• The Sloan Digital Sky Survey--III (SDSS--III) Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE) has obtained high resolution (R $\sim$ 22,500), high signal-to-noise ratio ($>$ 100) spectra in the H$-$band ($\sim$1.5$-$1.7 $\mu$m) for about 146,000 stars in the Milky Way galaxy. We have computed spectral libraries with effective temperature ($T\rm{_{eff}}$) ranging from 3500 to 8000 K for the automated chemical analy\-sis of the survey data. The libraries, used to derive stellar parameters and abundances from the APOGEE spectra in the SDSS--III data release 12 (DR12), are based on ATLAS9 model atmospheres and the ASS$\epsilon$T spectral synthesis code. We present a second set of libraries based on MARCS model atmospheres and the spectral synthesis code Turbospectrum. The ATLAS9/ASS$\epsilon$T ($T\rm{_{eff}}$ = 3500$-$8000 K) and MARCS/Turbospectrum ($T\rm{_{eff}}$ = 3500$-$5500 K) grids cover a wide range of metallicity ($-$2.5 $\leq$ [M/H] $\leq$ $+$0.5 dex), surface gravity (0 $\leq$ log $g$ $\leq$ 5 dex), microturbulence (0.5 $\leq$ $\xi$ $\leq$ 8 km~s$^{-1}$), carbon ($-$1 $\leq$ [C/M] $\leq$ $+$1 dex), nitrogen ($-$1 $\leq$ [N/M] $\leq$ $+$1 dex), and $\alpha$-element ($-$1 $\leq$ [$\alpha$/M] $\leq$ $+$1 dex) variations, having thus seven dimensions. We compare the ATLAS9/ASS$\epsilon$T and MARCS/Turbospectrum libraries and apply both of them to the analysis of the observed H$-$band spectra of the Sun and the K2 giant Arcturus, as well as to a selected sample of well-known giant stars observed at very high-resolution. The new APOGEE libraries are publicly available and can be employed for chemical studies in the H$-$band using other high-resolution spectrographs.
  • The SDSS-III Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE) is a three year survey that is collecting 100,000 high-resolution spectra in the near-IR across multiple Galactic populations. To derive stellar parameters and chemical compositions from this massive data set, the APOGEE Stellar Parameters and Chemical Abundances Pipeline (ASPCAP) has been developed. Here, we describe empirical calibrations of stellar parameters presented in the first SDSS-III APOGEE data release (DR10). These calibrations were enabled by observations of 559 stars in 20 globular and open clusters. The cluster observations were supplemented by observations of stars in NASA's Kepler field that have well determined surface gravities from asteroseismic analysis. We discuss the accuracy and precision of the derived stellar parameters, considering especially effective temperature, surface gravity, and metallicity; we also briefly discuss the derived results for the abundances of the alpha-elements, carbon, and nitrogen. Overall, we find that ASPCAP achieves reasonably accurate results for temperature and metallicity, but suffers from systematic errors in surface gravity. We derive calibration relations that bring the raw ASPCAP results into better agreement with independently determined stellar parameters. The internal scatter of ASPCAP parameters within clusters suggests that, metallicities are measured with a precision better than 0.1 dex, effective temperatures better than 150 K, and surface gravities better than 0.2 dex. The understanding provided by the clusters and Kepler giants on the current accuracy and precision will be invaluable for future improvements of the pipeline.
  • To derive space velocities of stars along the line of sight from wavelength shifts in stellar spectra requires accounting for a number of second-order effects. For most stars, gravitational redshifts, convective blueshifts, and transverse stellar motion are the dominant contributors. We provide theoretical corrections for the net velocity shifts due to convection expected for the measurements from the Gaia Radial Velocity Spectrometer (RVS). We used a set of three-dimensional time-dependent simulations of stellar surface convection computed with CO5BOLD to calculate spectra of late-type stars in the Gaia RVS range and to infer the net velocity offset that convective motions will induce in radial velocities derived by cross-correlation. The net velocity shifts derived by cross-correlation depend both on the wavelength range and spectral resolution of the observations. Convective shifts for Gaia RVS observations are less than 0.1 km/s for late-K-type stars, and they increase with stellar mass, reaching about 0.3 km/s or more for early F-type dwarfs. This tendency is the result of an increase with effective temperature in both temperature and velocity fluctuations in the line-forming region. Our simulations also indicate that the net RVS convective shifts can be positive (i.e. redshifts) in some cases. Overall, the blueshifts weaken slightly with increasing surface gravity, and are enhanced at low metallicity. Gravitational redshifts amount up to 0.7 km/s and dominate convective blueshifts for dwarfs, but become much weaker for giants.
  • We have obtained ultra-high quality spectra (R=180,000; S/N>300) with unprecedented wavelength coverage (4400 to 7400 A) for a number of stars covering most of the HR diagram in order to test the predictions of models of stellar surface convection. Line bisectors and core wavelength shifts are both measured and modeled, allowing us to validate and/or reveal the limitations of state-of-the-art hydrodynamic model atmospheres of different stellar parameters. We show the status of our project and preliminary results.
  • We construct a 3D radiative-hydrodynamic model atmosphere of parameters Teff = 4820 K, log g = 4.5, and solar chemical composition. The theoretical line profiles computed with this model are asymmetric, with their bisectors having a characteristic C-shape and their core wavelengths shifted with respect to their laboratory values. The line bisectors span from about 10 to 250 m/s, depending on line strength, with the stronger features showing larger span. The corresponding core wavelength shifts range from about -200 m/s for the weak Fe I lines to almost +100 m/s in the strong Fe I features. Based on observational results for the Sun, we argue that there should be no core wavelength shift for Fe I lines of EW > 100 mA. The cores of the strongest lines show contributions from the uncertain top layers of the model, where non-LTE effects and the presence of the chromosphere, which are important in real stars, are not accounted for. The comparison of model predictions to observed Fe I line bisectors and core wavelength shifts for a reference star, HIP86400, shows excellent agreement, with the exception of the core wavelength shifts of the strongest features, for which we suspect inaccurate theoretical values. Since this limitation does not affect the predicted line equivalent widths significantly, we consider our 3D model validated for photospheric abundance work.
  • A possible origin of the iron-deficiency in PG1159 stars could be neutron captures on Fe nuclei. A nickel overabundance would corroborate this idea. Consequently we are looking for nickel lines in PG1159 stars. Prime targets are relatively cool objects, because Ni VI is the dominant ionisation stage and the spectral lines of this ion are accessible with UV observations. We do not find such lines in the coolest PG1159 star observed by FUSE (PG1707+427, Teff = 85,000 K) and conclude that the nickel abundance is not enhanced. Hence, the Fe-deficiency in PG1159 stars remains unexplained. In addition, we present results of a wind analysis of the hybrid-PG1159 star NGC 7094 and the [WC]-PG1159 transition-type object Abell 78 in order to derive F abundances from the F VI 1139.5 Angstrom line. In both cases, we find F overabundances, in agreement with results of photospheric analyses of many PG1159 stars. Surprisingly, we find indications for a very low O abundance in NGC 7094.
  • We examine closely the solar Center-to-Limb variation of continua and lines and compare observations with predictions from both a 3-D hydrodynamic simulation of the solar surface (provided by M. Asplund and collaborators) and 1-D model atmospheres. Intensities from the 3-D time series are derived by means of the new synthesis code ASSET, which overcomes limitations of previously available codes by including a consistent treatment of scattering and allowing for arbitrarily complex line and continuum opacities. In the continuum, we find very similar discrepancies between synthesis and observation for both types of model atmospheres. This is in contrast to previous studies that used a ``horizontally'' and time averaged representation of the 3-D model and found a significantly larger disagreement with observations. The presence of temperature and velocity fields in the 3-D simulation provides a significant advantage when it comes to reproduce solar spectral line shapes. Nonetheless, a comparison of observed and synthetic equivalent widths reveals that the 3-D model also predicts more uniform abundances as a function of position angle on the disk. We conclude that the 3-D simulation provides not only a more realistic description of the gas dynamics, but, despite its simplified treatment of the radiation transport, it also predicts reasonably well the observed Center-to-Limb variation, which is indicative of a thermal structure free from significant systematic errors.
  • We report high-resolution spectroscopy of 125 field stars previously observed as part of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and its program for Galactic studies, the Sloan Extension for Galactic Understanding and Exploration (SEGUE). These spectra are used to measure radial velocities and to derive atmospheric parameters, which we compare with those reported by the SEGUE Stellar Parameter Pipeline (SSPP). The SSPP obtains estimates of these quantities based on SDSS ugriz photometry and low-resolution (R = 2000) spectroscopy. For F- and G-type stars observed with high signal-to-noise ratios (S/N), we empirically determine the typical random uncertainties in the radial velocities, effective temperatures, surface gravities, and metallicities delivered by the SSPP to be 2.4 km/s, 130 K (2.2%), 0.21 dex, and 0.11 dex, respectively, with systematic uncertainties of a similar magnitude in the effective temperatures and metallicities. We estimate random errors for lower S/N spectra based on numerical simulations.
  • We describe the development and implementation of the SEGUE (Sloan Extension for Galactic Exploration and Understanding) Stellar Parameter Pipeline (SSPP). The SSPP derives, using multiple techniques, radial velocities and the fundamental stellar atmospheric parameters (effective temperature, surface gravity, and metallicity) for AFGK-type stars, based on medium-resolution spectroscopy and $ugriz$ photometry obtained during the course of the original Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-I) and its Galactic extension (SDSS-II/SEGUE). The SSPP also provides spectral classification for a much wider range of stars, including stars with temperatures outside of the window where atmospheric parameters can be estimated with the current approaches. This is Paper I in a series of papers on the SSPP; it provides an overview of the SSPP, and initial tests of its performance using multiple data sets. Random and systematic errors are critically examined for the current version of the SSPP, which has been used for the sixth public data release of the SDSS (DR-6).
  • The Variable Star One-shot Project (VSOP) is aimed at (1) providing the variability type and spectral type of all unstudied variable stars, (2) process, publish, and make the data available as automatically as possible, and (3) generate serendipitous discoveries. This first paper describes the project itself, the acquisition of the data, the dataflow, the spectroscopic analysis and the on-line availability of the fully calibrated and reduced data. We also present the results on the 221 stars observed during the first semester of the project. We used the high-resolution echelle spectrographs HARPS and FEROS in the ESO La Silla Observatory (Chile) to survey known variable stars. Once reduced by the dedicated pipelines, the radial velocities are determined from cross correlation with synthetic template spectra, and the spectral types are determined by an automatic minimum distance matching to synthetic spectra, with traditional manual spectral typing cross-checks. The variability types are determined by manually evaluating the available light curves and the spectroscopy. In the future, a new automatic classifier, currently being developed by members of the VSOP team, based on these spectroscopic data and on the photometric classifier developed for the COROT and Gaia space missions, will be used. We confirm or revise spectral types of 221 variable stars from the GCVS. We identify 26 previously unknown multiple systems, among them several visual binaries with spectroscopic binary individual components. We present new individual results for the multiple systems V349 Vel and BC Gru, for the composite spectrum star V4385 Sgr, for the T-Tauri star V1045 Sco, and for DM Boo which we re-classify as a BY Draconis variable. The complete data release can be accessed via the VSOP web site.
  • The Variable Star One-shot Project (VSOP) aimed at providing to the world-wide stellar community the necessary one-shot spectrum of unstudied variable stars, too often classified as such by an analysis of photometric data only. The VSOP has established an new kind of observational model, where all steps from observations to spectral analysis, are automatized (or are underway to be fully automatized). The project is centralized on a collaborative wiki website. The VSOP operational model is very successful, data is continously flowing and being analyszed, and VSOP is now a worldwide open collaboration of people with very different and complementary skills and expertise. The idea of a central wiki website has been extended by one of us to propose a new service to the whole astronomical community, called Wikimbad. Wikimbad is an open wiki website aimed at collecting, organizing and making publicly available all kind of reduced and published astronomical data. Its strengths and a comparison with the Virtual Observatory are discussed. See: http://vsop.sc.eso.org and http://wikimbad.org
  • FUSE high resolution spectra of two PG1159 type central stars (K1-16 and NGC 7094) have revealed an unexpected iron deficiency of at least 1 or 2 dex (Miksa et al. 2002). Here we present early results of FUSE spectroscopy of the CSPN Abell 78. It is shown that iron is strongly deficient in this star, too.