• Artificial magnetic honeycomb lattices are expected to exhibit a broad and tunable range of novel magnetic phenomena that would be difficult to achieve in natural materials, such as long-range spin ice, entropy-driven magnetic charge-ordered state and spin-order due to the spin chirality. Eventually, the spin correlation is expected to develop into a unique spin solid state density ground state, manifested by the distribution of the pairs of vortex states of opposite chirality. Here we report the creation of a new artificial permalloy honeycomb lattice of ultra-small connecting bonds, with a typical size of $\simeq$ 12 nm. Detail magnetic and neutron scattering measurements on the newly fabricated honeycomb lattice demonstrate the evolution of magnetic correlation as a function of temperature. At low enough temperature, neutron scattering measurements and micromagnetic simulation suggest the development of loop state of vortex configuration in this system.
  • The magnetic field induced rearrangement of the cycloidal spin structure in ferroelectric mono-domain single crystals of the room-temperature multiferroic BiFeO$_3$ is studied using small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). The cycloid propagation vectors are observed to rotate when magnetic fields applied perpendicular to the rhombohedral (polar) axis exceed a pinning threshold value of $\sim$5\,T. In light of these experimental results, a phenomenological model is proposed that captures the rearrangement of the cycloidal domains, and we revisit the microscopic origin of the magnetoelectric effect. A new coupling between the magnetic anisotropy and the polarization is proposed that explains the recently discovered magnetoelectric polarization to the rhombohedral axis.
  • Structure and composition of iron chalcogenides have a delicate relationship with magnetism and superconductivity. In this report we investigate the iron sulfide layered tetragonal phase (t-FeS), and compare with three-dimensional hexagonal phase (h-FeS). X-ray diffraction reveals the absence of structural transitions for both t- and h-FeS below room temperature, and gives phase compositions of Fe0.93(1)S and Fe0.84(1)S, respectively, for the samples studied here. The a lattice parameter of bigger than 3.68 A is significant for causing bulk superconductivity in iron sulfide, which is controlled by composition and structural details such as iron stoichiometry and concentration of vacancy. While h-FeS with a = 3.4436(1) A has magnetic ordering well above room temperature, our t-FeS with a =3.6779(8)A shows filamentary superconductivity below Tc = 4 K with less than 15% superconducting volume fraction. Also for t-FeS, the magnetic susceptibility shows an anomaly at ~ 15 K, and neutron diffraction reveals a commensurate antiferromagnetic ordering below TN = 116 K, with wave vector km= (0.25,0.25,0) and 0.46(2)uB/Fe. Although two synthesis routes are used here to stabilize t vs h crystal structures (hydrothermal vs solid-state methods), both FeS compounds order on two length-scales of ~1000 nm sheets or blocks and ~ 20 nm smaller particles, shown by neutron scattering. First principles calculations reveal a high sensitivity to the structure for the electronic and magnetic properties in t-FeS, predicting marginal antiferromagnetic instability for our compound (sulfur height of zS ~0.252) with an ordering energy of ~11 meV/Fe, while h-FeS is magnetically stable.
  • Using inelastic neutron scattering, we map a 14 meV coherent resonant mode in the topological Kondo insulator SmB6 and describe its relation to the low energy insulating band structure. The resonant intensity is confined to the X and R high symmetry points, repeating outside the first Brillouin zone and dispersing less than 2 meV, with a 5d-like magnetic form factor. We present a slave-boson treatment of the Anderson Hamiltonian with a third neighbor dominated hybridized band structure. This approach produces a spin exciton below the charge gap with features that are consistent with the observed neutron scattering. We find that maxima in the wave vector dependence of the inelastic neutron scattering indicate band inversion.
  • We present inelastic neutron scattering and magnetization measurements of the antiferromagnetic insulator LaMnPO that are well described by a Heisenberg spin model. These measurements are consistent with the presence of two-dimensional magnetic correlations up to a temperature T$_{max}$ $\approx$ 700 K >> T$_{N}$ = 375 K, the N\'eel temperature. Optical transmission measurements show the T = 300 K direct charge gap $\Delta$ = 1 eV has decreased only marginally by 500 K and suggest it decreases by only 10% at T$_{max}$. Density functional theory and dynamical mean field theory calculations reproduce a direct charge gap in paramagnetic LaMnPO only when a strong Hund's coupling J$_{H}$ = 0.9 eV is included, as well as onsite Hubbard U = 8 eV. These results show the direct charge gap in LaMnPO is rather insensitive to antiferromagnetic exchange coupling and instead is a result of the local physics governed by U and J$_{H}$.
  • The vortex lattice (VL) symmetry and orientation in clean type-II superconductors depends sensitively on the host material anisotropy, vortex density and temperature, frequently leading to rich phase diagrams. Typically, a well-ordered VL is taken to imply a ground state configuration for the vortex-vortex interaction. Using neutron scattering we studied the VL in MgB2 for a number of field-temperature histories, discovering an unprecedented degree of metastability in connection with a known, second-order rotation transition. This allows, for the first time, structural studies of a well-ordered, non-equilibrium VL. While the mechanism responsible for the longevity of the metastable states is not resolved, we speculate it is due to a jamming of VL domains, preventing a rotation to the ground state orientation.
  • From small-angle neutron scattering studies of the flux line lattice (FLL) in CeCoIn5, with magnetic field applied parallel to the crystal c-axis, we obtain the field- and temperature-dependence of the FLL form factor, which is a measure of the spatial variation of the field in the mixed state. We extend our earlier work [A.D. Bianchi et al. 2008 Science 319, 177] to temperatures up to 1250 mK. Over the entire temperature range, paramagnetism in the flux line cores results in an increase of the form factor with field. Near H_c2 the form factor decreases again, and our results indicate that this fall-off extends outside the proposed FFLO region. Instead, we attribute the decrease to a paramagnetic suppression of Cooper pairing. At higher temperatures, a gradual crossover towards more conventional mixed state behavior is observed.
  • We present studies of the magnetic field distribution around the vortices in LuNi2B2C. Small-angle neutron scattering measurements of the vortex lattice (VL) in this material were extended to unprecedentedly large values of the scattering vector q, obtained both by using high magnetic fields to decrease the VL spacing and by using higher order reflections. A square VL, oriented with the nearest neighbor direction along the crystalline [110] direction, was observed up to the highest measured field. The first-order VL form factor, |F(q10)|, was found to decrease exponentially with increasing magnetic field. Measurements of the higher order form factors, |F(qhk)|, reveal a significant in-plane anisotropy and also allow for a real-space reconstruction of the VL field distribution.
  • The magnetic field distribution around the vortices in TmNi2B2C in the paramagnetic phase was studied experimentally as well as theoretically. The vortex form factor, measured by small-angle neutron scattering, is found to be field independent up to 0.6 Hc2 followed by a sharp decrease at higher fields. The data are fitted well by solutions to the Eilenberger equations when paramagnetic effects due to the exchange interaction with the localized 4f Tm moments are included. The induced paramagnetic moments around the vortex cores act to maintain the field contrast probed by the form factor.
  • Using small-angle neutron scattering, we have studied the flux-line lattice (FLL) in superconducting CeCoIn5. The FLL is found to undergo a first-order symmetry and reorientation transition at ~0.55 T at 50 mK. The FLL form factor in this material is found to be independent of the applied magnetic field, in striking contrast to the exponential decrease usually observed in superconductors. This result is consistent with a strongly field-dependent coherence length in CeCoIn5, in agreement with recent theoretical predictions for superclean, high-kappa superconductors.
  • Using small-angle neutron scattering we have measured the misalignment between an applied field of 4 kOe and the flux-line lattice in MgB$_2$, as the field is rotated away from the c axis by an angle $\theta$. The measurements, performed at 4.9 K, showed the vortices canting towards the c axis for all field orientations. Using a two-band/two-gap model to calculate the magnetization we are able to fit our results yielding a penetration depth anisotropy, $\glam = 1.1 \pm 0.1$.