• We present a new accurate catalog of narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxies (NLS1s) in the southern hemisphere from the Six-degree Field Galaxy Survey (6dFGS) final data release, which is currently the most extensive spectroscopic survey available in the southern sky whose database has not yet been systematically explored. We classified 167 sources as NLS1s based on their optical spectral properties. We derived flux-calibrated spectra for the first time that the 6dFGS indeed does not provide. By analyzing these spectra, we obtained strong correlations between the monochromatic luminosity at 5100 A and the luminosity of Hbeta and [O III]5007 lines. The estimated central black hole mass and Eddington ratio have an average value of 0.86 x 10^7 M_Sun and 0.96 L_Edd respectively, which is a typical value for NLS1s. In the sample, 23 (13.8%) NLS1s were detected at radio frequencies, and 12 (7.0%) of them are radio-loud. Our results confirmed that radio-loud sources tend to have higher redshift, more massive black hole, and higher radio and optical luminosity than radio-quiet sources.
  • A. De Angelis, V. Tatischeff, I. A. Grenier, J. McEnery, M. Mallamaci, M. Tavani, U. Oberlack, L. Hanlon, R. Walter, A. Argan, P. Von Ballmoos, A. Bulgarelli, A. Bykov, M. Hernanz, G. Kanbach, I. Kuvvetli, M. Pearce, A. Zdziarski, J. Conrad, G. Ghisellini, A. Harding, J. Isern, M. Leising, F. Longo, G. Madejski, M. Martinez, M. N. Mazziotta, J. M. Paredes, M. Pohl, R. Rando, M. Razzano, A. Aboudan, M. Ackermann, A. Addazi, M. Ajello, C. Albertus, J. M. Alvarez, G. Ambrosi, S. Anton, L. A. Antonelli, A. Babic, B. Baibussinov, M. Balbo, L. Baldini, S. Balman, C. Bambi, U. Barres de Almeida, J. A. Barrio, R. Bartels, D. Bastieri, W. Bednarek, D. Bernard, E. Bernardini, T. Bernasconi, B. Bertucci, A. Biland, E. Bissaldi, M. Boettcher, V. Bonvicini, V. Bosch Ramon, E. Bottacini, V. Bozhilov, T. Bretz, M. Branchesi, V. Brdar, T. Bringmann, A. Brogna, C. Budtz Jorgensen, G. Busetto, S. Buson, M. Busso, A. Caccianiga, S. Camera, R. Campana, P. Caraveo, M. Cardillo, P. Carlson, S. Celestin, M. Cermeno, A. Chen, C. C Cheung, E. Churazov, S. Ciprini, A. Coc, S. Colafrancesco, A. Coleiro, W. Collmar, P. Coppi, R. Curado da Silva, S. Cutini, F. DAmmando, B. De Lotto, D. de Martino, A. De Rosa, M. Del Santo, L. Delgado, R. Diehl, S. Dietrich, A. D. Dolgov, A. Dominguez, D. Dominis Prester, I. Donnarumma, D. Dorner, M. Doro, M. Dutra, D. Elsaesser, M. Fabrizio, A. FernandezBarral, V. Fioretti, L. Foffano, V. Formato, N. Fornengo, L. Foschini, A. Franceschini, A. Franckowiak, S. Funk, F. Fuschino, D. Gaggero, G. Galanti, F. Gargano, D. Gasparrini, R. Gehrz, P. Giammaria, N. Giglietto, P. Giommi, F. Giordano, M. Giroletti, G. Ghirlanda, N. Godinovic, C. Gouiffes, J. E. Grove, C. Hamadache, D. H. Hartmann, M. Hayashida, A. Hryczuk, P. Jean, T. Johnson, J. Jose, S. Kaufmann, B. Khelifi, J. Kiener, J. Knodlseder, M. Kole, J. Kopp, V. Kozhuharov, C. Labanti, S. Lalkovski, P. Laurent, O. Limousin, M. Linares, E. Lindfors, M. Lindner, J. Liu, S. Lombardi, F. Loparco, R. LopezCoto, M. Lopez Moya, B. Lott, P. Lubrano, D. Malyshev, N. Mankuzhiyil, K. Mannheim, M. J. Marcha, A. Marciano, B. Marcote, M. Mariotti, M. Marisaldi, S. McBreen, S. Mereghetti, A. Merle, R. Mignani, G. Minervini, A. Moiseev, A. Morselli, F. Moura, K. Nakazawa, L. Nava, D. Nieto, M. Orienti, M. Orio, E. Orlando, P. Orleanski, S. Paiano, R. Paoletti, A. Papitto, M. Pasquato, B. Patricelli, M. A. PerezGarcia, M. Persic, G. Piano, A. Pichel, M. Pimenta, C. Pittori, T. Porter, J. Poutanen, E. Prandini, N. Prantzos, N. Produit, S. Profumo, F. S. Queiroz, S. Raino, A. Raklev, M. Regis, I. Reichardt, Y. Rephaeli, J. Rico, W. Rodejohann, G. Rodriguez Fernandez, M. Roncadelli, L. Roso, A. Rovero, R. Ruffini, G. Sala, M. A. SanchezConde, A. Santangelo, P. Saz Parkinson, T. Sbarrato, A. Shearer, R. Shellard, K. Short, T. Siegert, C. Siqueira, P. Spinelli, A. Stamerra, S. Starrfield, A. Strong, I. Strumke, F. Tavecchio, R. Taverna, T. Terzic, D. J. Thompson, O. Tibolla, D. F. Torres, R. Turolla, A. Ulyanov, A. Ursi, A. Vacchi, J. Van den Abeele, G. Vankova Kirilovai, C. Venter, F. Verrecchia, P. Vincent, X. Wang, C. Weniger, X. Wu, G. Zaharijas, L. Zampieri, S. Zane, S. Zimmer, A. Zoglauer, the eASTROGAM collaboration
    e-ASTROGAM (enhanced ASTROGAM) is a breakthrough Observatory space mission, with a detector composed by a Silicon tracker, a calorimeter, and an anticoincidence system, dedicated to the study of the non-thermal Universe in the photon energy range from 0.3 MeV to 3 GeV - the lower energy limit can be pushed to energies as low as 150 keV for the tracker, and to 30 keV for calorimetric detection. The mission is based on an advanced space-proven detector technology, with unprecedented sensitivity, angular and energy resolution, combined with polarimetric capability. Thanks to its performance in the MeV-GeV domain, substantially improving its predecessors, e-ASTROGAM will open a new window on the non-thermal Universe, making pioneering observations of the most powerful Galactic and extragalactic sources, elucidating the nature of their relativistic outflows and their effects on the surroundings. With a line sensitivity in the MeV energy range one to two orders of magnitude better than previous generation instruments, e-ASTROGAM will determine the origin of key isotopes fundamental for the understanding of supernova explosion and the chemical evolution of our Galaxy. The mission will provide unique data of significant interest to a broad astronomical community, complementary to powerful observatories such as LIGO-Virgo-GEO600-KAGRA, SKA, ALMA, E-ELT, TMT, LSST, JWST, Athena, CTA, IceCube, KM3NeT, and LISA.
  • We report simultaneous observations at different energy bands in radio, optical, UV, X-rays and $\gamma$ rays of the flat-spectrum radio-quasar 3C 345. We built the light curve of the source at different frequencies from 2008, the beginning of the \textit{Fermi} all-sky survey, to 2016, using new data and public archives. In particular we obtained several optical spectra, to study the behavior of emission lines and the continuum in different activity states and to derive the black hole mass. 3C 345 showed two flaring episodes in 2009, which occurred simultaneously in $\gamma$ ray, optical/UV and X-rays, and were later followed in radio. The source shows an inverse Compton dominated spectral energy distribution, which moved from higher to lower frequencies from the high to the low state. The reverberation of emission lines during one outburst event allowed us to constrain the location of production of $\gamma$ rays very close to the broad-line region, and possibly in the jet-base. We report the observation of an increased accretion after the outburst, possibly induced by the decrease of magnetic field intensity with respect to the low state.
  • We report the first results of a survey on 74 narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxies (NLS1s) carried out in 2015 with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (JVLA) at 5 GHz in A-configuration. So far, this is the largest survey aimed to image the radio continuum of NLS1s. We produced radio maps in order to compare the general properties of three different samples of objects: radio-quiet NLS1s (RQNLS1s), steep-spectrum radio-loud NLS1s (S-NLS1s), and flat-spectrum radio-loud NLS1s (F-NLS1s). We find that the three classes correspond to different radio morphologies, with F-NLS1s being more compact, and RQNLS1s often showing diffuse emission on kpc scales. We also find that F-NLS1s might be low-luminosity and possibly young blazars, and that S-NLS1s are part of the parent population of F-NLS1s. Dedicated studies to RQNLS1s are needed in order to fully understand their role in the unification pictures.
  • We present the first results of a radio survey of 79 narrow-line Seyfert 1 (NLS1) carried out with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (JVLA) at 5 GHz in A configuration aimed at studying the radio properties of these sources. We report the detection of extended emission in one object: Mrk 783. This is intriguing, since the radio-loudness parameter R of this object is close to the threshold between radio-quiet and radio-loud active galactic nuclei (AGN). The galaxy is one of the few NLS1 showing such an extended emission at z < 0.1. The radio emission is divided in a compact core component and an extended component, observed on both sides of the nucleus and extending from 14 kpc south-east to 12 kpc north-west. There is no sign of a collimated jet, and the shape of the extended component is similar to those of some Seyfert galaxies. The properties of the emission are compatible with a relic produced by the intermittent activity cycle of the AGN.
  • We have conducted a multiwavelength survey of 42 radio loud narrow-1ine Seyfert 1 galaxies (RLNLS1s), selected by searching among all the known sources of this type and omitting those with steep radio spectra. We analyse data from radio frequencies to X-rays, and supplement these with information available from online catalogs and the literature in order to cover the full electromagnetic spectrum. This is the largest known multiwavelength survey for this type of source. We detected 90% of the sources in X-rays and found 17% at gamma rays. Extreme variability at high energies was also found, down to timescales as short as hours. In some sources, dramatic spectral and flux changes suggest interplay between a relativistic jet and the accretion disk. The estimated masses of the central black holes are in the range $\sim 10^{6-8}M_{\odot}$, smaller than those of blazars, while the accretion luminosities span a range from $\sim 0.01$ to $\sim 0.49$ times the Eddington limit, similar to those of quasars. The distribution of the calculated jet power spans a range from $\sim 10^{42.6}$ to $\sim 10^{45.6}$ erg s$^{-1}$, generally lower than quasars and BL Lac objects, but partially overlapping with the latter. Once normalised by the mass of the central black holes, the jet power of the three types of active galactic nuclei are consistent with each other, indicating the scalability of the jet. Despite the observational differences, the central engine of RLNLS1s is apparently quite similar to that of blazars. The historical difficulties in finding radio-loud narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxies might be due to their low power and to intermittent jet activity.
  • Blazars are the most luminous and variable AGNs, and thus excellent probes of accretion and emission processes close to the central engine. We focus on PKS 1510-089 ($z=0.36$), one of the brightest gamma-ray sources in the Fermi LAT catalog, to study its complex multi-wavelength variability. PKS 1510-089 was observed twice in hard X-rays with the IBIS instrument onboard INTEGRAL during the flares of Jan 2009 and Jan 2010, and simultaneously with Swift and NOT, in addition to the constant Fermi monitoring. The optical polarization was measured in several bands on 18 Jan 2010 at the NOT. Using our and archival data we constructed historical light curves at gamma-to-radio wavelengths covering nearly 20 years and applied variability tests. We assembled SEDs in 2009 and 2010 and compared them with those at two previous epochs and with a model based on synchrotron and inverse Compton (IC) radiation. The SED modeling suggests that the physical quantities that undergo the largest variations are the total power injected into the emitting region and the random Lorentz factor of the electron distribution cooling break, that are higher in the higher gamma-ray states. This suggests a correlation of the injected power with enhanced activity of the acceleration mechanism. The cooling likely takes place at a much smaller distance ($\sim$0.03 pc) than the BLR radius. The emission at a few hundred GeV can be reproduced with IC scattering of highly relativistic electrons off FIR photons at $\sim$0.2 pc, presumably in a dusty torus. DCF analysis between the long-term optical and gamma-ray light curves yields a good correlation with no measurable delay. Our time analysis of the RXTE PCA and Fermi LAT light curves reveals no obvious (quasi-)periodicities, up to the maximum time scale (a few years) probed by the light curves, which are severely affected by red noise.
  • We revisited the spectroscopic characteristics of narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxies (NLS1s) by analysing a homogeneous sample of 296 NLS1s at redshift between 0.028 and 0.345, extracted from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-DR7) public archive. We confirm that NLS1s are mostly characterized by Balmer lines with Lorentzian profiles, lower black hole masses and higher Eddington ratios than classic broad-line Seyfert 1 (BLS1s), but they also appear to be active galactic nuclei (AGNs) contiguous with BLS1s and sharing with them common properties. Strong Fe II emission does not seem to be a distinctive property of NLS1s, as low values of Fe II/H$\beta$ are equally observed in these AGNs. Our data indicate that Fe II and Ca II kinematics are consistent with the one of H$\beta$. On the contrary, O I $\lambda$8446 seems to be systematically narrower and it is likely emitted by gas of the broad-line region more distant from the ionizing source and showing different physical properties. Finally, almost all NLS1s of our sample show radial motions of the narrow-line region highly-ionised gas. The mechanism responsible for this effect is not yet clear, but there are hints that very fast outflows require high continuum luminosities (> $10^{44}$ erg/s) or high Eddington ratios (log(L$_{\rm bol}$/L$_{\rm Edd}$) > -0.1).
  • The [O III] $\lambda\lambda$ 4959,5007 lines are a useful proxy to test the kinematic of the narrow-line region (NLR) in active galactic nuclei (AGN). In AGN, and particularly in narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxies (NLS1s) these lines often show few peculiar features, such as blue wings, often interpreted as outflowing component, and a shift $-$ typically toward lower wavelengths $-$ of the whole spectroscopic feature in some exceptional sources, the so-called blue outliers, which are often associated to strong winds. We investigated the incidence of these peculiarities in two samples of radio-emitting NLS1s, one radio-loud and one radio-quiet. We also studied a few correlations between the observational properties of the [O III] lines and those of the AGN. Our aim was to understand the difference between radio-quiet and radio-loud NLS1s, which may in turn provide useful information on the jet formation mechanism. We find that the NLR gas is much more perturbed in radio-loud than in radio-quiet NLS1s. In particular the NLR dynamics in $\gamma$-ray emitting NLS1s appears to be highly disturbed, and this might be a consequence of interaction with the relativistic jet. The less frequently perturbed NLR in radio-quiet NLS1s suggests instead that these sources likely do not harbor a fully developed relativistic jet. Nonetheless blue-outliers in radio-quiet NLS1s are observed, and we interpret them as a product of strong winds.
  • Narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxies (NLS1s) are active galactic nuclei (AGN) recently identified as a new class of $\gamma$-ray sources. The high energy emission is explained by the presence of a relativistic jet observed at small angles, just like in the case of blazars. When the latter are observed at larger angles they appear as radio-galaxies, but an analogue parent population for beamed NLS1s has not yet been determined. In this work we analyze this problem by studying the physical properties of three different samples of parent sources candidates: steep-spectrum radio-loud NLS1s, radio-quiet NLS1s, and disk-hosted radio-galaxies, along with compact steep-spectrum sources. In our approach, we first derived black hole mass and Eddington ratio from the optical spectra, then we investigated the interaction between the jet and the narrow-line region from the [O III] $\lambda\lambda$4959,5007 lines. Finally, the radio luminosity function allowed us to compare their jet luminosity and hence determine the relations between the samples.
  • We report about recent updates of broad-band properties of radio-loud narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxies.
  • Narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxies (NLS1) are active galactic nuclei (AGN) known to have small masses of the central black hole and high accretion rates. NLS1s are generally radio-quiet, but a small part of them (about 7\%) are radio-loud. The recent discovery of powerful relativistic jets in radio-loud NLS1s (RLNLS1s), emitting at high-energy $\gamma$-rays, opened intriguing questions. The observed luminosity of the jet is generally weak, smaller than blazars, although when rescaled for the mass of the central black hole, it becomes of the same order of magnitude of the latter. The weak luminosity, and hence observed flux, resulted in a small number of known RLNLS1. From a recent survey of RLNLS1s, it was found that only 8 out of 42 sources had radio flux density at 1.4 GHz greater than 100 mJy, while 21 out of 42 had flux density smaller than 10 mJy. In addition, given the strong variability at all wavelengths, with present-day facilities RLNLS1s can often only be detected during high activity periods. The Square Kilometer Array (SKA), with its superior sensitivity, will break this limit, allowing us to unveil a relatively unknown population of jetted AGN. We present the results of a study aimed at evaluating the scenario that could emerge after the advent of SKA.
  • The aim of this work is to understand the nature of the parent population of beamed narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxies (NLS1s), by studying the physical properties of three parent candidates samples: steep-spectrum radio-loud NLS1s, radio-quiet NLS1s and disk-hosted radio-galaxies. In particular, we focused on the black hole mass and Eddington ratio distribution and on the interactions between the jet and the narrow-line region.
  • We report on a multiwavelength survey of a sample of 42 flat-spectrum radio-loud narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxies (RLNLS1s). This is the largest known sample of this type of active galactic nucleus (AGN) to date. We found that 17% of sources were detected at high-energy gamma rays (E>100 MeV), and 90% at X-rays (0.3-10 keV). The masses of the central black holes are in the range $\sim 10^{6-8}M_{\odot}$, smaller than the values of blazars. The disk luminosities are about 1-49% of the Eddington value, with one outlier at 0.3%, comparable with the luminosities observed in flat-spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs). The jet powers are $\sim 10^{42-46}$ erg s$^{-1}$, comparable with BL Lac Objects, yet relatively smaller than FSRQs. However, once renormalized by the mass of the central black hole, the jet powers of RLNLS1s, BL Lacs, and FSRQs are consistent each other, indicating the scalability of the jets. We found episodes of extreme variability at high energies on time scales of hours. In some cases, dramatic spectral and flux changes are interpreted as the interplay between the relativistic jet and the accretion disk. We conclude that, despite the distinct observational properties, the central engines of RLNLS1s are similar to those of blazars.
  • Minimization of charged particle background in X-ray telescopes is a well known issue. Charged particles (chiefly protons and electrons) naturally present in the cosmic environment constitute an important background source when they collide with the X-ray detector. Even worse, a serious degradation of spectroscopic performances of the X-ray detector was observed in Chandra and Newton-XMM, caused by soft protons with kinetic energies ranging between 100 keV and some MeV being collected by the grazing-incidence mirrors and funneled to the detector. For a focusing telescope like SIMBOL-X, the exposure of the soft X-ray detector to the proton flux can increase significantly the instrumental background, with a consequent loss of sensitivity. In the worst case, it can also seriously compromise the detector duration. A well-known countermeasure that can be adopted is the implementation of a properly-designed magnetic diverter, that should prevent high-energy particles from reaching the focal plane instruments of SIMBOL-X. Although Newton-XMM and Swift-XRT are equipped with magnetic diverters for electrons, the magnetic fields used are insufficient to effectively act on protons. In this paper, we simulate the behavior of a magnetic diverter for SIMBOL-X, consisting of commercially-available permanent magnets. The effects of SIMBOL-X optics is simulated through GEANT4 libraries, whereas the effect of the intense required magnetic fields is simulated along with specifically-written numerical codes in IDL.
  • We investigate the mid-infrared properties of the largest (42 objects) sample of radio-loud narrow-line Seyfert 1 (RL NLS1) collected to date, using data from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE). We analyse the mid-IR colours of these objects and compare them to what is expected from different combinations of AGN and galaxy templates. We find that, in general, the host-galaxy emission gives an importan contribution to the observed mid-IR flux in particular at the longest wavelengths (W3, at 12micron, and W4, at 22micron). In about half of the sources (22 objects) we observe a very red mid-IR colour (W4-W3>2.5) that can be explained only using a starburst galaxy template (M82). Using the 22micron luminosities, corrected for the AGN contribution, we have then estimated the star-formation rate for 20 of these "red" RL NLS1, finding values ranging from 10 to 500 Msun/y. For the RL NLS1 showing bluer colours, instead, we cannot exclude the presence of a star-forming host galaxy although, on average, we expect a lower star-formation rate. Studying the radio (1.4GHz) to mid-IR (22micron) flux ratios of the RL NLS1 in the sample we found that in ~10 objects the star-forming activity could represent the most important component also at radio frequencies, in addition (or in alternative) to the relativistic jet. We conclude that both the mid-IR and the radio emission of RL NLS1 are a mixture of different components, including the relativistic jet, the dusty torus and an intense star-forming activity.
  • Blazars are astrophysical sources whose emission is dominated by non-thermal processes, typically interpreted as synchrotron and inverse Compton emission. Although the general picture is rather robust and consistent with observations, many aspects are still unexplored. Polarimetric monitoring can offer a wealth of information about the physical processes in blazars. Models with largely different physical ingredients can often provide almost indistinguishable predictions for the total flux, but usually are characterized by markedly different polarization properties. We explore, with a pilot study, the possibility to derive structural information about the emitting regions of blazars by means of a joint analysis of rapid variability of the total and polarized flux at optical wavelengths. Short timescale (from tens of seconds to a couple of minutes) optical linear polarimetry and photometry for two blazars, BL Lacertae and PKS 1424+240, was carried out with the PAOLO polarimeter at the 3.6m Telescopio Nazionale Galileo. Several hours of almost continuous observations were obtained for both sources. Our intense monitoring allowed us to draw strongly different scenarios for BL Lacertae and PKS 1424+240, with the former characterized by intense variability on time-scales from hours to a few minutes and the latter practically constant in total flux. Essentially the same behavior is observed for the polarized flux and the position angle. The variability time-scales turned out to be as short as a few minutes, although involving only a few percent variation of the flux. The polarization variability time-scale is generally consistent with the total flux variability. Total and polarized flux appear to be essentially uncorrelated. However, even during our relatively short monitoring, different regimes can be singled out. (abridged)
  • We have selected SDSS J222032.50+002537.5 and SDSS J142048.01+120545.9 as best blazar candidates out of a complete sample of extremely radio-loud quasars at z>4, with highly massive black holes. We observed them and a third serendipitous candidate with similar features (PMN J2134-0419) in the X-rays with the Swift/XRT telescope, to confirm their blazar nature. We observed strong and hard X-ray fluxes (i.e. $\alpha_X<0.6$, where $F(\nu)\propto\nu^{-\alpha_X}$ in the 0.3-10keV observed energy range, ~1-40keV rest frame) in all three cases. This allowed us to classify our candidates as real blazars, being characterized by large Lorentz factors (~13) and very small viewing angles (~3deg). All three sources have black hole masses exceeding 10^9Msun and their classification provides intriguing constraints on supermassive black hole formation and evolution models. We confirm our earlier suggestion that there are different formation epochs of extremely massive black holes hosted in jetted (z~4) and non-jetted systems (z~2.5).
  • We studied the radio emission from four radio-loud and gamma-ray-loud narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxies. The goal was to investigate whether a relativistic jet is operating at the source, and quantify its characteristics. We relied on the most systematic monitoring of such system in the cm and mm radio bands which is conducted with the Effelsberg 100 m and IRAM 30 m telescopes and covers the longest time-baselines and the most radio frequencies to date. We extract variability parameters and compute variability brightness temperatures and Doppler factors. The jet powers were computed from the light curves to estimate the energy output. The dynamics of radio spectral energy distributions were examined to understand the mechanism causing the variability. All the sources display intensive variability that occurs at a pace faster than what is commonly seen in blazars. The flaring events show intensive spectral evolution indicative of shock evolution. The brightness temperatures and Doppler factors are moderate, implying a mildly relativistic jet. The computed jet powers show very energetic flows. The radio polarisation in one case clearly implies a quiescent jet underlying the recursive flaring activity. Despite the generally lower flux densities, the sources appear to show all typical characteristics seen in blazars that are powered by relativistic jets.
  • We present SDSSJ143244.91+301435.3, a new case of radio-loud narrow line Seyfert 1 (RL NLS1) with a relatively high radio power (P1.4GHz=2.1x10^25 W Hz^-1) and large radioloudness parameter (R1.4=600+/-100). The radio source is compact with a linear size below ~1.4 kpc but, contrary to most of the RL NLS1 discovered so far with such a high R1.4, its radio spectrum is very steep (alpha=0.93) and not supporting a 'blazar-like' nature. Both the small mass of the central super-massive black-hole and the high accretion rate relative to the Eddington limit estimated for this object (3.2x10^7 Msun and 0.27, respectively, with a formal error of ~0.4 dex on both quantities) are typical of the class of NLS1. Through a modeling of the spectral energy distribution of the source we have found that the galaxy hosting SDSSJ143244.91+301435.3 is undergoing a quite intense star-formation (SFR=50 Msun y^-1) which, however, is expected to contribute only marginally (~1 per cent) to the observed radio emission. The radio properties of SDSSJ143244.91+301435.3 are remarkably similar to those of compact steep spectrum (CSS) radio sources, a class of AGN mostly composed by young radio galaxies. This may suggest a direct link between these two classes of AGN, with the CSS sources possibly representing the misaligned version (the so-called parent population) of RL NLS1 showing blazar characteristics.
  • The radio-loud quasar SDSS J114657.79+403708.6 at a redshift z=5.0 is one of the most distant radio-loud objects. The IR-optical luminosity and spectrum suggest that its black hole has a very large mass: M=(5+-1)x 1e9 Msun. The radio-loudness (ratio of the radio to optical flux) of the source is large (around 100), suggesting that the source is viewed at small angles from the jet axis, and could be a blazar. The X-ray observations fully confirm this hypothesis, due to the high level and hardness of the flux. This makes SDSS J114657.79+403708.6 the third most distant blazar known, after Q0906+693 (z=5.47) and B2 1023+25 (z=5.3). Among those, SDSS J114657.79+403708.6 has the largest black hole mass, setting interesting constraints on the mass function of heavy (larger than one billion solar masses) black holes at high redshifts.
  • We present the preliminary results of a survey performed with Swift to observe a sample of radio-loud Narrow-Line Seyfert 1 Galaxies (RLNLS1s). Optical-to-X-ray data from Swift are complemented with gamma-ray observations from Fermi/LAT and radio measurements available in the literature. The comparison with a sample of bright Fermi blazars indicates that RLNLS1s seem to be the low-power tail of the distribution.
  • We present Very Large Telescope optical spectroscopy of nine BL Lac objects of unknown redshift belonging to the list of optically selected radio loud BL Lacs candidates. We explore their spectroscopic properties and the possible link with gamma ray emission. From the new observations we determine the redshift of four objects from faint emission lines or from absorption features of the host galaxy. In three cases we find narrow intervening absorptions from which a lower limit to the redshift is inferred. For the remaining two featureless sources, lower limits to the redshift are deduced from the very absence of spectral lines. A search for gamma counterpart emission shows that six out of nine are Fermi gamma-ray emitters with two new detections. Our analysis suggests that most of the BL Lac still lacking of redshift information are most probably located at high redshift.
  • We have reanalyzed the giant outburst of the blazar PKS 1510-089 (z=0.36) that occurred on 2011 October-November. The gamma-ray flux in the 0.1-100 GeV energy range exceeded the value of 10^-5 ph/cm2/s for several days. The peak flux was reached on 2011 October 19, with a value of 4.4 x 10^-5 ph/cm2/s, which in turn corresponds to a luminosity of 2 x 10^49 erg/s. A very short timescale variability was measured. Particularly on 2011 October 18, the flux-doubling time was as short as 20 minutes. This is the shortest variability ever detected in the MeV-GeV energy band. We compared our analysis with two other outbursts observed in 2009 March and 2012 February-March, when the blazar was also detected by HESS and MAGIC to infer information about the emission at hundreds of GeV.
  • The detection of gamma rays from a small number of Narrow Line Seyfert 1 galaxies by the LAT instrument onboard Fermi seriously challenged our understanding of AGN physics. Among the most important findings associated with their discovery has been the realisation that smaller-mass black holes seem to be hosted by these systems. Immediately after their discovery a radio multi- frequency monitoring campaign was initiated to understand their jet radio emission. Here the first results of the campaign are presented. The light curves and some first variability analyses are discussed, showing that the brightness temperatures and Doppler factors are moderate. The phenomenologies are typically blazar-like. The frequency domain on the other hand indicates intense spectral evolution and the variability patterns indicate mechanisms similar to those acting in the jets of BL Lacs and FSRQs. Finally, the linear polarisation also reveals the presence of a quiescent, optically thin jet in certain cases.