• We derive two-dimensional dust attenuation maps at $\sim1~\mathrm{kpc}$ resolution from the UV continuum for ten galaxies on the $z\sim2$ Star-Forming Main Sequence (SFMS). Comparison with IR data shows that 9 out of 10 galaxies do not require further obscuration in addition to the UV-based correction, though our sample does not include the most heavily obscured, massive galaxies. The individual rest-frame $V$-band dust attenuation (A$_{\rm V}$) radial profiles scatter around an average profile that gently decreases from $\sim1.8$ mag in the center down to $\sim0.6$ mag at $\sim3-4$ half-mass radii. We use these maps to correct UV- and H$\alpha$-based star-formation rates (SFRs), which agree with each other. At masses $<10^{11}~M_{\rm sun}$, the dust-corrected specific SFR (sSFR) profiles are on average radially constant at a mass-doubling timescale of $\sim300~\mathrm{Myr}$, pointing at a synchronous growth of bulge and disk components. At masses $>10^{11}~M_{\rm sun}$, the sSFR profiles are typically centrally-suppressed by a factor of $\sim10$ relative to the galaxy outskirts. With total central obscuration disfavored, this indicates that at least a fraction of massive $z\sim2$ SFMS galaxies have started their inside-out star-formation quenching that will move them to the quenched sequence. In combination with other observations, galaxies above and below the ridge of the SFMS relation have respectively centrally-enhanced and centrally-suppressed sSFRs relative to their outskirts, supporting a picture where bulges are built due to gas `compaction' that leads to a high central SFR as galaxies move towards the upper envelope of SFMS.
  • Using integral field spectroscopy we investigate the kinematic properties of 35 massive centrally-dense and compact star-forming galaxies (${\log{\overline{M}_*}}=11.1$, $\log{(\Sigma_\mathrm{1kpc})}>9.5$, $\log{(M_\ast/r_e^{1.5})}>10.3$) at $z\sim0.7-3.7$ within the KMOS$^\mathrm{3D}$survey. We spatially resolve 23 compact star-forming galaxies (SFGs) and find that the majority are dominated by rotational motions with velocities ranging from {$95-500$ km s$^{-1}$}. The range of rotation velocities is reflected in a similar range of integrated H$\alpha$ linewidths, $75-400$ km s$^{-1}$, consistent with the kinematic properties of mass-matched extended galaxies from the full KMOS$^\mathrm{3D}$ sample. The fraction of compact SFGs that are classified as `rotation-dominated' or `disk-like' also mirrors the fractions of the full KMOS$^\mathrm{3D}$ sample. We show that integrated line-of-sight gas velocity dispersions from KMOS$^\mathrm{3D}$ are best approximated by a linear combination of their rotation and turbulent velocities with a lesser but still significant contribution from galactic scale winds. The H$\alpha$ exponential disk sizes of compact SFGs are on average $2.5\pm0.2$ kpc, $1-2\times$ the continuum sizes, in agreement with previous work. The compact SFGs have a $1.4\times$ higher AGN incidence than the full KMOS$^\mathrm{3D}$ sample at fixed stellar mass with average AGN fraction of 76\%. Given their high and centrally concentrated stellar masses as well as stellar to dynamical mass ratios close to unity, the compact SFGs are likely to have low molecular gas fractions and to quench on a short time scale unless replenished with inflowing gas. The rotation in these compact systems suggests that their direct descendants are rotating passive galaxies.
  • We present the "SINS/zC-SINF AO survey" of 35 star-forming galaxies, the largest sample with deep adaptive optics-assisted (AO) near-infrared integral field spectroscopy at z~2. The observations, taken with SINFONI at the Very Large Telescope, resolve the Ha and [NII] line emission and kinematics on scales of ~1.5 kpc. In stellar mass, star formation rate, rest-optical colors and size, the AO sample is representative of its parent seeing-limited sample and probes the massive (M* ~ 2x10^9 - 3x10^11 Msun), actively star-forming (SFR ~ 10-600 Msun/yr) part of the z~2 galaxy population over a wide range in colors ((U-V)_rest ~ 0.15-1.5 mag) and half-light radii (R_e,H ~ 1-8.5 kpc). The sample overlaps largely with the "main sequence" of star-forming galaxies in the same redshift range to a similar K_AB = 23 magnitude limit; it has ~0.3 dex higher median specific SFR, ~0.1 mag bluer median (U-V)_rest color, and ~10% larger median rest-optical size. We describe the observations, data reduction, and extraction of basic flux and kinematic properties. With typically 3-4 times higher resolution and 4-5 times longer integrations (up to 23hr) than the seeing-limited datasets of the same objects, the AO data reveal much more detail in morphology and kinematics. The now complete AO observations confirm the majority of kinematically-classified disks and the typically elevated disk velocity dispersions previously reported based on subsets of the data. We derive typically flat or slightly negative radial [NII]/Ha gradients, with no significant trend with global galaxy properties, kinematic nature, or the presence of an AGN. Azimuthal variations in [NII]/Ha are seen in several sources and are associated with ionized gas outflows, and possible more metal-poor star-forming clumps or small companions. [Abridged]
  • This paper provides an update of our previous scaling relations (Genzel et al.2015) between galaxy integrated molecular gas masses, stellar masses and star formation rates, in the framework of the star formation main-sequence (MS), with the main goal to test for possible systematic effects. For this purpose our new study combines three independent methods of determining molecular gas masses from CO line fluxes, far-infrared dust spectral energy distributions, and ~1mm dust photometry, in a large sample of 1444 star forming galaxies (SFGs) between z=0 and 4. The sample covers the stellar mass range log(M*/M_solar)=9.0-11.8, and star formation rates relative to that on the MS, delta_MS=SFR/SFR(MS), from 10^{-1.3} to 10^{2.2}. Our most important finding is that all data sets, despite the different techniques and analysis methods used, follow the same scaling trends, once method-to-method zero point offsets are minimized and uncertainties are properly taken into account. The molecular gas depletion time t_depl, defined as the ratio of molecular gas mass to star formation rate, scales as (1+z)^{-0.6}x(delta_MS)^{-0.44}, and is only weakly dependent on stellar mass. The ratio of molecular-to-stellar mass mu_gas depends on (1+z)^{2.5}x (delta_MS)^{0.52}x(M*)^{-0.36}, which tracks the evolution of the specific star formation rate. The redshift dependence of mu_gas requires a curvature term, as may the mass-dependences of t_depl and mu_gas. We find no or only weak correlations of t_depl and mu_gas with optical size R or surface density once one removes the above scalings, but we caution that optical sizes may not be appropriate for the high gas and dust columns at high-z.
  • We study the feedback of star formation and nuclear activity on the chemistry of molecular gas in NGC1068, a nearby (D=14Mpc) Seyfert 2 barred galaxy, by analyzing if the abundances of key molecular species like ethynyl (C2H), a classical tracer of PDR, change in the different environments of the disk of the galaxy. We have used ALMA to map the emission of the hyperfine multiplet of C2H(N=1-0) and its underlying continuum emission in the central r~35"(2.5kpc)-region of the disk of NGC1068 with a spatial resolution 1.0"x0.7"(50-70pc). We have developed a set of time-dependent chemical models to determine the origin of the C2H gas. A sizeable fraction of the total C2H line emission is detected from the r~1.3kpc starburst (SB) ring. However, the brightest C2H emission originates from a r~200pc off-centered circumnuclear disk (CND), where evidence of a molecular outflow has been previously found in other molecular tracers imaged by ALMA. We also detect significant emission that connects the CND with the outer disk. We derived the fractional abundances of C2H (X(C2H)) assuming LTE conditions. Our estimates range from X(C2H)~a few 10^-8 in the SB ring up to X(C2H)~ a few 10^-7 in the outflow region. PDR models that incorporate gas-grain chemistry are able to account for X(C2H) in the SB ring for moderately dense (n(H2)>10^4 cm^-3) and moderately UV-irradiated gas (UV-field<10xDraine field) in a steady-state regime. However, the high fractional abundances estimated for C2H in the outflow region can only be reached at very early times (T< 10^2-10^3 yr) in models of UV/X-ray irradiated dense gas (n(H2)>10^4-10^5) cm^-3). We interpret that the transient conditions required to fit the high values of X(C2H) in the outflow are likely due to UV/X-ray irradiated non-dissociative shocks associated with the highly turbulent interface between the outflow and the molecular gas in NGC1068.
  • We present an analysis of far--infrared (FIR) [CII] and [OI] fine structure line and continuum observations obtained with $Herschel$/PACS, and CO(1-0) observations obtained with the IRAM Plateau de Bure Interferometer, of Lyman Break Analogs (LBAs) at $z\sim 0.2$. The principal aim of this work is to determine the typical ISM properties of $z\sim 1-2$ Main Sequence (MS) galaxies, with stellar masses between $10^{9.5}$ and $10^{11}$ $M_{\odot}$, which are currently not easily detectable in all these lines even with ALMA and NOEMA. We perform PDR modeling and apply different IR diagnostics to derive the main physical parameters of the FIR emitting gas and dust and we compare the derived ISM properties to those of galaxies on and above the MS at different redshifts. We find that the ISM properties of LBAs are quite extreme (low gas temperature, high density and thermal pressure) with respect to those found in local normal spirals and more active local galaxies. LBAs have no [CII] deficit despite having the high specific star formation rates (sSFRs) typical of starbursts. Although LBAs lie above the local MS, we show that their ISM properties are more similar to those of high-redshift MS galaxies than of local galaxies above the main sequence. This data set represents an important reference for planning future ALMA [CII] observations of relatively low-mass MS galaxies at the epoch of the peak of the cosmic star formation.
  • We make publicly available a catalog of calibrated environmental measures for galaxies in the five 3D-HST/CANDELS deep fields. Leveraging the spectroscopic and grism redshifts from the 3D-HST survey, multi wavelength photometry from CANDELS, and wider field public data for edge corrections, we derive densities in fixed apertures to characterize the environment of galaxies brighter than $JH_{140} < 24$ mag in the redshift range $0.5<z<3.0$. By linking observed galaxies to a mock sample, selected to reproduce the 3D-HST sample selection and redshift accuracy, each 3D-HST galaxy is assigned a probability density function of the host halo mass, and a probability that is a central or a satellite galaxy. The same procedure is applied to a $z=0$ sample selected from SDSS. We compute the fraction of passive central and satellite galaxies as a function of stellar and halo mass, and redshift, and then derive the fraction of galaxies that were quenched by environment specific processes. Using the mock sample, we estimate that the timescale for satellite quenching is $t_{\rm quench} \sim 2-5$ Gyr; longer at lower stellar mass or lower redshift, but remarkably independent of halo mass. This indicates that, in the range of environments commonly found within the 3D-HST sample, satellites are quenched by exhaustion of their gas reservoir in absence of cosmological accretion. We find that the quenching times can be separated into a delay phase during which satellite galaxies behave similarly to centrals at fixed stellar mass, and a phase where the star formation rate drops rapidly ($\sim 0.4-0.6$ Gyr), as shown previously at $z=0$. We conclude that this scenario requires satellite galaxies to retain a large reservoir of multi-phase gas upon accretion, even at high redshift, and that this gas sustains star formation for the long quenching times observed.
  • We exploit deep integral-field spectroscopic observations with KMOS/VLT of 240 star-forming disks at 0.6 < z < 2.6 to dynamically constrain their mass budget. Our sample consists of massive ($\gtrsim 10^{9.8} M_\odot$) galaxies with sizes $R_e \gtrsim 2$ kpc. By contrasting the observed velocity and dispersion profiles to dynamical models, we find that on average the stellar content contributes $32^{+8}_{-7}\%$ of the total dynamical mass, with a significant spread among galaxies (68th percentile range f_star ~ 18 - 62%). Including molecular gas as inferred from CO- and dust-based scaling relations, the estimated baryonic mass adds up to $56^{+17}_{-12}\%$ of total for the typical galaxy in our sample, reaching ~ 90% at z > 2. We conclude that baryons make up most of the mass within the disk regions of high-redshift star-forming disk galaxies, with typical disks at z > 2 being strongly baryon-dominated within $R_e$. Substantial object-to-object variations in both stellar and baryonic mass fractions are observed among the galaxies in our sample, larger than what can be accounted for by the formal uncertainties in their respective measurements. In both cases, the mass fractions correlate most strongly with measures of surface density. High $\Sigma_{star}$ galaxies feature stellar mass fractions closer to unity, and systems with high inferred gas or baryonic surface densities leave less room for additional mass components other than stars and molecular gas. Our findings can be interpreted as more extended disks probing further (and more compact disks probing less far) into the dark matter halos that host them.
  • We have used the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) to map the emission of the CO(6-5) molecular line and the 432 {\mu}m continuum emission from the 300 pc-sized circumnuclear disk (CND) of the nearby Seyfert 2 galaxy NGC 1068 with a spatial resolution of ~4 pc. These observations spatially resolve the CND and, for the first time, image the dust emission, the molecular gas distribution, and the kinematics from a 7-10 pc-diameter disk that represents the submillimeter counterpart of the putative torus of NGC 1068. We fitted the nuclear spectral energy distribution of the torus using ALMA and near and mid-infrared (NIR/MIR) data with CLUMPY models. The mass and radius of the best-fit solution for the torus are both consistent with the values derived from the ALMA data alone: Mgas_torus=(1+-0.3)x10^5 Msun and Rtorus=3.5+-0.5 pc. The dynamics of the molecular gas in the torus show non-circular motions and enhanced turbulence superposed on the rotating pattern of the disk. The kinematic major axis of the CO torus is tilted relative to its morphological major axis. By contrast with the nearly edge-on orientation of the H2O megamaser disk, we have found evidence suggesting that the molecular torus is less inclined (i=34deg-66deg) at larger radii. The lopsided morphology and complex kinematics of the torus could be the signature of the Papaloizou-Pringle instability, long predicted to likely drive the dynamical evolution of active galactic nuclei (AGN) tori.
  • The optical classification of a Seyfert galaxy and whether it is considered X-ray absorbed are often used interchangeably. But there are many borderline cases and also numerous examples where the optical and X-ray classifications appear to be in conflict. In this article we re-visit the relation between optical obscuration and X-ray absorption in AGNs. We make use of our "dust color" method (Burtscher et al. 2015) to derive the optical obscuration A_V and consistently estimated X-ray absorbing columns using 0.3--150 keV spectral energy distributions. We also take into account the variable nature of the neutral gas column N_H and derive the Seyfert sub-classes of all our objects in a consistent way. We show in a sample of 25 local, hard-X-ray detected Seyfert galaxies (log L_X / (erg/s) ~ 41.5 - 43.5) that there can actually be a good agreement between optical and X-ray classification. If Seyfert types 1.8 and 1.9 are considered unobscured, the threshold between X-ray unabsorbed and absorbed should be chosen at a column N_H = 10^22.3 / cm^2 to be consistent with the optical classification. We find that N_H is related to A_V and that the N_H/A_V ratio is approximately Galactic or higher in all sources, as indicated previously. But in several objects we also see that deviations from the Galactic ratio are only due to a variable X-ray column, showing that (1) deviations from the Galactic N_H/A_V can simply be explained by dust-free neutral gas within the broad line region in some sources, that (2) the dust properties in AGNs can be similar to Galactic dust and that (3) the dust color method is a robust way to estimate the optical extinction towards the sublimation radius in all but the most obscured AGNs.
  • We present Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array observations of the CO J=1-0 transition in a sample of four $z\sim2$ main sequence galaxies. These galaxies are in the blue sequence of star-forming galaxies at their redshift, and are part of the IRAM Plateau de Bure HIgh-$z$ Blue Sequence Survey (PHIBSS) which imaged them in CO J=3-2. Two galaxies are imaged here at high signal-to-noise, allowing determinations of their disk sizes, line profiles, molecular surface densities, and excitation. Using these and published measurements, we show that the CO and optical disks have similar sizes in main-sequence galaxies, and in the galaxy where we can compare CO J=1-0 and J=3-2 sizes we find these are also very similar. Assuming a Galactic CO-to-H$_2$ conversion, we measure surface densities of $\Sigma_{mol}\sim1200$ M$_\odot$pc$^{-2}$ in projection and estimate $\Sigma_{mol}\sim500-900$ M$_\odot$pc$^{-2}$ deprojected. Finally, our data yields velocity-integrated Rayleigh-Jeans brightness temperature line ratios $r_{31}$ that are approximately unity. In addition to the similar disk sizes, the very similar line profiles in J=1-0 and J=3-2 indicate that both transitions sample the same kinematics, implying that their emission is coextensive. We conclude that in these two main sequence galaxies there is no evidence for significant excitation gradients or a large molecular reservoir that is diffuse or cold and not involved in active star-formation. We suggest that $r_{31}$ in very actively star-forming galaxies is likely an indicator of how well mixed the star formation activity and the molecular reservoir are.
  • Galaxy evolution scenarios predict that the feedback of star formation and nuclear activity (AGN) can drive the transformation of gas-rich spiral mergers into ULIRGs, and, eventually, lead to the build-up of QSO/elliptical hosts. We study the role that star formation and AGN feedback have in launching and maintaining the molecular outflows in two starburst-dominated advanced mergers, NGC1614 and IRAS17208-0014, by analyzing the distribution and kinematics of their molecular gas reservoirs. We have used the PdBI array to image with high spatial resolution (0.5"-1.2") the CO(1-0) and CO(2-1) line emissions in NGC1614 and IRAS17208-0014, respectively. The velocity fields of the gas are analyzed and modeled to find the evidence of molecular outflows in these sources and characterize the mass, momentum and energy of these components. While most (>95%) of the CO emission stems from spatially-resolved (~2-3kpc-diameter) rotating disks, we also detect in both mergers the emission from high-velocity line wings that extend up to +-500-700km/s, well beyond the estimated virial range associated with rotation and turbulence. The kinematic major axis of the line wing emission is tilted by ~90deg in NGC1614 and by ~180deg in IRAS17208-0014 relative to their respective rotating disk major axes. These results can be explained by the existence of non-coplanar molecular outflows in both systems. In stark contrast with NGC1614, where star formation alone can drive its molecular outflow, the mass, energy and momentum budget requirements of the molecular outflow in IRAS17208-0014 can be best accounted for by the existence of a so far undetected (hidden) AGN of L_AGN~7x10^11 L_sun. The geometry of the molecular outflow in IRAS17208-0014 suggests that the outflow is launched by a non-coplanar disk that may be associated with a buried AGN in the western nucleus.
  • We present the analysis of HST $J$- and $H$-band imaging for 29 galaxies on the star-forming main sequence at $z\sim2$, which have Adaptive Optics VLT SINFONI integral field spectroscopy from our SINS/zC-SINF program. The SINFONI H$\alpha$ data resolve the on-going star-formation and the ionized gas kinematics on scales of $1-2$ kpc; the near-IR images trace the galaxies' rest-frame optical morphologies and distributions of stellar mass in old stellar populations at a similar resolution. The global light profiles of most galaxies show disk-like properties well described by a single S\'ersic profile with $n\sim1$, with only $\sim15%$ requiring a high $n>3$ S\'ersic index, all more massive than $10^{10}M_\odot$. In bulge+disk fits, about $40%$ of galaxies have a measurable bulge component in the light profiles, with $\sim15%$ showing a substantial bulge-to-total ratio $B/T\ge0.3$. This is a lower limit to the frequency of $z\sim2$ massive galaxies with a developed bulge component in stellar mass because it could be hidden by dust and/or outshined by a thick actively star-forming disk component. The galaxies' rest-optical half-light radii range between $1-7$ kpc, with a median of 2.1 kpc, and lie slightly above the size-mass relation at these epochs reported in the literature. This is attributed to differences in sample selection and definitions of size and/or mass measurements. The $(u-g)_{rest}$ color gradient and scatter within individual $z\sim2$ massive galaxies with $\ge10^{11}M_\odot$ are as high as in $z=0$ low-mass, late-type galaxies, and are consistent with the high star-formation rates of massive $z\sim2$ galaxies being sustained at large galactocentric distances.
  • We study the relationship between the structure and star-formation rate (SFR) of X-ray selected low and moderate luminosity active galactic nuclei (AGNs) in the two Chandra Deep Fields, using Hubble Space Telescope imaging from the Cosmic Assembly Near Infrared Extragalactic Legacy Survey (CANDELS) and deep far-infrared maps from the PEP+GOODS-Herschel survey. We derive detailed distributions of structural parameters and FIR luminosities from carefully constructed control samples of galaxies, which we then compare to those of the AGNs. At z~1, AGNs show slightly diskier light profiles than massive inactive (non-AGN) galaxies, as well as modestly higher levels of gross galaxy disturbance (as measured by visual signatures of interactions and clumpy structure). In contrast, at z~2, AGNs show similar levels of galaxy disturbance as inactive galaxies, but display a red central light enhancement, which may arise due to a more pronounced bulge in AGN hosts or due to extinguished nuclear light. We undertake a number of tests of these alternatives, but our results do not strongly favour one interpretation over the other. The mean SFR and its distribution among AGNs and inactive galaxies are similar at z>1.5. At z<1, however, clear and significant enhancements are seen in the SFRs of AGNs with bulge-dominated light profiles. These trends suggest an evolution in the relation between nuclear activity and host properties with redshift, towards a minor role for mergers and interactions at z>1.5.
  • In this paper we follow up on our previous detection of nuclear ionized outflows in the most massive (log(M*/Msun) >= 10.9) z~1-3 star-forming galaxies (Forster Schreiber et al.), by increasing the sample size by a factor of six (to 44 galaxies above log(M*/Msun) >= 10.9) from a combination of the SINS/zC-SINF, LUCI, GNIRS, and KMOS^3D spectroscopic surveys. We find a fairly sharp onset of the incidence of broad nuclear emission (FWHM in the Ha, [NII], and [SII] lines ~ 450-5300 km/s), with large [NII]/Ha ratios, above log(M*/Msun) ~ 10.9, with about two thirds of the galaxies in this mass range exhibiting this component. Broad nuclear components near and above the Schechter mass are similarly prevalent above and below the main sequence of star-forming galaxies, and at z~1 and ~2. The line ratios of the nuclear component are fit by excitation from active galactic nuclei (AGN), or by a combination of shocks and photoionization. The incidence of the most massive galaxies with broad nuclear components is at least as large as that of AGNs identified by X-ray, optical, infrared or radio indicators. The mass loading of the nuclear outflows is near unity. Our findings provide compelling evidence for powerful, high-duty cycle, AGN-driven outflows near the Schechter mass, and acting across the peak of cosmic galaxy formation.
  • We present a detailed analysis of ALMA Bands 7 and 9 data of CO, HCO+, HCN and CS, augmented with Plateau de Bure Interferometer (PdBI) data of the ~ 200 pc circumnuclear disk (CND) and the ~ 1.3 kpc starburst ring (SB ring) of NGC~1068, a nearby (D = 14 Mpc) Seyfert 2 barred galaxy. We aim at determining the physical characteristics of the dense gas present in the CND and whether the different line intensity ratios we find within the CND as well as between the CND and the SB ring are due to excitation effects (gas density and temperature differences) or to a different chemistry. We estimate the column densities of each species in Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium (LTE). We then compute large one-dimensional non-LTE radiative transfer grids (using RADEX) by using first only the CO transitions, and then all the available molecules in order to constrain the densities, temperatures and column densities within the CND. We finally present a preliminary set of chemical models to determine the origin of the gas. We find that in general the gas in the CND is very dense (> 10^5 cm^-3) and hot (T> 150K), with differences especially in the temperature across the CND. The AGN position has the lowest CO/HCO+, CO/HCN and CO/CS column density ratios. RADEX analyses seem to indicate that there is chemical differentiation across the CND. We also find differences between the chemistry of the SB ring and some regions of the CND; the SB ring is also much colder and less dense than the CND. Chemical modelling does not succeed in reproducing all the molecular ratios with one model per region, suggesting the presence of multi-gas phase components. The LTE, RADEX and chemical analyses all indicate that more than one gas-phase component is necessary to uniquely fit all the available molecular ratios within the CND.
  • We investigate the fueling and the feedback of star formation and nuclear activity in NGC1068, a nearby (D=14Mpc) Seyfert 2 barred galaxy, by analyzing the distribution and kinematics of the molecular gas in the disk. We have used ALMA to map the emission of a set of dense molecular gas tracers (CO(3-2), CO(6-5), HCN(4-3), HCO+(4-3) and CS(7-6)) and their underlying continuum emission in the central r ~ 2kpc of NGC1068 with spatial resolutions ~ 0.3"-0.5" (~ 20-35pc). Molecular line and dust continuum emissions are detected from a r ~ 200pc off-centered circumnuclear disk (CND), from the 2.6kpc-diameter bar region, and from the r ~ 1.3kpc starburst (SB) ring. Most of the emission in HCO+, HCN and CS stems from the CND. Molecular line ratios show dramatic order-of-magnitude changes inside the CND that are correlated with the UV/X-ray illumination by the AGN, betraying ongoing feedback. The gas kinematics from r ~ 50pc out to r ~ 400pc reveal a massive (M_mol ~ 2.7 (+0.9, -1.2) x 10^7 Msun) outflow in all molecular tracers. The tight correlation between the ionized gas outflow, the radio jet and the occurrence of outward motions in the disk suggests that the outflow is AGN-driven. The outflow rate estimated in the CND, dM/dt ~ 63 (+21, -37) Msun yr^-1, is an order of magnitude higher than the star formation rate at these radii, confirming that the outflow is AGN-driven. The power of the AGN is able to account for the estimated momentum and kinetic luminosity of the outflow. The CND mass load rate of the CND outflow implies a very short gas depletion time scale of <=1 Myr.
  • We report the detection of ubiquitous powerful nuclear outflows in massive (> 10^11 Msun) z~2 star-forming galaxies (SFGs), which are plausibly driven by an Active Galactic Nucleus (AGN). The sample consists of the eight most massive SFGs from our SINS/zC-SINF survey of galaxy kinematics with the imaging spectrometer SINFONI, six of which have sensitive high-resolution adaptive optics (AO) assisted observations. All of the objects are disks hosting a significant stellar bulge. The spectra in their central regions exhibit a broad component in Halpha and forbidden [NII] and [SII] line emission, with typical velocity FWHM ~ 1500 km/s, [NII]/Halpha ratio ~ 0.6, and intrinsic extent of 2 - 3 kpc. These properties are consistent with warm ionized gas outflows associated with Type 2 AGN, the presence of which is confirmed via independent diagnostics in half the galaxies. The data imply a median ionized gas mass outflow rate of ~ 60 Msun/yr and mass loading of ~ 3. At larger radii, a weaker broad component is detected but with lower FWHM ~ 485 km/s and [NII]/Halpha ~ 0.35, characteristic for star formation-driven outflows as found in the lower-mass SINS/zC-SINF galaxies. The high inferred mass outflow rates and frequent occurrence suggest the nuclear outflows efficiently expel gas out of the centers of the galaxies with high duty cycles, and may thus contribute to the process of star formation quenching in massive galaxies. Larger samples at high masses will be crucial to confirm the importance and energetics of the nuclear outflow phenomenon, and its connection to AGN activity and bulge growth.
  • [Abridged] We study the evolution of the dust temperatures of galaxies in the SFR-M* plane up to z~2 using observations from the Herschel Space Observatory. Starting from a sample of galaxies with reliable star-formation rates (SFRs), stellar masses (M*) and redshift estimates, we grid the SFR-M* parameter space in several redshift ranges and estimate the mean Tdust of each SFR-M*-z bin. Dust temperatures are inferred using the stacked far-infrared flux densities of our SFR-M*-z bins. At all redshifts, Tdust increases with infrared luminosities (LIR), specific SFRs (SSFR; i.e., SFR/M*) and distances with respect to the main sequence (MS) of the SFR-M* plane (i.e., D_SSFR_MS=log[SSFR(galaxy)/SSFR_MS(M*,z)]). The Tdust-SSFR and Tdust-D_SSFR_MS correlations are statistically more significant than the Tdust-LIR one. While the slopes of these three correlations are redshift-independent, their normalizations evolve from z=0 and z~2. We convert these results into a recipe to derive Tdust from SFR, M* and z. The existence of a strong Tdust-D_SSFR_MS correlation provides us with information on the dust and gas content of galaxies. (i) The slope of the Tdust-D__SSFR_MS correlation can be explained by the increase of the star-formation efficiency (SFE; SFR/Mgas) with D_SSFR_MS as found locally by molecular gas studies. (ii) At fixed D_SSFR_MS, the constant Tdust observed in galaxies probing large ranges in SFR and M* can be explained by an increase or decrease of the number of star-forming regions with comparable SFE enclosed in them. (iii) At high redshift, the normalization towards hotter temperature of the Tdust-D_SSFR_MS correlation can be explained by the decrease of the metallicities of galaxies or by the increase of the SFE of MS galaxies. All these results support the hypothesis that the conditions prevailing in the star-forming regions of MS and far-above-MS galaxies are different.
  • As part of the SINS/zC-SINF surveys of high-z galaxy kinematics, we derive the radial distributions of H-alpha surface brightness, stellar mass surface density, and dynamical mass at ~2 kpc resolution in 19 z~2 star-forming disks with deep SINFONI AO spectroscopy at the ESO VLT. From these data we infer the radial distribution of the Toomre Q-parameter for these main-sequence star forming galaxies (SFGs), covering almost two decades of stellar mass (10^9.6 to 10^11.5 solar masses). In more than half of our SFGs, the H-alpha distributions cannot be fit by a centrally peaked distribution, such as an exponential, but are better described by a ring, or the combination of a ring and an exponential. At the same time the kinematic data indicate the presence of a mass distribution more centrally concentrated than a single exponential distribution for 5 of the 19 galaxies. The resulting Q-distributions are centrally peaked for all, and significantly exceed unity there for three quarters of the SFGs. The occurrence of H-alpha rings and of large nuclear Q-values is strongly correlated, and is more common for the more massive SFGs. While our sample is small and there remain substantial uncertainties and caveats, our observations are consistent with a scenario in which cloud fragmentation and global star formation are secularly suppressed in gas rich high-z disks from the inside out, as the central stellar mass density of the disks grows.
  • Quasi-stellar objects (QSOs) occur in galaxies in which supermassive black holes (SMBHs) are growing substantially through rapid accretion of gas. Many popular models of the co-evolutionary growth of galaxies and SMBHs predict that QSOs are also sites of substantial recent star formation, mediated by important processes, such as major mergers, which rapidly transform the nature of galaxies. A detailed study of the star-forming properties of QSOs is a critical test of such models. We present a far-infrared Herschel/PACS study of the mean star formation rate (SFR) of a sample of spectroscopically observed QSOs to z~2 from the COSMOS extragalactic survey. This is the largest sample to date of moderately luminous AGNs studied using uniform, deep far-infrared photometry. We study trends of the mean SFR with redshift, black hole mass, nuclear bolometric luminosity and specific accretion rate (Eddington ratio). To minimize systematics, we have undertaken a uniform determination of SMBH properties, as well as an analysis of important selection effects within spectroscopic QSO samples that influence the interpretation of SFR trends. We find that the mean SFRs of these QSOs are consistent with those of normal massive star-forming galaxies with a fixed scaling between SMBH and galaxy mass at all redshifts. No strong enhancement in SFR is found even among the most rapidly accreting systems, at odds with several co-evolutionary models. Finally, we consider the qualitative effects on mean SFR trends from different assumptions about the star-forming properties of QSO hosts and redshift evolution of the SMBH-galaxy relationship. While limited currently by uncertainties, valuable constraints on AGN-galaxy co-evolution can emerge from our approach.
  • Based on high-resolution, spatially resolved data of 10 z~2 star-forming galaxies from the SINS/zC-SINF survey and LUCI data for 12 additional galaxies, we probe the excitation properties of high-z galaxies and the impact of active galactic nuclei (AGN), shocks and photoionization. We explore how these spatially-resolved line ratios can inform our interpretation of integrated emission line ratios obtained at high redshift. Many of our galaxies fall in the `composite' region of the z~0 [NII]/Ha versus [OIII]/Hb diagnostic (BPT) diagram, between star-forming galaxies and those with AGN. Based on our resolved measurements, we find that some of these galaxies likely host an AGN, while others appear to be affected by the presence of shocks possibly caused by an outflow or from enhanced ionization parameter as compared with HII regions in normal local star-forming galaxies. We find that the Mass-Excitation (MEx) diagnostic, which separates purely star-forming and AGN hosting local galaxies in the [OIII]/Hb versus stellar mass plane, does not properly separate z~2 galaxies classified according to the BPT diagram. However, if we shift the galaxies based on the offset between the local and z~2 mass-metallicity relation (i.e. to the mass they would have at z~0 with the same metallicity), we find better agreement between the MEx and BPT diagnostics. Finally, we find that metallicity calibrations based on [NII]/Ha are more biased by shocks and AGN at high-z than the [OIII]/Hb/[NII]/Ha calibration.
  • We use deep far-infrared data from the PEP/GOODS-Herschel surveys and rest frame ultraviolet photometry to study the evolution of the molecular gas mass function of normal star forming galaxies. Computing the molecular gas mass, M(mol), by scaling star formation rates (SFR) through depletion timescales, or combining IR luminosity and obscuration properties as in Nordon et al., we obtain M(mol) for roughly 700, z=0.2-3.0 galaxies near the star forming "main sequence". The number density of galaxies follows a Schechter function of M(mol). The characteristic mass M* is found to strongly evolve up to z~1, and then to flatten at earlier epochs, resembling the infrared luminosity evolution of similar objects. At z~1, our result is supported by an estimate based on the stellar mass function of star forming galaxies and gas fraction scalings from the PHIBSS survey. We compare our measurements to results from current models, finding better agreement with those that are treating star formation laws directly rather than in post-processing. Integrating the mass function, we study the evolution of the M(mol) density and its density parameter Omega(mol).
  • Massive galaxies in the distant Universe form stars at much higher rates than today. Although direct resolution of the star forming regions of these galaxies is still a challenge, recent molecular gas observations at the IRAM Plateau de Bure interferometer enable us to study the star formation efficiency on subgalactic scales around redshift z = 1.2. We present a method for obtaining the gas and star formation rate (SFR) surface densities of ensembles of clumps composing galaxies at this redshift, even though the corresponding scales are not resolved. This method is based on identifying these structures in position-velocity diagrams corresponding to slices within the galaxies. We use unique IRAM observations of the CO(3-2) rotational line and DEEP2 spectra of four massive star forming distant galaxies - EGS13003805, EGS13004291, EGS12007881, and EGS13019128 in the AEGIS terminology - to determine the gas and SFR surface densities of the identifiable ensembles of clumps that constitute them. The integrated CO line luminosity is assumed to be directly proportional to the total gas mass, and the SFR is deduced from the [OII] line. We identify the ensembles of clumps with the angular resolution available in both CO and [OII] spectroscopy; i.e., 1-1.5". SFR and gas surface densities are averaged in areas of this size, which is also the thickness of the DEEP2 slits and of the extracted IRAM slices, and we derive a spatially resolved Kennicutt-Schmidt (KS) relation on a scale of ~8 kpc. The data generally indicates an average depletion time of 1.9 Gyr, but with significant variations from point to point within the galaxies.
  • We present results from the deepest Herschel-PACS (Photodetector Array Camera and Spectrometer) far-infrared blank field extragalactic survey, obtained by combining observations of the GOODS (Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey) fields from the PACS Evolutionary Probe (PEP) and GOODS-Herschel key programmes. We describe data reduction and the construction of images and catalogues. In the deepest parts of the GOODS-S field, the catalogues reach 3-sigma depths of 0.9, 0.6 and 1.3 mJy at 70, 100 and 160 um, respectively, and resolve ~75% of the cosmic infrared background at 100um and 160um into individually detected sources. We use these data to estimate the PACS confusion noise, to derive the PACS number counts down to unprecedented depths and to determine the infrared luminosity function of galaxies down to LIR=10^11 Lsun at z~1 and LIR=10^12 Lsun at z~2, respectively. For the infrared luminosity function of galaxies, our deep Herschel far-infrared observations are fundamental because they provide more accurate infrared luminosity estimates than those previously obtained from mid-infrared observations. Maps and source catalogues (>3-sigma) are now publicly released. Combined with the large wealth of multi-wavelength data available for the GOODS fields, these data provide a powerful new tool for studying galaxy evolution over a broad range of redshifts.