• The propagation of nonlinear waves in a lattice of repelling particles is studied theoretically and experimentally. A simple experimental setup is proposed, consisting in an array of coupled magnetic dipoles. By driving harmonically the lattice at one boundary, we excite propagating waves and demonstrate different regimes of mode conversion into higher harmonics, strongly influenced by dispersion and discreteness. The phenomenon of acoustic dilatation of the chain is also predicted and discussed. The results are compared with the theoretical predictions of $\alpha$-FPU equation, describing a chain of masses connected by nonlinear quadratic springs. The results can be extrapolated to other systems described by this equation.
  • The complex band structures calculated using the Extended Plane Wave Expansion (EPWE) reveal the presence of evanescent modes in periodic systems, never predicted by the classical \omega(\vec{k}) methods, providing novel interpretations of several phenomena as well as a complete picture of the system. In this work we theoretically and experimentally observe that in the ranges of frequencies where a deaf band is traditionally predicted, an evanescent mode with the excitable symmetry appears changing drastically the interpretation of the transmission properties. On the other hand, the simplicity of the sonic crystals in which only the longitudinal polarization can be excited, is used to interpret, without loss of generality, the level repulsion between symmetric and antisymmetric bands in sonic crystals as the presence of an evanescent mode connecting both repelled bands. These evanescent modes, obtained using EPWE, explain both the attenuation produced in this range of frequencies and the transfer of symmetry from one band to the other in good agreement with both experimental results and multiple scattering predictions. Thus, the evanescent properties of the periodic system have been revealed necessary for the design of new acoustic and electromagnetic applications based on periodicity.
  • This work theoretically and experimentally reports the evanescent connections between propagating bands in periodic acoustic materials. The complex band structures obtained by solving for the $k(\omega)$ problem reveal a complete interpretation of the propagation properties of these systems. The prediction of evanescent modes, non predicted by classical $\omega(\vec{k})$ methods, is of interest for the understanding of these propagation properties. Complex band structures provide an interpretation of the evanescent coupling and the level repulsion states showing the possibility to control of evanescent waves in periodic materials.
  • The effect of the presence of a finite impedance surface on the wave propagation properties of a two-dimensional periodic array of rigid cylinders with their axes perpendicular to the surface is both numerically and experimentally analyzed in this work. In this realistic situation both the incident and the scattered waves interact with these two elements, the surface and the array. The interaction between the excess attenuation effect, due to the destructive interference produced by the superposition of the incident wave and the reflected one by the surface, and the bandgap, due to the periodicity of the array, is fundamental for the design of devices to control the transmission of waves based on periodic arrays. The most obvious application is perhaps the design of Sonic Crystals Noise Barriers. Two different finite impedance surfaces have been analyzed in the work in order to observe the dependence of the wave propagation properties on the impedance of the surface.
  • The low-energy structure of 231Ac has been investigated by means of gamma ray spectroscopy following the beta-decay of 231Ra. Multipolarities of 28 transitions have been established by measuring conversion electrons with a mini-orange electron spectrometer. The decay scheme of 231Ra --> 231Ac has been constructed for the first time. The Advanced Time Delayed beta-gamma-gamma(t) method has been used to measure the half-lives of five levels. The moderately fast B(E1) transition rates derived suggest that the octupole effects, albeit weak, are still present in this exotic nucleus.