• Gaia Data Release 2 (DR2) provides a unique all-sky catalog of 550'737 variable stars, of which 151'761 are Long Period Variable (LPV) candidates with G variability amplitudes larger than 0.2 mag. About one fifth of the LPV candidates are Mira candidates, the majority of the rest being semi-regular variable candidates. For each source, G, BP and RP photometric time series are published, together with some LPV-specific attributes for the subset of 89'617 candidates with periods in G larger than 60 days. We describe this first Gaia catalog of LPV candidates, give an overview of its content, and present various validation checks. Various samples of LPVs are used to validate the catalog: a sample of well-studied very bright LPVs having AAVSO light curves concomitant with Gaia light curves, a sample of Gaia LPV candidates with good parallaxes, the ASAS_SN all-sky catalog of LPVs, and the OGLE-III catalogs of LPVs towards the Magellanic Clouds and the Galactic Bulge. The analyses of these samples show a good agreement between Gaia DR2 and literature periods. The same is globally true for bolometric corrections of M-type stars. The main contaminant to our DR2 catalog comes from Young Stellar Objects (YSOs) in the Solar vicinity (within ~1 kpc), their number in the whole catalog being only at the percent level. A cautious note is provided about parallax-dependent LPV attributes published in the catalog. This first Gaia catalog of LPVs about doubles the number of known LPVs with amplitudes larger than 0.2 mag, despite the conservative candidate selection criteria in order to prioritize low contamination over high completeness, and despite the limited DR2 time coverage compared to the long periods characteristic of LPVs. It also contains a small set of YSO candidates, which offers the serendipitous opportunity to study these objects at an early stage of the Gaia data releases.
  • Gaia second Data Release (DR2) presents a first mapping of full-sky RR Lyrae stars and Cepheids observed by the spacecraft during the initial 22 months of observations and publishes characteristic parameters derived for these sources by the Specific Objects Study (SOS) pipeline developed to validate and fully characterise Cepheids and RR Lyrae stars (SOS Cep&RRL) observed by Gaia. The SOS Cep&RRL processing uses tools such as the period-amplitude (PA) and the period-luminosity (PL) relations in the G-band. For the Gaia DR2 data processing we also used tools based on the G_BP and G_RP photometry, such as the period-Wesenheit (PW) relation in G,G_RP. Furthermore, we implemented the use of parallaxes working directly in parallax space and applied different PL, PW relations depending on the source position on sky, whether in the LMC, in the SMC or outside them. G, G_BP and G_RP time series photometry and characterisation by the SOS Cep&RRL pipeline (mean magnitudes and pulsation characteristics) are published in Gaia DR2 for a total of 150,359 sources distributed all over the sky: 9,575 are classified as Cepheids and 140,784 as RR Lyrae stars. These samples include also variables in 87 globular clusters and 12 dwarf galaxies. To the best of our knowledge, as of 25 April 2018, 50,570 of these variables (about 350 Cepheids and 50,220 RR Lyrae stars) do not have a known counterpart in the literature, hence they are likely new discoveries by Gaia. Furthermore, an estimate of the interstellar absorption is published for 54,272 fundamental mode RR Lyrae stars from a relation based on the amplitude of the light variation in the G-band and the star period. Photometric metal abundances ([Fe/H]) derived from the Fourier parameters of the light curves are also released for 64,932 RR Lyrae stars and for 3,738 fundamental-mode classical Cepheids with period shorter than 6.3 days.
  • We identify and investigate known ultracool stars and brown dwarfs that are being observed or indirectly constrained by the Gaia mission. These objects will be the core of the Gaia ultracool dwarf sample composed of all dwarfs later than M7 that Gaia will provide direct or indirect information on. We match known L and T dwarfs to the Gaia first data release, the Two Micron All Sky Survey and the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer AllWISE survey and examine the Gaia and infrared colours, along with proper motions, to improve spectral typing, identify outliers and find mismatches. There are 321 L and T dwarfs observed directly in the Gaia first data release, of which 10 are later than L7. This represents 45 % of all the known LT dwarfs with estimated Gaia G magnitudes brighter than 20.3 mag. We determine proper motions for the 321 objects from Gaia and the Two Micron All Sky Survey positions. Combining the Gaia and infrared magnitudes provides useful diagnostic diagrams for the determination of L and T dwarf physical parameters. We then search the Tycho-Gaia astrometric solution Gaia first data release subset to find any objects with common proper motions to known L and T dwarfs and a high probability of being related. We find 15 new candidate common proper motion systems.
  • We present an overview of the Specific Objects Study (SOS) pipeline developed within the Coordination Unit 7 (CU7) of the Gaia Data Processing and Analysis Consortium (DPAC), the coordination unit charged with the processing and analysis of variable sources observed by Gaia, to validate and fully characterise Cepheids and RR Lyrae stars observed by the spacecraft. We describe how the SOS for Cepheids and RR Lyrae stars (SOS Cep&RRL) was specifically tailored to analyse Gaia's G-band photometric time-series with a South Ecliptic Pole (SEP) footprint, which covers an external region of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). G-band time-series photometry and characterization by the SOS Cep&RRL pipeline (mean magnitude and pulsation characteristics) are published in Gaia Data Release 1 (Gaia DR1) for a total sample of 3,194 variable stars, 599 Cepheids and 2,595 RR Lyrae stars, of which 386 (43 Cepheids and 343 RR Lyrae stars) are new discoveries by Gaia. All 3,194 stars are distributed over an area extending 38 degrees on either side from a point offset from the centre of the LMC by about 3 degrees to the north and 4 degrees to the east. The vast majority, but not all, are located within the LMC. The published sample also includes a few bright RR Lyrae stars that trace the outer halo of the Milky Way in front of the LMC.
  • This paper continues our study of the foreground population to the Orion molecular clouds. The goal is to characterize the foreground population north of NGC 1981 and to investigate the star formation history in the large Orion star-forming region. We focus on a region covering about 25 square degrees, centered on the $\epsilon$ Orionis supergiant (HD 37128, B0\,Ia) and covering the Orion Belt asterism. We used a combination of optical (SDSS) and near-infrared (2MASS) data, informed by X-ray (\textit{XMM-Newton}) and mid-infrared (WISE) data, to construct a suite of color-color and color-magnitude diagrams for all available sources. We then applied a new statistical multiband technique to isolate a previously unknown stellar population in this region. We identify a rich and well-defined stellar population in the surveyed region that has about 2\,000 objects that are mostly M stars. We infer the age for this new population to be at least 5\, Myr and likely $\sim10$\,Myr and estimate a total of about 2\,500 members, assuming a normal IMF. This new population, which we call the Orion Belt population, is essentially extinction-free, disk-free, and its spatial distribution is roughly centered near $\epsilon$ Ori, although substructure is clearly present. The Orion Belt population is likely the low-mass counterpart to the Ori OB Ib subgroup. Although our results do not rule out Blaauw's sequential star formation scenario for Orion, we argue that the recently proposed blue streams scenario provides a better framework on which one can explain the Orion star formation region as a whole. We speculate that the Orion Belt population could represent the evolved counterpart of an Orion nebula-like cluster.
  • Stellar clusters are open windows to understand stellar evolution. Specifically, the change with time and the dependence on mass of different stellar properties. As such, they are our laboratories where different theories can be tested. We try to understand the origin of the connection between lithium depletion in F, G and K stars, rotation and activity, in particular in the Pleiades open cluster. We have collected all the relevant data in the literature, including information regarding rotation period, binarity and activity, and cross-matched with proper motions, multi-wavelength photometry and membership probability from the DANCe database. In order to avoid biases, only Pleiades single members with probabilities larger than p=0.75 have been included in the discussion. Results. The analysis confirms that there is a strong link between activity, rotation and the lithium equivalent width excess, specially for the range Lum(bol) = 0.5-0.2 Lsun (about K2-K7 spectral types or 0.75-0.95 Msun). It is not possible to disentangle these effects but we cannot exclude that the observed lithium overabundance is partially an observational effect due to enhanced activity, due to a large coverage by stellar spots induced by high rotation rates. Since a bona fide lithium enhancement is present in young, fast rotators, both activity and rotation should play a role in the lithium problem.
  • We present a new technique designed to take full advantage of the high dimensionality (photometric, astrometric, temporal) of the DANCe survey to derive self-consistent and robust membership probabilities of the Pleiades cluster. We aim at developing a methodology to infer membership probabilities to the Pleiades cluster from the DANCe multidimensional astro-photometric data set in a consistent way throughout the entire derivation. The determination of the membership probabilities has to be applicable to censored data and must incorporate the measurement uncertainties into the inference procedure. We use Bayes' theorem and a curvilinear forward model for the likelihood of the measurements of cluster members in the colour-magnitude space, to infer posterior membership probabilities. The distribution of the cluster members proper motions and the distribution of contaminants in the full multidimensional astro-photometric space is modelled with a mixture-of-Gaussians likelihood. We analyse several representation spaces composed of the proper motions plus a subset of the available magnitudes and colour indices. We select two prominent representation spaces composed of variables selected using feature relevance determination techniques based in Random Forests, and analyse the resulting samples of high probability candidates. We consistently find lists of high probability (p > 0.9975) candidates with $\approx$ 1000 sources, 4 to 5 times more than obtained in the most recent astro-photometric studies of the cluster. The methodology presented here is ready for application in data sets that include more dimensions, such as radial and/or rotational velocities, spectral indices and variability.
  • We present an automated classification of stars exhibiting periodic, non-periodic and irregular light variations. The Hipparcos catalogue of unsolved variables is employed to complement the training set of periodic variables of Dubath et al. with irregular and non-periodic representatives, leading to 3881 sources in total which describe 24 variability types. The attributes employed to characterize light-curve features are selected according to their relevance for classification. Classifier models are produced with random forests and a multistage methodology based on Bayesian networks, achieving overall misclassification rates under 12 per cent. Both classifiers are applied to predict variability types for 6051 Hipparcos variables associated with uncertain or missing types in the literature.
  • A complete periodic star extraction and classification scheme is set up and tested with the Hipparcos catalogue. The efficiency of each step is derived by comparing the results with prior knowledge coming from the catalogue or from the literature. A combination of two variability criteria is applied in the first step to select 17 006 variability candidates from a complete sample of 115 152 stars. Our candidate sample turns out to include 10 406 known variables (i.e., 90% of the total of 11 597) and 6600 contaminating constant stars. A random forest classification is used in the second step to extract 1881 (82%) of the known periodic objects while removing entirely constant stars from the sample and limiting the contamination of non-periodic variables to 152 stars (7.5%). The confusion introduced by these 152 non-periodic variables is evaluated in the third step using the results of the Hipparcos periodic star classification presented in a previous study (Dubath et al. [1]).
  • We present an evaluation of the performance of an automated classification of the Hipparcos periodic variable stars into 26 types. The sub-sample with the most reliable variability types available in the literature is used to train supervised algorithms to characterize the type dependencies on a number of attributes. The most useful attributes evaluated with the random forest methodology include, in decreasing order of importance, the period, the amplitude, the V-I colour index, the absolute magnitude, the residual around the folded light-curve model, the magnitude distribution skewness and the amplitude of the second harmonic of the Fourier series model relative to that of the fundamental frequency. Random forests and a multi-stage scheme involving Bayesian network and Gaussian mixture methods lead to statistically equivalent results. In standard 10-fold cross-validation experiments, the rate of correct classification is between 90 and 100%, depending on the variability type. The main mis-classification cases, up to a rate of about 10%, arise due to confusion between SPB and ACV blue variables and between eclipsing binaries, ellipsoidal variables and other variability types. Our training set and the predicted types for the other Hipparcos periodic stars are available online.
  • * Aims. We describe here the main functionalities of the LAEX (Laboratorio de Astrofisica Estelar y Exoplanetas/Laboratory for Stellar Astrophysics and Exoplanets) and NASA portals for CoRoT Public Data. The CoRoT archive at LAEX was opened to the community in January 2009 and is managed in the framework of the Spanish Virtual Observatory. NStED (NASA Star and Exoplanet Database) serves as the CoRoT portal for the US astronomical community. NStED is a general purpose stellar and exoplanet archive with the aim of providing support for NASA planet finding and characterisation goals, and the planning and support of NASA and other space missions. CoRoT data at LAEX and NStED can be accessed at http://sdc.laeff.inta.es/corotfa/ and http://nsted.ipac.caltech.edu,respectively. * Methods. Based on considerable experience with astronomical archives, the aforementioned archives are designed with the aim of delivering science-quality data in a simple and efficient way. * Results. LAEX and NStED not only provide access to CoRoT Public Data but furthermore serve a variety of observed and calculated astrophysical data. In particular, NStED provides scientifically validated information on stellar and planetary data related to the search for and characterization of extrasolar planets, and LAEX makes any information from Virtual Observatory services available to the astronomical community.
  • Context. Discovery of new variability classes in large surveys using multivariate statistics techniques such as clustering, relies heavily on the correct understanding of the distribution of known classes as point processes in parameter space. Aims. Our objective is to analyze the correspondence between the classical stellar variability types and the clusters found in the distribution of light curve parameters and colour indices of stars in the CoRoT exoplanet sample. The final aim is to help in the identification on new types of variability by first identifying the well known variables in the CoRoT sample. Methods. We apply unsupervised classification algorithms to identify clusters of variable stars from modes of the probability density distribution. We use reference variability databases (Hipparcos and OGLE) as a framework to calibrate the clustering methodology. Furthermore, we use the results from supervised classification methods to interpret the resulting clusters. Results.We interpret the clusters in the Hipparcos and OGLE LMC databases in terms of large-amplitude radial pulsators in the classical instability strip and of various types of eclipsing binaries. The Hipparcos data also provide clear distributions for low-amplitude nonradial pulsators. We show that the preselection of targets for the CoRoT exoplanet programme results in a completely different probability density landscape than the OGLE data, the interpretation of which involves mainly classes of low-amplitude variability in main-sequence stars. Our findings will be incorporated to improve the supervised classification used in the CoRoT catalogue production, once the existence of new classes or subtypes will be confirmed from complementary spectroscopic observations.
  • We aim to extend and test the classifiers presented in a previous work against an independent dataset. We complement the assessment of the validity of the classifiers by applying them to the set of OGLE light curves treated as variable objects of unknown class. The results are compared to published classification results based on the so-called extractor methods.Two complementary analyses are carried out in parallel. In both cases, the original time series of OGLE observations of the Galactic bulge and Magellanic Clouds are processed in order to identify and characterize the frequency components. In the first approach, the classifiers are applied to the data and the results analyzed in terms of systematic errors and differences between the definition samples in the training set and in the extractor rules. In the second approach, the original classifiers are extended with colour information and, again, applied to OGLE light curves. We have constructed a classification system that can process huge amounts of time series in negligible time and provide reliable samples of the main variability classes. We have evaluated its strengths and weaknesses and provide potential users of the classifier with a detailed description of its characteristics to aid in the interpretation of classification results. Finally, we apply the classifiers to obtain object samples of classes not previously studied in the OGLE database and analyse the results. We pay specific attention to the B-stars in the samples, as their pulsations are strongly dependent on metallicity.
  • The fast classification of new variable stars is an important step in making them available for further research. Selection of science targets from large databases is much more efficient if they have been classified first. Defining the classes in terms of physical parameters is also important to get an unbiased statistical view on the variability mechanisms and the borders of instability strips. Our goal is twofold: provide an overview of the stellar variability classes that are presently known, in terms of some relevant stellar parameters; use the class descriptions obtained as the basis for an automated `supervised classification' of large databases. Such automated classification will compare and assign new objects to a set of pre-defined variability training classes. For every variability class, a literature search was performed to find as many well-known member stars as possible, or a considerable subset if too many were present. Next, we searched on-line and private databases for their light curves in the visible band and performed period analysis and harmonic fitting. The derived light curve parameters are used to describe the classes and define the training classifiers. We compared the performance of different classifiers in terms of percentage of correct identification, of confusion among classes and of computation time. We describe how well the classes can be separated using the proposed set of parameters and how future improvements can be made, based on new large databases such as the light curves to be assembled by the CoRoT and Kepler space missions.
  • The Variable Star One-shot Project (VSOP) is aimed at (1) providing the variability type and spectral type of all unstudied variable stars, (2) process, publish, and make the data available as automatically as possible, and (3) generate serendipitous discoveries. This first paper describes the project itself, the acquisition of the data, the dataflow, the spectroscopic analysis and the on-line availability of the fully calibrated and reduced data. We also present the results on the 221 stars observed during the first semester of the project. We used the high-resolution echelle spectrographs HARPS and FEROS in the ESO La Silla Observatory (Chile) to survey known variable stars. Once reduced by the dedicated pipelines, the radial velocities are determined from cross correlation with synthetic template spectra, and the spectral types are determined by an automatic minimum distance matching to synthetic spectra, with traditional manual spectral typing cross-checks. The variability types are determined by manually evaluating the available light curves and the spectroscopy. In the future, a new automatic classifier, currently being developed by members of the VSOP team, based on these spectroscopic data and on the photometric classifier developed for the COROT and Gaia space missions, will be used. We confirm or revise spectral types of 221 variable stars from the GCVS. We identify 26 previously unknown multiple systems, among them several visual binaries with spectroscopic binary individual components. We present new individual results for the multiple systems V349 Vel and BC Gru, for the composite spectrum star V4385 Sgr, for the T-Tauri star V1045 Sco, and for DM Boo which we re-classify as a BY Draconis variable. The complete data release can be accessed via the VSOP web site.
  • In this work we present a system for the automatic classification of the light curves of eclipsing binaries. This system is based on a classification scheme that aims to separate eclipsing binary sistems according to their geometrical configuration in a modified version of the traditional classification scheme. The classification is performed by a Bayesian ensemble of neural networks trained with {\em Hipparcos} data of seven different categories including eccentric binary systems and two types of pulsating light curve morphologies.