• Pre-main sequence stars are variable sources. In stars with disks, this variability is related to the morphology of the inner circumstellar region (<0.1 AU) and that of the photosphere and corona, all impossible to be spatially resolved with present day techniques. This has been the main motivation for the Coordinated Synoptic Investigation of NGC 2264. In this paper, we focus on the stars with disks. We analyze the X-ray spectral properties extracted during optical bursts and dips in order to unveil the nature of these phenomena. We analyze simultaneous CoRoT and Chandra/ACIS-I observations to search for coherent optical and X-ray flux variability in stars with disks. Then, stars are analyzed in two different samples. In stars with variable extinction, we look for a simultaneous increase of optical extinction and X-ray absorption during the optical dips; in stars with accretion bursts, we search for soft X-ray emission and increasing X-ray absorption during the bursts. Results. We find evidence for coherent optical and X-ray flux variability among the stars with variable extinction. In 9/24 stars with optical dips, we observe a simultaneous increase of X-ray absorption and optical extinction. In seven dips, it is possible to calculate the NH/AV ratio in order to infer the composition of the obscuring material. In 5/20 stars with optical accretion bursts, we observe increasing soft X-ray emission during the bursts that we associate to the emission of accreting gas. It is not surprising that these properties are not observed in all the stars with dips and bursts, since favorable geometric configurations are required. The observed variable absorption during the dips is mainly due to dust-free material in accretion streams. In stars with accretion bursts, we observe on average a larger soft X-ray spectral component not observed in non accreting stars.
  • We present radiation transfer models of rotating young stellar objects (YSOs) with hotspots in their atmospheres, inner disk warps and other 3-D effects in the nearby circumstellar environment. Our models are based on the geometry expected from the magneto-accretion theory, where material moving inward in the disk flows along magnetic field lines to the star and creates stellar hotspots upon impact. Due to rotation of the star and magnetosphere, the disk is variably illuminated. We compare our model light curves to data from the Spitzer YSOVAR project (Morales-Calderon et al. 2014, Cody et al. 2014) to determine if these processes can explain the variability observed at optical and mid-infrared wavelengths in young stars. We focus on those variables exhibiting "dipper" behavior that may be periodic, quasi-periodic, or aperiodic. We find that the stellar hotspot size and temperature affects the optical and near-infrared light curves, while the shape and vertical extent of the inner disk warp affects the mid-IR light curve variations. Clumpy disk distributions with non-uniform fractal density structure produce more stochastic light curves. We conclude that the magneto-accretion theory is consistent with certain aspects of the multi-wavelength photometric variability exhibited by low-mass YSOs. More detailed modeling of individual sources can be used to better determine the stellar hotspot and inner disk geometries of particular sources.
  • We present an XMM-Newton survey of the part of Orion A cloud south of the Orion Nebula. This survey includes the Lynds 1641 (L1641) dark cloud, a region of the Orion A cloud with very few massive stars and hence a relatively low ambient UV flux, and the region around the O9 III star Iota Orionis. In addition to proprietary data, we used archival XMM data of the Orion Nebula Cluster (ONC) to extend our analysis to a major fraction of the Orion A cloud. We have detected 1060 X-ray sources in L1641 and Iota Ori region. About 94% of the sources have 2MASS & Spitzer counterparts, 204 and 23 being Class II and Class I or protostars objects, respectively. In addition, we have identified 489 X-ray sources as counterparts to Class III candidates, given they are bright in X-rays and appear as normal photospheres at mid-IR wavelengths. The remaining 205 X-ray sources are likely distant AGNs or other galactic sources not related to Orion A. We find that Class III candidates appear more concentrated in two main clusters in L1641. The first cluster of Class III stars is found toward the northern part of L1641, concentrated around Iota Ori. The stars in this cluster are more evolved than those in the Orion Nebula. We estimate a distance of 300-320 pc for this cluster and thus it is closer than the Orion A cloud. Another cluster rich in Class III stars is located in L1641 South and appears to be a slightly older cluster embedded in the Orion A cloud. Furthermore, other evolved Class III stars are found north of the ONC toward NGC 1977.
  • Aims. The brown dwarf (BD) formation process has not yet been completely understood. To shed more light on the differences and similarities between star and BD formation processes, we study and compare the disk fraction among both kinds of objects over a large angular region in the Taurus cloud. In addition, we examine the spatial distribution of stars and BD relative to the underlying molecular gas Methods. In this paper, we present new and updated photometry data from the Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) aboard the Spitzer Space Telescope on 43 BDs in the Taurus cloud, and recalculate of the BD disk fraction in this region. We also useed recently available CO mm data to study the spatial distribution of stars and BDs relative to the cloud's molecular gas. Results. We find that the disk fraction among BDs in the Taurus cloud is 41 \pm 12%, a value statistically consistent with the one among TTS (58 \pm 9%). We find that BDs in transition from a state where they have a disk to a diskless state are rare, and we study one isolated example of a transitional disk with an inner radius of \approx 0.1 AU (CFHT BD Tau 12, found via its relatively small mid-IR excess compared to most members of Taurus that have disks. We find that BDs are statistically found in regions of similar molecular gas surface density to those associated with stars. Furthermore, we find that the gas column density distribution is almost identical for stellar and substellar objects with and without disks.
  • We have used Spitzer/IRAC to conduct a photometric monitoring program of the IC1396A dark globule in order to study the mid-IR (3.6 - 8 micron) variability of the heavily embedded Young Stellar Objects (YSOs) present in that area. We obtained light curves covering a 14 day timespan with a twice daily cadence for 69 YSOs, and continuous light curves with approximately 12 second cadence over 7 hours for 38 YSOs. Typical accuracies for our relative photometry were 1-2% for the long timespan data and a few mmag, corresponding to less than 0.5%, for the 7 hour continuous "staring-mode" data. More than half of the YSOs showed detectable variability, with amplitudes from ~0.05 mag to ~0.2 mag. About thirty percent of the YSOs showed quasi-sinusoidal light curve shapes with apparent periods from 5-12 days and light curve amplitudes approximately independent of wavelength over the IRAC bandpasses. We have constructed models which simulate the time dependent spectral energy distributions of Class I and I I YSOs in order to attempt to explain these light curves. Based on these models, the apparently periodic light curves are best explained by YSO models where one or two high latitude photospheric spots heat the inner wall of the circumstellar disk, and where we view the disk at fairly large inclination angle. Disk inhomogeneities, such as increasing the height where the accretion funnel flows to the stellar hotspot, enhances the light curve modulations. The other YSOs in our sample show a range of light curve shapes, some of which are probably due to varying accretion rate or disk shadowing events. One star, IC1396A-47, shows a 3.5 hour periodic light curve; this object may be a PMS Delta Scuti star.
  • It is still debated whether star formation process depends on environment. In particular it is yet unclear whether star formation in the outer Galaxy, where the environmental conditions are, theoretically, less conducive, occurs in the same way as in the inner Galaxy. We investigate the population of NGC1893, a young cluster ~3-4 Myr in the outer part of the Galaxy (galactic radius >11 Kpc), to explore the effects of environmental conditions on star forming regions. We present infrared observations acquired using the IRAC camera onboard the Spitzer Space Telescope and analyze the color-color diagrams to establish the membership of stars with excesses. We also merge this information with that obtained from Chandra ACIS-I observations, to identify the Class III population. We find that the cluster is very rich, with 242 PMS Classical T-Tauri stars and 7 Class 0/I stars. We identify 110 Class III candidate cluster members in the ACIS-I field of view. We estimate a disk fraction for NGC1893 of about 67%, similar to fractions calculated for nearby star forming regions of the same age. Although environmental conditions are unfavorable, star formation can clearly be very successful in the outer Galaxy, allowing creation of a very rich cluster like NGC1893.
  • Most stars form as members of large associations within dense, very cold (10-100 K) molecular clouds. The nearby giant molecular cloud in Orion hosts several thousand stars of ages less than a few million years, many of which are located in or around the famous Orion Nebula, a prominent gas structure illuminated and ionized by a small group of massive stars (the Trapezium). We present X-ray observations obtained with the X-ray Multi-Mirror satellite XMM-Newton revealing that a hot plasma with a temperature of 1.7-2.1 million K pervades the southwest extension of the nebula. The plasma, originating in the strong stellar winds from the Trapezium, flows into the adjacent interstellar medium. This X-ray outflow phenomenon must be widespread throughout our Galaxy.
  • We report on accretion- and outflow-related X-rays from T Tauri stars, based on results from the "XMM-Newton Extended Survey of the Taurus Molecular Cloud." X-rays potentially form in shocks of accretion streams near the stellar surface, although we hypothesize that direct interactions between the streams and magnetic coronae may occur as well. We report on the discovery of a "soft excess" in accreting T Tauri stars supporting these scenarios. We further discuss a new type of X-ray source in jet-driving T Tauri stars. It shows a strongly absorbed coronal component and a very soft, weakly absorbed component probably related to shocks in microjets. The excessive coronal absorption points to dust-depletion in the accretion streams.
  • We have conducted a photometric monitoring program of 3 field late-L brown dwarfs looking for evidence of non-axisymmetric structure or temporal variability in their photospheres. The observations were performed using Spitzer/IRAC 4.5 and 8 micron bandpasses and were designed to cover at least one rotational period of each object. One-sigma RMS (root mean squared) uncertainties of less than 3 mmag at 4.5 micron and around 9 mmag at 8 micron were achieved. Two out of the three objects studied exhibit some modulation in their light curves at 4.5 micron - but not 8 micron - with periods of 7.4 hr and 4.6 hr and peak-to-peak amplitudes of 10 mmag and 8 mmag. Although the lack of detectable 8 micron variation suggests an instrumental origin for the detected variations, the data may nevertheless still be consistent with intrinsic variability since the shorter wavelength IRAC bandpasses probe more deeply into late L dwarf atmospheres than the longer wavelengths. A cloud feature occupying a small percentage (1-2 %) of the visible hemisphere could account for the observed amplitude of variation. If, instead, the variability is indeed instrumental in origin, then our non-variable L dwarfs could be either completely covered with clouds or objects whose clouds are smaller and uniformly distributed. Such scenarios would lead to very small photometric variations. Followup IRAC photometry at 3.6 and 5.8 micron bandpasses should distinguish between the two cases. In any event, the present observations provide the most sensitive search to date for structure in the photospheres of late-L dwarfs at mid-IR wavelengths, and our photometry provides stringent upper limits to the extent to which the photospheres of these transition L dwarfs are structured.
  • Fluxes and upper limits in the wavelength range from 3.6 to 70 microns from the Spitzer Space Telescope are provided for twenty solar-mass Pleiades members. One of these stars shows a probable mid-IR excess and two others have possible excesses, presumably due to circumstellar debris disks. For the star with the largest, most secure excess flux at MIPS wavelengths, HII1101, we derive Log(L[dust]/L[Sun]) ~ -3.8 and an estimated debris disk mass of 4.2 x 10^-5 M(Earth) for an assumed uniform dust grain size of 10 microns If the stars with detected excesses are interpreted as stars with relatively recent, large collision events producing a transient excess of small dust particles, the frequency of such disk transients is about ~ 10 % for our ~ 100 Myr, Pleiades G dwarf sample. For the stars without detected 24-70 micron excesses, the upper limits to their fluxes correspond to approximate 3 sigma upper limits to their disk masses of 6 x 10^-6 M(Earth) using the MIPS 24 micron upper limit, or 2 x 10^-4 M(Earth) using the MIPS 70 micron limit. These upper limit disk masses (for "warm" and "cold" dust, respectively) are roughly consistent, but somewhat lower than, predictions of a heuristic model for the evolution of an "average" solar-mass star's debris disk based on extrapolation backwards in time from current properties of the Sun's Kuiper belt.