50$ {\AA}). This supports our previous suggestion (by Bahramian et al.) of an H-poor donor in X9. We perform timing analysis on archival far-ultraviolet, $V$ and $I$-band data to search for periodicities. In the optical bands we recover the seven-day superorbital period initially discovered in X-rays, but we do not recover the orbital period. In the far-ultraviolet we find evidence for a 27.2 min period (shorter than the 28.2 min period seen in X-rays). We find that either a neutron star or black hole could explain the observed properties of X9. We also perform binary evolution calculations, showing that the formation of an initial black hole / He-star binary early in the life of a globular cluster could evolve into a present-day system such as X9 (should the compact object in this system indeed be a black hole) via mass-transfer driven by gravitational wave radiation.
  • We present Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array radio frequency observations of the new accreting millisecond X-ray pulsar (AMXP), IGR J16597$-$3704, located in the globular cluster NGC 6256. With these data, we detect a radio counterpart to IGR J16597$-$3704, and determine an improved source position. Pairing our radio observations with quasi-simultaneous Swift/XRT X-ray observations, we place IGR J16597$-$3704 on the radio -- X-ray luminosity plane, where we find that IGR J16597$-$3704 is one of the more radio-quiet neutron star low-mass X-ray binaries known to date. We discuss the mechanisms that may govern radio luminosity (and in turn jet production and evolution) in AMXPs. Further, we use our derived radio position to search for a counterpart in archival Hubble Space Telescope and Chandra X-ray Observatory data, and estimate an upper limit on the X-ray luminosity of IGR J16597$-$3704 during quiescence.
  • We report on multiwavelength observations of nova SMCN 2016-10a. The present observational set is one of the most comprehensive for any nova in the Small Magellanic Cloud, including: low, medium, and high resolution optical spectroscopy and spectropolarimetry from SALT, FLOYDS, and SOAR; long-term OGLE $V$- and $I$- bands photometry dating back to six years before eruption; SMARTS optical and near-IR photometry from $\sim$ 11 days until over 280 days post-eruption; $Swift$ satellite X-ray and ultraviolet observations from $\sim$ 6 days until 319 days post-eruption. The progenitor system contains a bright disk and a main sequence or a sub-giant secondary. The nova is very fast with $t_2 \simeq$ 4.0 $\pm$ 1.0 d and $t_3 \simeq$ 7.8 $\pm$ 2.0 d in the $V$-band. If the nova is in the SMC, at a distance of $\sim$ 61 $\pm$ 10 kpc, we derive $M_{V,\mathrm{max}} \simeq - 10.5$ $\pm$ 0.5, making it the brightest nova ever discovered in the SMC and one of the brightest on record. At day 5 post-eruption the spectral lines show a He/N spectroscopic class and a FWHM of $\sim$ 3500 kms$^{-1}$ indicating moderately high ejection velocities. The nova entered the nebular phase $\sim$ 20 days post-eruption, predicting the imminent super-soft source turn-on in the X-rays, which started $\sim$ 28 days post-eruption. The super-soft source properties indicate a white dwarf mass between 1.2 M$_{\odot}$ and 1.3 M$_{\odot}$ in good agreement with the optical conclusions.
  • This catalog summarizes information for all supernovae discovered by the All-Sky Automated Survey for SuperNovae (ASAS-SN) and all other bright ($m_{peak}\leq17$), spectroscopically confirmed supernovae discovered in 2016. We then gather the near-IR through UV magnitudes of all host galaxies and the offsets of the supernovae from the centers of their hosts from public databases. We illustrate the results using a sample that now totals 668 supernovae discovered since 2014 May 1, including the supernovae from our previous catalogs, with type distributions closely matching those of the ideal magnitude limited sample from Li et al. (2011). This is the third of a series of yearly papers on bright supernovae and their hosts from the ASAS-SN team.
  • We present the ultraviolet (UV) spectroscopic evolution of a tidal disruption event (TDE) for the first time. After the discovery of the nearby TDE iPTF16fnl, we obtained a series of observations with the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) onboard the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). The dominant emission features closely resemble those seen in the UV spectra of the TDE ASASSN-14li and are also similar to those of N-rich quasars. However, there is significant evolution in the shape and central wavelength of the line profiles over the course of our observations, such that at early times the lines are broad and redshifted, while at later times the lines are significantly narrower and peak near the wavelengths of their corresponding atomic transitions. Like ASASSN-14li, but unlike N-rich quasars, iPTF16fnl shows neither MgII$\lambda 2798$\AA\ nor CIII]$\lambda 1909$\AA\ emission features. We also present optical photometry and spectroscopy, which suggest that the complex HeII profiles observed in the optical spectra of many TDEs are in part due to the presence of NIII and CIII Wolf-Rayet features, which can potentially serve as probes of the far-UV when space-based observations are not possible. Finally, we use Swift XRT and UVOT observations to place strong limits on the X-ray emission and determine the characteristic temperature, radius, and luminosity of the emitting material. We find that iPTF16fnl is subluminous and evolves more rapidly than other optically discovered TDEs.
  • Blazars, one of the most extreme class of active galaxies, constitute so far the largest known population of $\gamma$-ray sources and their number is continuously growing in the Fermi catalogs. However in the latest release of the Fermi catalog there is still a large fraction of sources that are classified as blazar candidate of uncertain type (BCUs) for which optical spectroscopic observations are necessary to confirm their nature and their associations. In addition about 1/3 of the $\gamma$-ray point sources listed in the Third Fermi-LAT Source Catalog (3FGL) are still unassociated and lacking an assigned lower energy counterpart. Since 2012 we have been carrying out an optical spectroscopic campaign to observe blazar candidates to confirm their nature. In this paper, the sixth of the series, we present optical spectroscopic observations for 30 $\gamma$-ray blazar candidates from different observing programs we carried out with the TNG, WHT, OAN, SOAR and Magellan telescopes. We found that 21 out of 30 sources investigated are BL Lac objects while the remaining targets are classified as flat spectrum radio quasars showing the typical broad emission lines of normal quasi stellar objects. We conclude that our selection of $\gamma$-ray blazars candidates based on their multifrequency properties continues to be a successful way to discover potential low-energy counterparts of the FermiUnidentified Gamma-ray Sources (UGSs) and to confirm the nature of BCUs.
  • Gamma-ray binaries consist of a neutron star or a black hole interacting with a normal star to produce gamma-ray emission that dominates the radiative output of the system. Only a handful of such systems have been previously discovered, all within our Galaxy. Here we report the discovery with the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) of a luminous gamma-ray binary in the Large Magellanic Cloud from a search for periodic modulation in all sources in the third Fermi LAT catalog. This is the first such system to be found outside the Milky Way. The system has an orbital period of 10.3 days and is associated with a massive O5III star located in the supernova remnant DEM L241, previously identified as the candidate high-mass X-ray binary (HMXB) CXOU J053600.0-673507. X-ray and radio emission are also modulated on the 10.3 day period, but are in anti-phase with the gamma-ray modulation. Optical radial velocity measurements suggest that the system contains a neutron star. The source is significantly more luminous than similar sources in the Milky Way at radio, optical, X-ray and gamma-ray wavelengths. The detection of this extra-galactic system, but no new Galactic systems raises the possibility that the predicted number of gamma-ray binaries in our Galaxy has been overestimated, and that HMXBs may be born containing relatively slowly rotating neutron stars.
  • We present the results of VLA, ATCA, and Swift XRT observations of the 2015 outburst of the transient neutron star X-ray binary (NSXB), EXO 1745$-$248, located in the globular cluster Terzan 5. Combining (near-) simultaneous radio and X-ray measurements we measure a correlation between the radio and X-ray luminosities of $L_R\propto L_X^\beta$ with $\beta=1.68^{+0.10}_{-0.09}$, linking the accretion flow (probed by X-ray luminosity) and the compact jet (probed by radio luminosity). While such a relationship has been studied in multiple black hole X-ray binaries (BHXBs), this work marks only the third NSXB with such a measurement. Constraints on this relationship in NSXBs are strongly needed, as comparing this correlation between different classes of XB systems is key in understanding the properties that affect the jet production process in accreting objects. Our best fit disc-jet coupling index for EXO 1745$-$248 is consistent with the measured correlation in NSXB 4U 1728$-$34 ($\beta=1.5\pm 0.2$) but inconsistent with the correlation we fit using the most recent measurements from the literature of NSXB Aql X-1 ($\beta=0.76^{+0.14}_{-0.15}$). While a similar disc-jet coupling index appears to hold across multiple BHXBs in the hard accretion state, this does not appear to be the case with the three NSXBs measured so far. Additionally, the normalization of the EXO 1745$-$248 correlation is lower than the other two NSXBs, making it one of the most radio faint XBs ever detected in the hard state. We also report the detection of a type-I X-ray burst during this outburst, where the decay timescale is consistent with hydrogen burning.
  • We report the detection of an infrared selected transient which has lasted at least 5 years, first identified by a large mid-infrared and optical outburst from a faint X-ray source detected with the Chandra X-ray Observatory. In this paper we rule out several scenarios for the cause of this outburst, including a classical nova, a luminous red nova, AGN flaring, a stellar merger, and intermediate luminosity optical transients, and interpret this transient as the result of a Young Stellar Object (YSO) of at least solar mass accreting material from the remains of the dusty envelope from which it formed, in isolation from either a dense complex of cold gas or massive star formation. This object does not fit neatly into other existing categories of large outbursts of YSOs (FU Orionis types) which may be a result of the object's mass, age, and environment. It is also possible that this object is a new type of transient unrelated to YSOs.
  • The observed relation between the X-ray and radio properties of low-luminosity accreting black holes has enabled the identification of multiple candidate black hole X-ray binaries (BHXBs) in globular clusters. Here we report an identification of the radio source VLA J213002.08+120904 (aka M15 S2), recently reported in Kirsten et al. 2014, as a BHXB candidate. They showed that the parallax of this flat-spectrum variable radio source indicates a 2.2$^{+0.5}_{-0.3}$ kpc distance, which identifies it as lying in the foreground of the globular cluster M15. We determine the radio characteristics of this source, and place a deep limit on the X-ray luminosity of $\sim4\times10^{29}$ erg s$^{-1}$. Furthermore, we astrometrically identify a faint red stellar counterpart in archival Hubble images, with colors consistent with a foreground star; at 2.2 kpc its inferred mass is 0.1-0.2 $M_{\odot}$. We rule out that this object is a pulsar, neutron star X-ray binary, cataclysmic variable, or planetary nebula, concluding that VLA J213002.08+120904 is the first accreting black hole X-ray binary candidate discovered in quiescence outside a globular cluster. Given the relatively small area over which parallax studies of radio sources have been performed, this discovery suggests a much larger population of quiescent BHXBs in our Galaxy, $2.6\times10^4-1.7\times10^8$ BHXBs at $3\sigma$ confidence, than has been previously estimated ($\sim10^2-10^4$) through population synthesis.
  • We present multi-wavelength observations of SN2014C during the first 500 days. These observations represent the first solid detection of a young extragalactic stripped-envelope SN out to high-energy X-rays. SN2014C was the explosion of an H-stripped progenitor star with ordinary explosion parameters. However, over the time scale of ~1yr, SN2014C experienced a complete metamorphosis and evolved from an ordinary H-poor supernova of type Ib into a strongly interacting, H-rich supernova of type IIn. Signatures of the SN shock interacting with a dense medium are observed across the spectrum. Coordinated observations with Swift, Chandra and NuSTAR have captured the evolution in detail and revealed the presence of a massive shell of ~1 Msun of hydrogen-rich material at ~6d16 cm from the explosion site. We estimate that the shell was ejected by the progenitor star in the decades to centuries before core collapse. This result poses significant challenges to current theories of massive star evolution, as it requires a physical mechanism responsible for the ejection of the deepest hydrogen layer of H-poor SN progenitors synchronized with the onset of stellar collapse. Theoretical investigations point at binary interactions and/or instabilities during the last stages of nuclear burning in massive stars as potential triggers of the time-dependent mass loss. We constrain these scenarios utilizing the sample of 183 SNe Ib/c with public radio observations. Our analysis identifies SN2014C-like signatures in ~10% of SNe with constraining radio data. This fraction is somewhat larger but reasonably consistent with the expectation from the theory of recent envelope ejection due to binary evolution IF the ejected material can survive in the close environment for 1000-10000 yrs. Alternatively, nuclear burning instabilities extending all the way to the core C-burning phase might also play a critical role.
  • Optical (BVRI) and infrared (JHK) photometry of the gamma-ray nova Nova Sco 2012 (V1324 Sco) is presented and the lightcurve reconstructed and discussed. An interstellar reddening E(B-V)=1.23 is derived. Dust begun to form at an early date in the nova, only one magnitude down and 20 days past maximum optical brightness and caused an extinction of at least 6 magnitudes in V band, that cleared some months later. This unusual early dust formation compromises the application of the magnitude at maximum versus rate of decline (MMRD) relations in estimating the distance to the nova.
  • Determining reliable distances to classical novae is a challenging but crucial step in deriving their ejected masses and explosion energetics. Here we combine radio expansion measurements from the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array with velocities derived from optical spectra to estimate an expansion parallax for nova V959 Mon, the first nova discovered through its gamma-ray emission. We spatially resolve the nova at frequencies of 4.5-36.5 GHz in nine different imaging epochs. The first five epochs cover the expansion of the ejecta from 2012 October to 2013 January, while the final four epochs span 2014 February to 2014 May. These observations correspond to days 126 through 199 and days 615 through 703 after the first detection of the nova. The images clearly show a non-spherical ejecta geometry. Utilizing ejecta velocities derived from 3D modelling of optical spectroscopy, the radio expansion implies a distance between 0.9 +/- 0.2 and 2.2 +/- 0.4 kpc, with a most probable distance of 1.4 +/- 0.4 kpc. This distance implies a gamma-ray luminosity much less than the prototype gamma-ray-detected nova, V407 Cyg, possibly due to the lack of a red giant companion in the V959 Mon system. V959 Mon also has a much lower gamma-ray luminosity than other classical novae detected in gamma-rays to date, indicating a range of at least a factor of 10 in the gamma-ray luminosities for these explosions.
  • Deep late-time X-ray observations of the relativistic, engine-driven, type Ic SN2012ap allow us to probe the nearby environment of the explosion and reveal the unique properties of relativistic SNe. We find that on a local scale of ~0.01 pc the environment was shaped directly by the evolution of the progenitor star with a pre-explosion mass-loss rate <5x10^-6 Msun yr-1 in line with GRBs and the other relativistic SN2009bb. Like sub-energetic GRBs, SN2012ap is characterized by a bright radio emission and evidence for mildly relativistic ejecta. However, its late time (t~20 days) X-ray emission is ~100 times fainter than the faintest sub-energetic GRB at the same epoch, with no evidence for late-time central engine activity. These results support theoretical proposals that link relativistic SNe like 2009bb and 2012ap with the weakest observed engine-driven explosions, where the jet barely fails to breakout. Furthermore, our observations demonstrate that the difference between relativistic SNe and sub-energetic GRBs is intrinsic and not due to line-of-sight effects. This phenomenology can either be due to an intrinsically shorter-lived engine or to a more extended progenitor in relativistic SNe.
  • Observations of novae at radio frequencies provide us with a measure of the total ejected mass, density profile and kinetic energy of a nova eruption. The radio emission is typically well characterized by the free-free emission process. Most models to date have assumed spherical symmetry for the eruption, although it has been known for as long as there have been radio observations of these systems, that spherical eruptions are to simplistic a geometry. In this paper, we build bipolar models of the nova eruption, assuming the free-free process, and show the effects of varying different parameters on the radio light curves. The parameters considered include the ratio of the minor- to major-axis, the inclination angle and shell thickness (further parameters are provided in the appendix). We also show the uncertainty introduced when fitting spherical model synthetic light curves to bipolar model synthetic light curves. We find that the optically thick phase rises with the same power law ($S_{\nu} \propto t^2$) for both the spherical and bipolar models. In the bipolar case there is a "plateau" phase -- depending on the thickness of the shell as well as the ratio of the minor- to major-axis -- before the final decline, that follows the same power law ($S_{\nu} \propto t^{-3}$) as in the spherical case. Finally, fitting spherical models to the bipolar model synthetic light curves requires, in the worst case scenario, doubling the ejected mass, more than halving the electron temperature and reducing the shell thickness by nearly a factor of 10. This implies that in some systems we have been over predicting the ejected masses and under predicting the electron temperature of the ejecta.
  • One of the main questions concerning Type Ia supernovae is the nature of the binary companion of the exploding white dwarf. A major discriminant between different suggested models is the presence and physical properties of circumstellar material at the time of explosion. If present, this material will be ionized by the ultra-violet radiation of the explosion and later recombine. This ionization-recombination should manifest itself as time-variable absorption features that can be detected via multi-epoch high-spectral-resolution observations. Previous studies have shown that the strongest effect is seen in the neutral sodium D lines. We report on observations of neutral sodium absorption features observed in multi-epoch high-resolution spectra of 14 Type Ia supernova events. This is the first multi-epoch high-resolution study to include multiple SNe. No variability in line strength that can be associated with circumstellar material is detected. We find that ~18% of the events in the extended sample exhibit time-variable sodium features associated with circumstellar material. We explore the implication of this study on our understanding of the progenitor systems of Type Ia supernovae via the current Type Ia supernova multi-epoch high-spectral-resolution sample.
  • We present the Pan-STARRS1 discovery of the long-lived and blue transient PS1-11af, which was also detected by GALEX with coordinated observations in the near-ultraviolet (NUV) band. PS1-11af is associated with the nucleus of an early-type galaxy at redshift z=0.4046 that exhibits no evidence for star formation or AGN activity. Four epochs of spectroscopy reveal a pair of transient broad absorption features in the UV on otherwise featureless spectra. Despite the superficial similarity of these features to P-Cygni absorptions of supernovae (SNe), we conclude that PS1-11af is not consistent with the properties of known types of SNe. Blackbody fits to the spectral energy distribution are inconsistent with the cooling, expanding ejecta of a SN, and the velocities of the absorption features are too high to represent material in homologous expansion near a SN photosphere. However, the constant blue colors and slow evolution of the luminosity are similar to previous optically-selected tidal disruption events (TDEs). The shape of the optical light curve is consistent with models for TDEs, but the minimum accreted mass necessary to power the observed luminosity is only ~0.002M_sun, which points to a partial disruption model. A full disruption model predicts higher bolometric luminosities, which would require most of the radiation to be emitted in a separate component at high energies where we lack observations. In addition, the observed temperature is lower than that predicted by pure accretion disk models for TDEs and requires reprocessing to a constant, lower temperature. Three deep non-detections in the radio with the VLA over the first two years after the event set strict limits on the production of any relativistic outflow comparable to Swift J1644+57, even if off-axis.
  • We present and discuss accurate and densely mapped BVRI lightcurves of the neon Nova Mon 2012, supplemented by the evolution in Stromgren b and y bands and in the integrated flux of relevant emission lines. Our monitoring started with the optical discovery of the nova and extend to day +270, well past the end of the super-soft phase in X-rays. The nova displayed very smoothly evolving lightcurves. A bifurcation between y and V light-curves took place at the start of the SSS phase, and a knee developed toward the end of the SSS phase. The apparent magnitude of the nova at the unobserved optical maximum is constrained to +2.8=<V=<4.2. The appearance, grow in amplitude and then demise of a 0.29585 (+/-0.00002) days orbital modulation of the optical brightness was followed along the nova evolution. The observed modulation has a near-sinusoidal shape and a weak secondary minimum at phase 0.5. We favor an interpretation in terms of super-imposed ellipsoidal distortion of the Roche lobe filling companion and irradiation of its side facing the WD. Similar lightcurves are typical of symbiotic stars where a Roche lobe filling giant is irradiated by a very hot WD. Given the high orbital inclination, mutual occultation between the donor star and the accretion disk could contribute to the observed modulation. The optical+infrared spectral energy distribution of Nova Mon 2012 during the quiescence preceeding the outburst is nicely fitted by a early K-type main-sequence star (~K3V) at 1.5 kpc distance, reddened by E(B-V)=0.38, with a WD companion and an accretion disk contributing to the observed blue excess and moderate Halpha emission. A typical early K-type main-sequence star with a mass of ~0.75 Msun and a radius of ~0.8 Rsun, would fill its Roche lobe for a P=0.29585 day orbital period and a more massive WD companion.
  • The 2012 explosion of SN2009ip raises questions about our understanding of the late stages of massive star evolution. Here we present a comprehensive study of SN2009ip during its remarkable re-brightening(s). High-cadence photometric and spectroscopic observations from the GeV to the radio band obtained from a variety of ground-based and space facilities (including the VLA, Swift, Fermi, HST and XMM) constrain SN2009ip to be a low energy (E~ 10^50 erg for an ejecta mass ~ 0.5 Msun) and likely asymmetric explosion in a complex medium shaped by multiple eruptions of the restless progenitor star. Most of the energy is radiated as a result of the shock breaking out through a dense shell of material located at 5x10^14 cm with M~0.1 Msun, ejected by the precursor outburst ~40 days before the major explosion. We interpret the NIR excess of emission as signature of dust vaporization of material located further out (R>4x 10^15 cm), the origin of which has to be connected with documented mass loss episodes in the previous years. Our modeling predicts bright neutrino emission associated with the shock break-out if the cosmic ray energy is comparable to the radiated energy. We connect this phenomenology with the explosive ejection of the outer layers of the massive progenitor star, that later interacted with material deposited in the surroundings by previous eruptions. Future observations will reveal if the luminous blue variable (LBV) progenitor star survived. Irrespective of whether the explosion was terminal, SN2009ip brought to light the existence of new channels for sustained episodic mass-loss, the physical origin of which has yet to be identified.
  • We report on our discovery and observations of the Pan-STARRS1 supernova (SN) PS1-12sk, a transient with properties that indicate atypical star formation in its host galaxy cluster or pose a challenge to popular progenitor system models for this class of explosion. The optical spectra of PS1-12sk classify it as a Type Ibn SN (c.f. SN 2006jc), dominated by intermediate-width (3x10^3 km/s) and time variable He I emission. Our multi-wavelength monitoring establishes the rise time dt = 9-23 days and shows an NUV-NIR SED with temperature > 17x10^3 K and a peak rise magnitude of Mz = -18.9 mag. SN Ibn spectroscopic properties are commonly interpreted as the signature of a massive star (17 - 100 M_sun) explosion within a He-enriched circumstellar medium. However, unlike previous Type Ibn supernovae, PS1-12sk is associated with an elliptical brightest cluster galaxy, CGCG 208-042 (z = 0.054) in cluster RXC J0844.9+4258. The expected probability of an event like PS1-12sk in such environments is low given the measured infrequency of core-collapse SNe in red sequence galaxies compounded by the low volumetric rate of SN Ibn. Furthermore, we find no evidence of star formation at the explosion site to sensitive limits (Sigma Halpha < 2x10^-3 M_sun/yr/kpc^2). We therefore discuss white dwarf binary systems as a possible progenitor channel for SNe Ibn. We conclude that PS1-12sk represents either a fortuitous and statistically unlikely discovery, evidence for a top-heavy IMF in galaxy cluster cooling flow filaments, or the first clue suggesting an alternate progenitor channel for Type Ibn SNe.
  • We present the Pan-STARRS1 discovery of PS1-10afx, a unique hydrogen-deficient superluminous supernova (SLSN) at z=1.388. The light curve peaked at z_P1=21.7 mag, making PS1-10afx comparable to the most luminous known SNe, with M_u = -22.3 mag. Our extensive optical and NIR observations indicate that the bolometric light curve of PS1-10afx rose on the unusually fast timescale of ~12 d to the extraordinary peak luminosity of 4.1e44 erg/s (M_bol = -22.8 mag) and subsequently faded rapidly. Equally important, the SED is unusually red for a SLSN, with a color temperature of 6800 K near maximum light, in contrast to previous H-poor SLSNe, which are bright in the UV. The spectra more closely resemble those of a normal SN Ic than any known SLSN, with a photospheric velocity of 11,000 km/s and evidence for line blanketing in the rest-frame UV. Despite the fast rise, these parameters imply a very large emitting radius (>5e15 cm). We demonstrate that no existing theoretical model can satisfactorily explain this combination of properties: (i) a nickel-powered light curve cannot match the combination of high peak luminosity with the fast timescale; (ii) models powered by the spindown energy of a rapidly-rotating magnetar predict significantly hotter and faster ejecta; and (iii) models invoking shock breakout through a dense circumstellar medium cannot explain the observed spectra or color evolution. The host galaxy is well detected in pre-explosion imaging with a luminosity near L*, a star formation rate of 15 M_sun/yr, and is fairly massive (2e10 M_sun), with a stellar population age of 1e8 yr, also in contrast to the dwarf hosts of known H-poor SLSNe. PS1-10afx is distinct from known examples of SLSNe in its spectra, colors, light-curve shape, and host galaxy properties, suggesting that it resulted from a different channel than other hydrogen-poor SLSNe.
  • We present X-ray, UV/optical, and radio observations of the stripped-envelope, core-collapse supernova (SN) 2011ei, one of the least luminous SNe IIb or Ib observed to date. Our observations begin with a discovery within 1 day of explosion and span several months afterward. Early optical spectra exhibit broad, Type II-like hydrogen Balmer profiles that subside rapidly and are replaced by Type Ib-like He-rich features on the timescale of one week. High-cadence monitoring of this transition suggests that absorption attributable to a high velocity (> 12,000 km/s) H-rich shell is not rare in Type Ib events. Radio observations imply a shock velocity of v = 0.13c and a progenitor star mass-loss rate of 1.4 x 10^{-5} Msun yr^{-1} (assuming wind velocity v_w=10^3 km/s). This is consistent with independent constraints from deep X-ray observations with Swift-XRT and Chandra. Overall, the multi-wavelength properties of SN 2011ei are consistent with the explosion of a lower-mass (3-4 Msun), compact (R* <= 1x10^{11} cm), He core star. The star retained a thin hydrogen envelope at the time of explosion, and was embedded in an inhomogeneous circumstellar wind suggestive of modest episodic mass-loss. We conclude that SN 2011ei's rapid spectral metamorphosis is indicative of time-dependent classifications that bias estimates of explosion rates for Type IIb and Ib objects, and that important information about a progenitor star's evolutionary state and mass-loss immediately prior to SN explosion can be inferred from timely multi-wavelength observations.
  • We report the discovery and detailed monitoring of X-ray emission associated with the Type IIb SN 2011dh using data from the Swift and Chandra satellites, placing it among the best studied X-ray supernovae to date. We further present millimeter and radio data obtained with the SMA, CARMA, and EVLA during the first three weeks after explosion. Combining these observations with early optical photometry, we show that the panchromatic dataset is well-described by non-thermal synchrotron emission (radio/mm) with inverse Compton scattering (X-ray) of a thermal population of optical photons. In this scenario, the shock partition fractions deviate from equipartition by a factor, (e_e/e_B) ~ 30. We derive the properties of the shockwave and the circumstellar environment and find a shock velocity, v~0.1c, and a progenitor mass loss rate of ~6e-5 M_sun/yr. These properties are consistent with the sub-class of Type IIb SNe characterized by compact progenitors (Type cIIb) and dissimilar from those with extended progenitors (Type eIIb). Furthermore, we consider the early optical emission in the context of a cooling envelope model to estimate a progenitor radius of ~1e+11 cm, in line with the expectations for a Type cIIb SN. Together, these diagnostics are difficult to reconcile with the extended radius of the putative yellow supergiant progenitor star identified in archival HST observations, unless the stellar density profile is unusual. Finally, we searched for the high energy shock breakout pulse using X-ray and gamma-ray observations obtained during the purported explosion date range. Based on the compact radius of the progenitor, we estimate that the breakout pulse was detectable with current instruments but likely missed due to their limited temporal/spatial coverage. [Abridged]
  • The flare of radiation from the tidal disruption and accretion of a star can be used as a marker for supermassive black holes that otherwise lie dormant and undetected in the centres of distant galaxies. Previous candidate flares have had declining light curves in good agreement with expectations, but with poor constraints on the time of disruption and the type of star disrupted, because the rising emission was not observed. Recently, two `relativistic' candidate tidal disruption events were discovered, each of whose extreme X-ray luminosity and synchrotron radio emission were interpreted as the onset of emission from a relativistic jet. Here we report the discovery of a luminous ultraviolet-optical flare from the nuclear region of an inactive galaxy at a redshift of 0.1696. The observed continuum is cooler than expected for a simple accreting debris disk, but the well-sampled rise and decline of its light curve follows the predicted mass accretion rate, and can be modelled to determine the time of disruption to an accuracy of two days. The black hole has a mass of about 2 million solar masses, modulo a factor dependent on the mass and radius of the star disrupted. On the basis of the spectroscopic signature of ionized helium from the unbound debris, we determine that the disrupted star was a helium-rich stellar core.