• Ultrafast pump-probe experiments open the possibility to track fundamental material behavior like changes in its electronic configuration in real time. So far, such measurements have widely relied on high harmonic generation (HHG) with ultrashort laser pulses, limiting the achievable wavelength range to the extreme ultraviolet regime. However, to directly excite site-specific core states of molecules or more complex systems, photon energies in the water window and above are required. Novel light sources based on laser-driven electron accelerators have demonstrated bright radiation production over a wide energy range. Given the phase space of the electron bunches could be shaped in an adequate way, these sources would also be suitable for high-energy ultrafast pump-probe experimentation. Here, we report for the first time on the simultaneous generation of two monoenergetic electron bunches with individually tunable energy up to several hundred MeV. Due to the underlying injection physics, the lengths of the bunches as well as their temporal separation inherently amount to femtoseconds. In combination with established beam-handling and insertion devices, these results pave the way to laboratory-scale multi-beam experiments with unprecedented scope in energy tuning and time resolution.
  • We report on systematic and high-precision measurements of dephasing, an effect that fundamentally limits the performance of laser wakefield accelerators. Utilizing shock-front injection, a technique providing stable, tunable and high-quality electron bunches, acceleration and deceleration of few-MeV quasi-monoenergetic beams were measured with sub-5-fs and 8-fs laser pulses. Typical density dependent electron energy evolution with 65-300 micrometers dephasing length and 6-20 MeV peak energy was observed and is well described with a simple model.
  • Brilliant X-ray sources are of great interest for many research fields from biology via medicine to material research. The quest for a cost-effective, brilliant source with unprecedented temporal resolution has led to the recent realization of various high-intensity-laser-driven X-ray beam sources. Here we demonstrate the first all-laser-driven, energy-tunable and quasi-monochromatic X-ray source based on Thomson backscattering. This is a decisive step beyond previous results, where the emitted radiation exhibited an uncontrolled broad energy distribution. In the experiment, one part of the laser beam was used to drive a few-fs bunch of quasi-monoenergetic electrons from a Laser-Wakefield Accelerator (LWFA), while the remainder was scattered off the bunch in a near-counter-propagating geometry. When the electron energy was tuned from 10-50 MeV, narrow-bandwidth X-ray spectra peaking at 5-35keV were directly measured, limited in photon energy by the sensitivity curve of our X-ray detector. Due to the ultrashort LWFA electron bunches, these beams exhibit few-fs pulse duration.
  • The tunnelling of an electron through a suppressed atomic potential followed by its motion in the continuum, is the fundamental mechanism underlying strong-field laser-atom/molecule interactions. Due to its quantum nature, the interaction is governed by the phase of the released electron wave-packets. Thus, detailed mapping of the electron wave-packet interferences provides essential insight into the physics underlying the interaction. A process which is providing access to the intricacies of the interaction is the generation of high order harmonics of the laser frequency. The phase-amplitude distribution of the emitted extreme-ultraviolet (EUV), carries the complete information about the harmonic generation process and vice-versa. Thus, the visualization of the EUV-spatial-amplitude-distribution, as it results from interfering electron wave-packet contributions, is of crucial importance. Restrictions to this accomplishment are due to the spatially integrating measurement approaches applied so far, that average out the phase effects in the generation process. In this work, we demonstrate a method which overcomes this obstacle. An EUV-spatial-amplitude-distribution-image is induced from the imprint on the measured spatial distribution of ions, produced through EUV-photon ionization of atoms. Interference extremes in the image carry phase information about the interfering electron wave-packets. The present approach provides detailed insight on the strong-field laser-atom interaction mechanism, while establishing the era of phase selective interaction studies. Furthermore, it paves the way for substantial enhancement of the spectral and temporal precision of measurements by in-situ controlling the phase distribution of the emitted radiation and/or spatially selecting the EUV-radiation-atom interaction products.