• Context. Astrometric monitoring of directly-imaged exoplanets allows the study of their orbital parameters and system architectures. Because most directly-imaged planets have long orbital periods (>20 AU), accurate astrometry is challenging when based on data acquired on timescales of a few years and usually with different instruments. The LMIRCam camera on the LBT is being used for the LEECH survey to search for and characterize young and adolescent exoplanets in L' band, including their system architectures. Aims. We first aim to provide a good astrometric calibration of LMIRCam. Then, we derive new astrometry, test the predictions of the orbital model of 8:4:2:1 mean motion resonance proposed by Go\'zdziewski & Migaszewski, and perform new orbital fitting of the HR 8799 bcde planets. We also present deep limits on a putative fifth planet interior to the known planets. Methods. We use observations of HR 8799 and the Theta1 Ori C field obtained during the same run in October 2013. Results. We first characterize the distortion of LMIRCam. We determine a platescale and a true north orientation for the images of 10.707 +/- 0.012 mas/pix and -0.430 +/- 0.076 deg, respectively. The errors on the platescale and true north orientation translate into astrometric accuracies at a separation of 1 of 1.1 mas and 1.3 mas, respectively. The measurements for all planets are usually in agreement within 3 sigma with the ephemeris predicted by Go\'zdziewski & Migaszewski. The orbital fitting based on the new astrometric measurements favors an architecture for the planetary system based on 8:4:2:1 mean motion resonance. The detection limits allow us to exclude a fifth planet slightly brighter/more massive than HR 8799 b at the location of the 2:1 resonance with HR 8799 e (~9.5 AU) and about twice as bright as HR 8799 cde at the location of the 3:1 resonance with HR 8799 e (~7.5 AU).
  • We utilize the new Magellan adaptive optics system (MagAO) to image the binary proplyd LV 1 in the Orion Trapezium at H alpha. This is among the first AO results in visible wavelengths. The H alpha image clearly shows the ionization fronts, the interproplyd shell, and the cometary tails. Our astrometric measurements find no significant relative motion between components over ~18 yr, implying that LV 1 is a low-mass system. We also analyze Large Binocular Telescope AO observations, and find a point source which may be the embedded protostar's photosphere in the continuum. Converting the H magnitudes to mass, we show that the LV 1 binary may consist of one very-low-mass star with a likely brown dwarf secondary, or even plausibly a double brown dwarf. Finally, the magnetopause of the minor proplyd is estimated to have a radius of 110 AU, consistent with the location of the bow shock seen in H alpha.
  • We present preliminary astrometric results for the closest known brown dwarf binary to the Sun: Epsilon Indi Ba, Bb at a distance of 3.626 pc. Via ongoing monitoring of the relative separation of the two brown dwarfs (spectral types T1 and T6) with the VLT NACO near-IR adaptive optics system since June 2004, we obtain a model-independent dynamical total mass for the system of 121 MJup, some 60% larger than the one obtained by McCaughrean et al. (2004), implying that the system may be as old as 5 Gyr. We have also been monitoring the absolute astrometric motions of the system using the VLT FORS2 optical imager since August 2005 to determine the individual masses. We predict a periastron passage in early 2010, by which time the system mass will be constrained to < 1 MJup and we will be able to determine the individual masses accurately in a dynamical, model-independent manner.
  • We present the results of a high resolution near infrared adaptive optics survey of the young obscured star forming region NGC 2024. Out of the total 73 stars detected in the adaptive optics survey of the cluster, we find 3 binaries and one triple. The resulting companion star fraction, 7+/-3% in the separation range of 0.''35-2.''3 (145-950 AU), is consistent with that expected from the multiplicity of mature solar-type stars in the local neighborhood. Our survey was sensitive to faint secondaries but no companions with Delta K' > 1.2 magnitudes are detected within 2'' of any star. The cluster has a K' luminosity function that peaks at ~12, and although our completeness limit was 17.7 magnitude at K', the faintest star we detect had a K' magnitude of 16.62.
  • Use of the highly sensitive Hokupa'a curvature wavefront sensor has allowed for the first time direct adaptive optics (AO) guiding on brown dwarfs and VLM stars (SpT=M7-L2). An initial survey of 9 such objects discovered one 0.15" binary (2MASSJ 1426316+155701). The companion is about half as bright as the primary (Delta K = 0.61+/-0.05$, Delta H = 0.70+/-0.05) and has even redder colors H-K=0.59+/-0.14 than the primary. The blended spectrum of the binary has been previously determined to be M9.0. We modeled a blend of an M8.5 template and a L1-L3 template reproducing a M9.0 spectrum in the case of Delta K = 0.61+/-0.05,Delta H = 0.70\pm0.05$. These spectral types also match the observed H-K colors of each star. Based the previously observed low space motion and $H_{\alpha}$ activity we assign an age of $0.8^{+6.7}_{-0.3} Gyr$. Utilizing this age range and the latest DUSTY models of the Lyon group we assign a photometric distance of $18.8^{+1.44}_{-1.02} pc$ and masses of $M_{A}=0.074^{+0.005}_{-0.011} M_\odot$ and $M_{B}=0.066^{+0.006}_{-0.015} M_\odot$. We therefore estimate a system separation of $2.92_{+0.22}^{-0.16}AU$ and a period of $13.3{+3.18}^{-1.51} yr$ respectively. Hence, 2M1426 is among the smallest separation brown dwarf binaries resolved to date.