• We performed a thorough analysis of the star formation activity in the young massive galaxy cluster RXJ1257+4738 at z=0.866, with emphasis on the relationship between the local environment of the cluster galaxies and their star formation activity. We present an optical and IR study that benefited from the large amount of data available for this cluster, including new OSIRIS/GTC and Herschel imaging observations. Using a optical-to-NIR multi-wavelength catalogue, we measured photometric redshifts through a chi2 SED-fitting procedure. We implemented a reliable and carefully chosen cluster membership selection criterion including Monte Carlo simulations and derived a sample of 292 reliable cluster member galaxies for which we measured the following properties: optical colours, stellar masses, ages, ultraviolet luminosities and local densities. Using the MIPS 24um and Herschel data, we measured total IR luminosities and SFR. Of the sample of 292 cluster galaxies, 38 show FIR emission with an SFR between 0.5 and 45 Msun/yr. The spatial distribution of the FIR emitters within the cluster density map and the filament-like overdensities observed suggest that RXJ1257 is not virialised, but is in the process of assembly. The average star formation as a function of the cluster environment parametrised by the local density of galaxies does not show any clear trend. However, the fraction of SF galaxies unveils that the cluster intermediate-density regions is preferred for the SF activity to enhance, since we observe a significant increase of the FIR-emitter fraction in this environment. Focusing on the optically red SF galaxies, we can support the interpretation of this population as dusty red galaxies, since we observe an appreciable difference in their extinction compared with the blue population.
  • The near-Earth asteroid (308635) 2005 YU55 is a potentially hazardous asteroid which was discovered in 2005 and passed Earth on November 8th 2011 at 0.85 lunar distances. This was the closest known approach by an asteroid of several hundred metre diameter since 1976 when a similar size object passed at 0.5 lunar distances. We observed 2005 YU55 from ground with a recently developed mid-IR camera (miniTAO/MAX38) in N- and Q-band and with the Submillimeter Array (SMA) at 1.3 mm. In addition, we obtained space observations with Herschel/PACS at 70, 100, and 160 micron. Our thermal measurements cover a wide range of wavelengths from 8.9 micron to 1.3 mm and were taken after opposition at phase angles between -97 deg and -18 deg. We performed a radiometric analysis via a thermophysical model and combined our derived properties with results from radar, adaptive optics, lightcurve observations, speckle and auxiliary thermal data. We find that (308635) 2005 YU55 has an almost spherical shape with an effective diameter of 300 to 312 m and a geometric albedo pV of 0.055 to 0.075. Its spin-axis is oriented towards celestial directions (lam_ecl, beta_ecl) = (60 deg +/- 30deg, -60 deg +/- 15 deg), which means it has a retrograde sense of rotation. The analysis of all available data combined revealed a discrepancy with the radar-derived size. Our radiometric analysis of the thermal data together with the problem to find a unique rotation period might be connected to a non-principal axis rotation. A low to intermediate level of surface roughness (r.m.s. of surface slopes in the range 0.1 - 0.3) is required to explain the available thermal measurements. We found a thermal inertia in the range 350-800 Jm^-2s^-0.5K^-1, very similar to the rubble-pile asteroid (25143) Itokawa and indicating a mixture of low conductivity fine regolith with larger rocks and boulders of high thermal inertia on the surface.
  • Star-formation in the galaxy populations of local massive clusters is reduced with respect to field galaxies, and tends to be suppressed in the core region. Indications of a reversal of the star-formation--density relation have been observed in a few z >1.4 clusters. Using deep imaging from 100-500um from PACS and SPIRE onboard Herschel, we investigate the infrared properties of spectroscopic and photo-z cluster members, and of Halpha emitters in XMMU J2235.3-2557, one of the most massive, distant, X-ray selected clusters known. Our analysis is based mostly on fitting of the galaxies spectral energy distribution in the rest-frame 8-1000um. We measure total IR luminosity, deriving star formation rates (SFRs) ranging from 89-463 Msun/yr for 13 galaxies individually detected by Herschel, all located beyond the core region (r >250 kpc). We perform a stacking analysis of nine star-forming members not detected by PACS, yielding a detection with SFR=48 Msun/yr. Using a color criterion based on a star-forming galaxy SED at the cluster redshift we select 41 PACS sources as candidate star-forming cluster members. We characterize a population of highly obscured SF galaxies in the outskirts of XMMU J2235.3-2557. We do not find evidence for a reversal of the SF-density relation in this massive, distant cluster.
  • Aimed at understanding the evolution of galaxies in clusters, the GLACE survey is mapping a set of optical lines ([OII]3727, [OIII]5007, Hbeta and Halpha/[NII] when possible) in several galaxy clusters at redshift around 0.40, 0.63 and 0.86, using the Tuneable Filters (TF) of the OSIRIS instrument (Cepa et al. 2005) at the 10.4m GTC telescope. This study will address key questions about the physical processes acting upon the infalling galaxies during the course of hierarchical growth of clusters. GLACE is already ongoing: we present some preliminary results on our observations of the galaxy cluster Cl0024+1654 at z = 0.395; on the other hand, GLACE@0.86 has been approved as ESO/GTC large project to be started in 2011.
  • Herschel was launched on 14 May 2009, and is now an operational ESA space observatory offering unprecedented observational capabilities in the far-infrared and submillimetre spectral range 55-671 {\mu}m. Herschel carries a 3.5 metre diameter passively cooled Cassegrain telescope, which is the largest of its kind and utilises a novel silicon carbide technology. The science payload comprises three instruments: two direct detection cameras/medium resolution spectrometers, PACS and SPIRE, and a very high-resolution heterodyne spectrometer, HIFI, whose focal plane units are housed inside a superfluid helium cryostat. Herschel is an observatory facility operated in partnership among ESA, the instrument consortia, and NASA. The mission lifetime is determined by the cryostat hold time. Nominally approximately 20,000 hours will be available for astronomy, 32% is guaranteed time and the remainder is open to the worldwide general astronomical community through a standard competitive proposal procedure.
  • Gravitational lensing by massive galaxy clusters allows study of the population of intrinsically faint infrared galaxies that lie below the sensitivity and confusion limits of current infrared and submillimeter telescopes. We present ultra-deep PACS 100 and 160 microns observations toward the cluster lens Abell 2218, to penetrate the Herschel confusion limit. We derive source counts down to a flux density of 1 mJy at 100 microns and 2 mJy at 160 microns, aided by strong gravitational lensing. At these levels, source densities are 20 and 10 beams/source in the two bands, approaching source density confusion at 160 microns. The slope of the counts below the turnover of the Euclidean-normalized differential curve is constrained in both bands and is consistent with most of the recent backwards evolutionary models. By integrating number counts over the flux range accessed by Abell 2218 lensing (0.94-35 mJy at 100 microns and 1.47-35 mJy at 160 microns, we retrieve a cosmic infrared background (CIB) surface brightness of ~8.0 and ~9.9 nW m^-2 sr^-1, in the respective bands. These values correspond to 55% (+/- 24%) and 77% (+/- 31%) of DIRBE direct measurements. Combining Abell 2218 results with wider/shallower fields, these figures increase to 62% (+/- 25%) and 88% (+/- 32%) CIB total fractions, resolved at 100 and 160 microns, disregarding the high uncertainties of DIRBE absolute values.
  • The Herschel Lensing Survey (HLS) will conduct deep PACS and SPIRE imaging of ~40 massive clusters of galaxies. The strong gravitational lensing power of these clusters will enable us to penetrate through the confusion noise, which sets the ultimate limit on our ability to probe the Universe with Herschel. Here, we present an overview of our survey and a summary of the major results from our Science Demonstration Phase (SDP) observations of the Bullet Cluster (z=0.297). The SDP data are rich, allowing us to study not only the background high-redshift galaxies (e.g., strongly lensed and distorted galaxies at z=2.8 and 3.2) but also the properties of cluster-member galaxies. Our preliminary analysis shows a great diversity of far-infrared/submillimeter spectral energy distributions (SEDs), indicating that we have much to learn with Herschel about the properties of galaxy SEDs. We have also detected the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect increment with the SPIRE data. The success of this SDP program demonstrates the great potential of the Herschel Lensing Survey to produce exciting results in a variety of science areas.
  • The massive cluster of galaxies Abell 2219 (z = 0.228) was observed at 14.3 $\mu$m with the Infrared Space Observatory and results were published by Barvainis et al. (1999). These observations have been reanalyzed using a method specifically designed for the detection of faint sources that had been applied to other clusters. Five new sources were detected and the resulting cumulative total of ten sources all have optical counterparts. The mid-infrared sources are identified with three cluster members, three foreground galaxies, an Extremely Red Object, a star and two galaxies of unknown redshift. The spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of the galaxies are fit with models from a selection, using the program GRASIL. Best-fits are obtained, in general, with models of galaxies with ongoing star formation. For three cluster members the infrared luminosities derived from the model SEDs are between ~5.7x10^10 Lsun and 1.4x10^11 Lsun, corresponding to infrared star formation rates between 10 and 24 Msun yr^-1. The two cluster galaxies that have optical classifications are in the Butcher-Oemler region of the color-magnitude diagramme. The three foreground galaxies have infrared luminosities between 1.5x10^10 Lsun and 9.4x10^10 Lsun yielding infrared star formation rates between 3 and 16 Msun yr^-1. Two of the foreground galaxies are located in two foreground galaxy enhancements (Boschin et al. 2004). Including Abell 2219, six distant clusters of galaxies have been mapped with ISOCAM and luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs) have been found in three of them. The presence of LIRGs in Abell 2219 strengthens the association between luminous infrared galaxies in clusters and recent or ongoing cluster merger activity.
  • Observations of the core of the massive cluster Cl 0024+1654, at a redshift z=0.39, were obtained with the Infrared Space Observatory using ISOCAM at 6.7 mum and 14.3 mum (hereafter 15 mum). Thirty five sources were detected at 15 mum and thirteen of them are spectroscopically identified with cluster galaxies. The remaining sources consist of four stars, one quasar, one foreground galaxy, three background galaxies and thirteen sources with unknown redshift. The ISOCAM sources have best-fit SEDs typical of spiral or starburst models observed 1 Gyr after the main starburst event. The median infrared luminosity of the twelve cluster galaxies is 1.0x10^11 Lsun, with 10 having infrared luminosity above 9x10^10 Lsun, and so lying near or above the 1x10^11 Lsun threshold for identification as a luminous infrared galaxy (LIRG). The [OII] star formation rates obtained for 3 cluster galaxies are one to two orders of magnitude lower than the infrared values, implying that most of the star formation is missed in the optical because it is enshrouded by dust in the starburst galaxy. The counterparts of about half of the 15 mum cluster sources are blue, luminous, star-forming systems and the type of galaxy that is usually associated with the Butcher-Oemler effect. Dust obscuration may be a major cause of the 15 mum sources appearing on the cluster main sequence. The majority of the ISOCAM sources in the Butcher-Oemler region of the colour-magnitude diagram are best fit by spiral-type SEDs whereas post-starburst models are preferred on the main sequence, with the starburst event probably triggered by interaction with one or more galaxies. Finally, the mid-infrared results on Cl 0024+1654 are compared with four other clusters observed with ISOCAM.
  • Further achievements of the XMM-Newton cross-calibration - XMM internal as well as with other X-ray missions - are presented. We explain the major changes in the new version SASv6.5 of the XMM-Newton science analysis system. The current status of the cross-calibration of the three EPIC cameras is shown. Using a large sample of blazars, the pn energy redistribution at low energy could be further calibrated, correcting the overestimation of fluxes in the lowest energy regime. In the central CCDs of the MOSs, patches were identified at the bore-sight positions, leading to an underestimation of the low energy fluxes. The further improvement in the understanding of the cameras resulted in a good agreement of the EPIC instruments down to lowest energies. The latest release of the SAS software package already includes corrections for both effects as shown in several examples of different types of sources. Finally the XMM internal cross-calibration is completed by the presentation of the current cross-calibration status between EPIC and RGS instruments. Major efforts have been made in cross-calibrations with other X-ray missions, most importantly with Chandra, of course, but also with currently observing satellites like Swift.
  • Markarian (Mkn) 297 is a complex system with two interacting galaxies. Observations were made with ISO using ISOCAM, ISOPHOT and LWS. We present ISOCAM maps at 6.7, 7.7, 12 and 14.3 microns which, with PHT-S spectrometry of the central interacting region, probe the dust obscured star formation and dust properties. ISOCAM reveals that the strongest emission region in the four MIR bands is completely unremarkable at visible and near-IR (e.g. 2MASS) wavelengths, and does not coincide with the nuclear region of either colliding galaxy. It shares this striking characteristic with the overlap region of the colliding galaxies in the Antennae (NGC 4038, 4039), the intragroup region of Stephan's Quintet, and IC 694 in the interacting system Arp 299. At 15 microns, the hidden source in Mkn 297 is, respectively, 14.6 and 3.8 times more luminous than the hidden sources in the Antennae (NGC 4038/4039) and Stephan's Quintet. Numerical simulations indicate that we see the Mkn 297 interaction about 1.5 x 10e8 years after the collision. ISOCAM shows knots and ridges of emission. The 14.3/7.7 micron ratio map implies widespread strong star formation. Strong emission features were detected in the ISOPHOT spectrum, while [OI], [OIII] and [CII] emission lines were seen with LWS. Using data from the three instruments, luminosities and masses for two dust components were determined. The total infrared luminosity is approximately 10e11 L_sol, marginally a LIRG. A 1979 supernova generated one of the most powerful known radio remnants (SN 1982aa) close to the strongest MIR source and identified with star forming region 14 in the optical. This exceptional supernova explosion may have been accompanied by a GRB, and a search for a GRB in this direction in contemporaneous satellite data is recommended.
  • Starting with nearby galaxy clusters like Virgo and Coma, and continuing out to the furthest galaxy clusters for which ISO results have yet been published ($z=0.56$), we discuss the development of knowledge of the infrared and associated physical properties of galaxy clusters from early IRAS observations, through the "ISO-era" to the present, in order to explore the status of ISO's contribution to this field. Relevant IRAS and ISO programmes are reviewed, addressing both the cluster galaxies and the still-very-limited evidence for an infrared-emitting intra-cluster medium. ISO made important advances in knowledge of both nearby and distant galaxy clusters, such as the discovery of a major cold dust component in Virgo and Coma cluster galaxies, the elaboration of the correlation between dust emission and Hubble-type, and the detection of numerous Luminous Infrared Galaxies (LIRGs) in several distant clusters. These and consequent achievements are underlined and described. We recall that, due to observing time constraints, ISO's coverage of higher-redshift galaxy clusters to the depths required to detect and study statistically significant samples of cluster galaxies over a range of morphological types could not be comprehensive and systematic, and such systematic coverage of distant clusters will be an important achievement of the Spitzer Observatory.
  • Observations of four WR galaxies (NGC 5430, NGC 6764, Mrk 309 and VII Zw 19) using the Infrared Space Observatory are presented here. ISOCAM maps of NGC 5430, Mrk 309 and NGC 6764 revealed the location of star formation regions in each of these galaxies. ISOPHOT spectral observations from 4 to 12 microns detected the ubiquitous PAH bands in the nuclei of the targets and several of the disk star forming regions, while LWS spectroscopy detected [OI] and [CII] emission lines from two galaxies, NGC 5430 and NGC 6764. Using a combination of ISO and IRAS flux densities, a dust model based on the sum of modified blackbody components was successfully fitted to the available data. These models were then used to calculate new values for the total IR luminosities for each galaxy, the size of the various dust populations, and the global SFR. The derived flux ratios, the SFRs, the high L(PAH)/L(40-120 microns) and F(PAH 7.7 microns)/F(7.7 microns continuum) values suggest that most of these galaxies are home to only a compact burst of star formation. The exception is NGC 6764, whose F(PAH 7.7 microns)/F(7.7 microns continuum) value of 1.22 is consistent with the presence of an AGN, yet the L(PAH)/L(40-120 microns) is more in line with a starburst, a finding in line with a compact low-luminosity AGN dominated by the starburst.
  • The intense radiation from a gamma-ray burst (GRB) is shown to be capable of melting stony material at distances up to 300 light years which subsequently cool to form chondrules. These conditions were created in the laboratory for the first time when millimeter sized pellets were placed in a vacuum chamber in the white synchrotron beam at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF). The pellets were rapidly heated in the X-ray and gamma-ray furnace to above 1400 C melted and cooled. This process heats from the inside unlike normal furnaces. The melted spherical samples were examined with a range of techniques and found to have microstructural properties similar to the chondrules that come from meteorites. This experiment demonstrates that GRBs can melt precursor material to form chondrules that may subsequently influence the formation of planets. This work extends the field of laboratory astrophysics to include high power synchrotron sources.
  • Chondrules are millimeter sized objects of spherical to irregular shape that constitute the major component of chondritic meteorites that originate in the region between Mars and Jupiter and which fall to Earth. They appear to have solidified rapidly from molten or partially molten drops. The heat source that melted the chondrules remains uncertain. The intense radiation from a gamma-ray burst (GRB) is capable of melting material at distances up to 300 light years. These conditions were created in the laboratory for the first time when millimeter sized pellets were placed in a vacuum chamber in the white synchrotron beam at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility. The pellets were rapidly heated in the X-ray and gamma-ray furnace to above 1400C melted and cooled. This process heats from the inside unlike normal furnaces. The melted spherical samples were examined with a range of techniques and found to have microstructural properties similar to the chondrules that come from meteorites. This experiment demonstrates that GRBs can melt precursor material to form chondrules that may subsequently influence the formation of planets. This work extends the field of laboratory astrophysics to include high power synchrotron sources.
  • ESA's large X-ray space observatory XMM-Newton is in its fifth year of operations. We give a general overview of the status of calibration of the five X-ray instruments and the Optical Monitor. A main point of interest in the last year became the cross-calibration between the instruments. A cross-calibration campaign started at the XMM-Newton Science Operation Centre at the European Space Astronomy Centre in collaboration with the Instrument Principle Investigators provides a first systematic comparison of the X-ray instruments EPIC and RGS for various kind of sources making also an initial assessment in cross calibration with other X-ray observatories.
  • We observed the cluster Abell 2218 (z=0.175), with ISOCAM on board the Infrared Space Observatory, using two filters with reference wavelengths of 6.7 and 14.3 microns. We detected 67 extragalactic mid-infrared sources. Using the ``GRASIL'' models of Silva et al. (1998) we have obtained acceptable and well constrained fits to the observed spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of 41 of these sources, for which additional optical/near-infrared magnitudes, and, in some cases, redshifts, were available. We have then determined the total infrared luminosities and star formation rates (SFRs) of these 41 sources, of which 27 are cluster members and 14 are field galaxies at a median redshift z~0.6. The SEDs of most of the ISOCAM cluster members are best fit by models with negligible star formation in the last ~1 Gyr. The 7 faintest cluster members have a slightly higher, but still very mild, star-formation activity. The ISOCAM-selected cluster galaxies appear to be an unbiased subsample of the overall cluster population. If A2218 is undergoing a merger, as suggested by some optical and X-ray analyses, then this merger does not seem to affect the mid-infrared properties of its galaxies. The SEDs of most ISOCAM-selected field sources are best fit by models with significant ongoing (and recent) star formation, resembling those of massive star-forming spirals or (post)starburst galaxies. Their median SFR is 22 solar masses per year. Eight of the 14 field sources are Luminous IR Galaxies. (Abridged)
  • ISOCAM was used to perform a deep survey through three gravitationally lensing clusters of galaxies. Nearly seventy sq. arcmin were covered over the clusters A370, A2218 and A2390. We present maps and photometry at 6.7 & 14.3 microns, showing a total of 145 mid-IR sources and the associated source counts. The 15 micron counts reach the faintest level yet recorded. All sources have counterparts in the optical or near-IR. Models of the clusters were used to correct for the effects of lensing, which increases the sensitivity of the survey. Seven of fifteen SCUBA sources were detected at 15 microns. Five have redshift between 0.23 & 2.8, with a median of 0.9. The field sources were counted to a lensing-corrected sensitivity of 30 microJy at 15 microns, and 14 microJy at 7 microns. The counts, corrected for completeness, contamination by cluster sources and lensing, confirm and extend findings of an excess by a factor of ten in the 15 micron population with respect to source models with no evolution. Source redshifts are mostly between 0.4 and 1.5. For the counts at 7 microns, integrating from 14 microJy to 460 microJy, we resolve 0.49+/-0.2 nW.m^(-2).sr^(-1) of the infrared background light (IBL) into discrete sources. At 15 microns we include the counts from other ISOCAM surveys to integrate from 30 microJy to 50 mJy, two to three times deeper than unlensed surveys, to resolve 2.7+/-0.62 nW.m^(-2).sr^(-1) of the IBL. These values are 10% and 55%, respectively, of the upper limit to the IBL, derived from photon-photon pair production of the TeV gamma rays from BL-Lac sources on the IBL photons. However, recent detections of TeV gamma rays from the z=0.129 BL Lac H1426+428 suggest that the 15 micron background reported implies substantial absorption of TeV photons from that source.
  • Hickson Compact Group (HCG) 31, consisting of the Wolf-Rayet galaxy NGC 1741 and its irregular dwarf companions, was observed using the Infrared Space Observatory. The deconvolved ISOCAM maps of the galaxies using the 7.7 micron and 14.3 micron (LW6 and LW3) filters are presented, along with ISOPHOT spectrometry of the central starburst region of NGC 1741 and the nucleus of galaxy HCG 31A. Strong mid-IR emission was detected from the central burst in NGC 1741, along with strong PAH features and a blend of features including [S IV] at 10.5 micron. The 14.3/6.75 micron flux ratio, where the 6.75 micron flux was synthesized from the PHT-S spectrum, and 14.3/7.7 micron flux ratios suggest that the central burst within NGC 1741 may be moving towards the post-starburst phase. Diagnostic tools including the ratio of the integrated PAH luminosity to the 40 to 120 micron infrared luminosity and the far-infrared colours reveal that despite the high surface brightness of the nucleus, the properties of NGC 1741 can be explained in terms of a starburst and do not require the presence of an AGN. The Tycho catalogue star TYC 04758-466-1, with m$_{V}$ = 11.3 and spectral type F6, was detected at 7.7 and 14.3 microns.
  • We present mid- and far-IR photometry of the high-redshift (z=4.69) dusty quasar BR1202-0725. The quasar was detected in the near-IR, at a flux level (0.7+/-0.2 mJy) consistent with an average Radio-Quiet Quasar at it's redshift. Only upper limits for the emission were obtained in the far-IR. These upper limits, when combined with data from ground-based telescopes, are the first direct evidence for a turn-over in the far-IR emission and hence confirm that a black-body dominates the SED at FIR wavelengths. This black-body is most probably cool dust, constrained to have a temperature below 80K, for a beta of 1.5.
  • We present photometric ISO 60 and 170um measurements, complemented by some IRAS data at 60um, of a sample of 84 nearby main-sequence stars of spectral class A, F, G and K in order to determine the incidence of dust disks around such main-sequence stars. Of the stars younger than 400 Myr one in two has a disk; for the older stars this is true for only one in ten. We conclude that most stars arrive on the main sequence surrounded by a disk; this disk then decays in about 400 Myr. Because (i) the dust particles disappear and must be replenished on a much shorter time scale and (ii) the collision of planetesimals is a good source of new dust, we suggest that the rapid decay of the disks is caused by the destruction and escape of planetesimals. We suggest that the dissipation of the disk is related to the heavy bombardment phase in our Solar System. Whether all stars arrive on the main sequence surrounded by a disk cannot be established: some very young stars do not have a disk. And not all stars destroy their disk in a similar way: some stars as old as the Sun still have significant disks.
  • The high redshift (z=0.997) blazar B2 1308+326 was observed contemporaneously at x-ray, optical and radio wavelengths in June 1996. The x-ray observations were performed with ASCA. The ASCA results were found to be consistent with reanalysed data from two earlier ROSAT observations. The combined ASCA and ROSAT data reveal an x-ray spectrum that is best fit by a broken power law with absorber model. The break in the x-ray spectrum is interpreted, to be the emerging importance of inverse Compton (IC) emission which dominates the ASCA spectrum. The faint optical state reported for these observations (m_V=18.3+/-0.25) is incompatible with the high synchrotron flux previously detected by ROSAT. The IC emission detected by both ROSAT and ASCA was not significantly affected by the large change in the synchrotron component. MgII emission was detected with an equivalent width (EW) significantly different from previously reported values. Absorption at a level of in excess of the Galactic value was detected, indicating the possible presence of a foreground absorber. A gravitational microlensing scenario cannot therefore be ruled out for this blazar. B2 1308+326 could be a typical radio-selected BL Lac in terms of peak synchrotron frequency and optical and radio variability but its high bolometric luminosity, variable line emission and high Doppler boost factor make it appear more like a quasar than a BL Lac. It is suggested that B2 1308+326 be considered as the prototype of this class of composite source.
  • The interacting system Arp 284 consisting of the Wolf-Rayet galaxy NGC 7714 and its irregular companion NGC 7715 was observed using the Infrared Space Observatory. Deconvolved ISOCAM maps of the galaxies using the 14.3, 7.7 and 15 micron LW3, LW6 and LW9 filters, along with ISOPHOT spectrometry of the nuclear region of NGC 7714 were obtained and are presented. Strong ISOCAM emission was detected from the central source in NGC 7714, along with strong PAH features, the emission line [Ar II], molecular hydrogen at 9.66 microns and a blend of features including [S IV] at 10.6 microns. IR emission was not detected from the companion galaxy NGC 7715, the bridge linking the two galaxies or from the partial stellar ring in NGC 7714 where emission ceases abruptly at the interface between the disk and the ring. The morphology of the system can be well described by an off-centre collision between the two galaxies. The LW3/LW2, where the LW2 flux was synthesized from the PHOT-SL spectrum, LW9/LW6 and LW3/LW6 ratios suggest that the central burst within NGC 7714 is moving towards the post-starburst phase, in agreement with the age of the burst. Diagnostic tools including the ratio of the integrated PAH luminosity to the 40 to 120 microns infrared luminosity and the far-infrared colours reveal that despite the high surface brightness of the nucleus, the properties of NGC 7714 can be explained in terms of a starburst and do not require the prescence an AGN.
  • The Infrared Space Observatory observed the field of the $\gamma$--ray burst GRB 970508 with the CAM and PHT instruments on May 21 and 24, 1997 and with PHT in three filters in November 1997. A source at 60 $\mu$m (flux in May of $66\pm 10$ mJy) was detected near the position of the host galaxy of this $\gamma$--ray burst. The source was detected again in November 1997, at a marginally lower flux ($43\pm 13$ mJy). A Galactic cirrus origin and a stellar origin for the emission can be ruled out on the basis of the infrared colours. The marginal evidence for variability in the 60 $\mu$m flux between May and November is not sufficient to warrant interpretation of the source as transient fireball emission. However, the infrared colours are physically reasonable if attributed to conventional dust emission from a single blackbody source. The probability of detecting a 60 $\mu$m by chance in a PHT beam down to a detection limit of 50 mJy is $\sim 5\times 10^{-3}$. If the source is at the redshift of the host galaxy of the $\gamma$--ray burst the fluxes and upper limits at wavelengths from 12 $\mu$m to 170 $\mu$m indicate it is an ultraluminous infrared galaxy (L$_{\rm ir} \sim 2\times 10^{12}$ L$_{\sun}$). The star formation rate is estimated to be several hundred solar masses per year, depending significantly on model-dependent parameters. If this source is associated with the host galaxy of GRB 970508, progenitor models which associate GRBs with star-forming regions are favoured.
  • The sample of IRAS galaxies with spectral energy distributions that peak near 60 microns are called Sixty Micron Peakers (SMPs or 60PKs). Their generally peculiar and amorphous morphologies, hot dust and lack of a cirrus component have been interpreted as being indicative of a recent interaction/merger event. Mid-infrared spectra of eight SMPs, obtained with ISOPHOT-S in the ~2-11 micron band are presented. Four of the observed sources are H II region-like (H2) galaxies, three are Seyfert 2 and one is unclassified. Emission attributed to Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) at 6.2, 7.7 and 8.6 micron is ubiquitous in the spectra. The PHOT-S spectrum of the H2 galaxy IRAS 23446+1519 exhibits a bright 11.04 micron line and an 8.6 micron feature of comparable size to its 7.7 micron feature. [S IV] emission at 10.5 micron was detected in three of four H2 galaxies and in one Seyfert 2 galaxy. The ratio of the 7.7 \textmu m PAH feature to the continuum at 7.7 micron (PAH L/C) divides the eight SMPs at a ratio greater than 0.8 for H2 and less than 0.8 for Seyfert galaxies. An anti-correlation between PAH L/C and the ratio of the continuum flux at 5.9 micron to the flux at 60 micron is found, similar to that found in ultraluminous infrared galaxies. Silicate absorption at approximately 9.7 micron was observed in the Seyfert 2 galaxy, IRAS 04385-0828 and in IRAS 03344-2103. The previously unclassified SMP galaxy IRAS 03344-2103 is probably a Seyfert 2.