• GRB 090926A was detected by both the GBM and LAT instruments on-board the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope. Swift follow-up observations began ~13 hours after the initial trigger. The optical afterglow was detected for nearly 23 days post trigger, placing it in the long lived category. The afterglow is of particular interest due to its brightness at late times, as well as the presence of optical flares at T0+10^5 s and later, which may indicate late-time central engine activity. The LAT has detected a total of 16 GRBs; 9 of these bursts, including GRB 090926A, also have been observed by Swift. Of the 9 Swift observed LAT bursts, 6 were detected by UVOT, with 5 of the bursts having bright, long-lived optical afterglows. In comparison, Swift has been operating for 5 years and has detected nearly 500 bursts, but has only seen ~30% of bursts with optical afterglows that live longer than 10^5 s. We have calculated the predicted gamma-ray fluence, as would have been seen by the BAT on-board Swift, of the LAT bursts to determine whether this high percentage of long-lived optical afterglows is unique, when compared to BAT-triggered bursts. We find that, with the exception of the short burst GRB 090510A, the predicted BAT fluences indicate the LAT bursts are more energetic than 88% of all Swift bursts, and also have brighter than average X-ray and optical afterglows.
  • We present a homogeneous X-ray analysis of all 318 Gamma Ray Bursts detected by the X-ray Telescope on the Swift satellite up to 2008 July 23; this represents the largest sample of X-ray GRB data published to date. In Sections 2--3 we detail the methods which the Swift-XRT team has developed to produce the enhanced positions, light curves, hardness ratios and spectra presented in this paper. Software using these methods continues to create such products for all new GRBs observed by the Swift-XRT. We also detail web-based tools allowing users to create these products for any object observed by the XRT, not just GRBs. In Sections 4--6 we present the results of our analysis of GRBs, including probability distribution functions of the temporal and spectral properties of the sample. We demonstrate evidence for a consistent underlying behaviour which can produce a range of light curve morphologies, and attempt to interpret this behaviour in the framework of external forward shock emission. We find several difficulties, in particular that reconciliation of our data with the forward shock model requires energy injection to continue for days to weeks.
  • Long duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) release copious amounts of energy across the entire electromagnetic spectrum, and so provide a window into the process of black hole formation from the collapse of a massive star. Over the last forty years, our understanding of the GRB phenomenon has progressed dramatically; nevertheless, fortuitous circumstances occasionally arise that provide access to a regime not yet probed. GRB 080319B presented such an opportunity, with extraordinarily bright prompt optical emission that peaked at a visual magnitude of 5.3, making it briefly visible with the naked eye. It was captured in exquisite detail by wide-field telescopes, imaging the burst location from before the time of the explosion. The combination of these unique optical data with simultaneous gamma-ray observations provides powerful diagnostics of the detailed physics of this explosion within seconds of its formation. Here we show that the prompt optical and gamma-ray emissions from this event likely arise from different spectral components within the same physical region located at a large distance from the source, implying an extremely relativistic outflow. The chromatic behaviour of the broadband afterglow is consistent with viewing the GRB down the very narrow inner core of a two-component jet that is expanding into a wind-like environment consistent with the massive star origin of long GRBs. These circumstances can explain the extreme properties of this GRB.
  • We present the complete on-line catalogue of gamma-ray bursts observed by the two Wide Field Cameras on board \sax in the period 1996-2002. Our aim is to provide the community with the largest published data set of GRB's prompt emission X-ray light curves and other useful data. This catalogue (BS-GRBWFCcat) contains data on 77 bursts and a collection of the X-ray light curves of 56 GRB discovered or noticed shortly after the event and of other additional bursts detected in subsequent searches. Light curves are given in the three X-ray energy bands (2-5, 5-10, 10-26 keV). The catalogue can be accessed from the home web page of the ASI Science Data Center-ASDC (http://www.asdc.asi.it)
  • We present the results of a detailed spectral and temporal analysis of Swift and XMM-Newton observations of the high redshift (z=3.969) GRB 050730. The X-ray afterglow of GRB 050730 was found to decline with time with superimposed intense flaring activity that extended over more than two orders of magnitude in time. Seven distinct re-brightening events starting from 236 s up to 41.2 ks after the burst were observed. The underlying decay of the afterglow was well described by a double broken power-law model with breaks at t_1= 237 +/- 20 s and t_2 = 10.1 (-2.2) (+4.6) ks. The temporal decay slopes before, between and after these breaks were alpha_1 = 2.1 +/- 0.3, alpha_2 = 0.44 (-0.08) (+0.14) and alpha_3 = 2.40 (+0.07) (-0.09), respectively. The spectrum of the X-ray afterglow was well described by a photoelectrically absorbed power-law with an absorbing column density N_H=(1.28 +/- 0.26) 10^22 cm^-2 in the host galaxy. Strong X-ray spectral evolution during the flaring activity was present. In the majority of the flares (6/7) the ratio Delta_t/t_p between the duration of the event and the time when the flare peaks was nearly constant and about 0.6-0.7. We showed that the observed spectral and temporal properties of the first three flares are consistent with being due both to high-latitude emission, as expected if the flares were produced by late internal shocks, or to refreshed shocks, i.e. late time energy injections into the main afterglow shock by slow moving shells ejected from the central engine during the prompt phase. The event fully satisfies the E_p-E_iso Amati relation while is not consistent with the E_p-E_jet Ghirlanda relation.
  • Based on the analysis of a small sample of BATSE and Konus gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) with know redshift it has been reported that the width of the autocorrelation function (ACF) shows a remarkable bimodal distribution in the rest-frame of the source. However, the origin of these two well-separated ACF classes remains unexplained.We complement previous ACF analysis studying the corresponding power density spectra (PDS). With the addition of Beppo-SAX data and taken advantage of its broad-band capability, we not only increase the burst sample but we extend the analysis to X-ray energies. The rest-frame PDS analysis at gamma-ray energies shows that the two ACF classes are not simply characterised by a different low frequency cut-off, but they have a distinct variability as a whole in the studied frequency range. Both classes exhibit average PDS with power-law behaviour at high frequencies (f' > 0.1 Hz) but significantly different slopes, with index values close to those of Brownian (-2) and Kolmogorov (-5/3) spectra for the narrow and broad classes respectively. The latter spectrum presents an additional PDS component, a low-frequency noise excess with a sharp cut-off. At X-ray energies we find the power-law index unchanged for the broad class, but a significantly steeper slope in the narrow case (~ -3). We interpret this as an indication that the broad class bursts have weaker spectral evolution than the narrow ones, as suggested also by our analysis of the ACF energy dependence. The low and high frequency PDS components may then arise from two radiating regions involving different emission mechanisms.
  • Gamma-ray burst light curves show quite different patterns: from very simple to extremely complex. We present a temporal and spectral study of the light curves in three energy bands (2-5, 5-10, 10-26 keV) of ten GRBs detected by the Wide Field Cameras on board BeppoSAX. For some events the time profiles are characterized by peaks superposed on a slowly evolving pedestal, which in some cases becomes less apparent at higher energies. We describe this behaviour with the presence of two components (slow and fast) having different variability time scales. We modelled the time evolution of slow components by means of an analytical function able to describe asymmetric rising and decaying profiles. The residual light curves, after the subtraction of the slow components, generally show structures more similar to the original curves in the highest energy band. Spectral study of these two components was performed evaluating their hardness ratios, used also to derive photon indices. Slow components are found generally softer than the fast ones suggesting that their origin is likely different. Being typical photon indices lower than those of the afterglows there is no evidence that the emission processes are similar. Another interesting possibility is that slow components can be related to the presence of a hot photosphere having a thermal spectrum with kT around a few keV superposed to a rapid variable non-thermal emission of the fast component.
  • We report on the X-ray observations of the X-ray flash (XRF) which occurred on 2002 April 27, three days before BeppoSAX was switched off. The event was detected with the BeppoSAX Wide Field Cameras but not with the Gamma ray Burst Monitor. A follow-up observation with the BeppoSAX Narrow Field Instruments was soon performed and a candidate afterglow source was discovered. We present the results obtained. We also include the results obtained from the observations of the XRF field with the Chandra X-ray satellite. The spectral analysis of the prompt emission shows that the peak energy of the EF(E) spectrum is lower than 5.5 keV, with negligible spectral evolution. The X-ray afterglow spectrum is consistent with a power law model with photon index of about 2, while the 2-10 keV flux fades as a power law with a decay index -1.33. Both these indices are typical of GRBs. A very marginal excess around 4.5-5 keV is found in the afterglow spectrum measured by BeppoSAX . As for many GRBs, the extrapolation of the 2-10 keV fading law back to the time of the prompt emission is consistent with the X-ray flux measured during the second part of the event. We estimate a possible range of values of the redshift and discuss our results in the light of current models of XRFs.