• We present the first double-lined orbital solution for the close binary in the GW Ori triple system. Using 12 epochs of infrared spectroscopy, we detected the lines of both stars in the inner pair, previously known as single-lined only. Our preliminary infrared orbital solution has an eccentricity of e = 0.21 +/- 0.10, a period of P = 241.15 +/- 0.72 days, and a mass ratio of q = 0.66 +/- 0.13. We find a larger semi-amplitude for the primary star, K1 = 6.57 +/- 1.00 km s^-1, with an infrared-only solution compared to K1 = 4.41 +/- 0.33 km s^-1 with optical data from the literature, likely the result of line blending and veiling in the optical. The component spectral types correspond to G3 and K0 stars, with vsini values of 43 km s^-1 and 50 km s^-1, respectively. We obtained a flux ratio of alpha = 0.58 +/- 0.14 in the H-band, allowing us to estimate individual masses of 3.2 and 2.7 M_sun for the primary and secondary, respectively, using evolutionary tracks. The tracks also yield a coeval age of 1 Myr for both components to within 1 sigma. GW Ori is surrounded by a circumbinary/circumtriple disk. A tertiary component has been detected in previous studies; however, we did not detect this component in our near-infrared spectra, probably the result of its relative faintness and blending in the absorption lines of these rapidly rotating stars. With these results, GW Ori joins the small number of classical T Tauri, double-lined spectroscopic binaries.
  • We outline here the next generation of cluster-finding algorithms. We show how advances in Computer Science and Statistics have helped develop robust, fast algorithms for finding clusters of galaxies in large multi-dimensional astronomical databases like the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Specifically, this paper presents four new advances: (1) A new semi-parametric algorithm - nicknamed ``C4'' - for jointly finding clusters of galaxies in the SDSS and ROSAT All-Sky Survey databases; (2) The introduction of the False Discovery Rate into Astronomy; (3) The role of kernel shape in optimizing cluster detection; (4) A new determination of the X-ray Cluster Luminosity Function which has bearing on the existence of a ``deficit'' of high redshift, high luminosity clusters. This research is part of our ``Computational AstroStatistics'' collaboration (see Nichol et al. 2000) and the algorithms and techniques discussed herein will form part of the ``Virtual Observatory'' analysis toolkit.
  • In this paper, we outline the use of Mixture Models in density estimation of large astronomical databases. This method of density estimation has been known in Statistics for some time but has not been implemented because of the large computational cost. Herein, we detail an implementation of the Mixture Model density estimation based on multi-resolutional KD-trees which makes this statistical technique into a computationally tractable problem. We provide the theoretical and experimental background for using a mixture model of Gaussians based on the Expectation Maximization (EM) Algorithm. Applying these analyses to simulated data sets we show that the EM algorithm - using the AIC penalized likelihood to score the fit - out-performs the best kernel density estimate of the distribution while requiring no ``fine--tuning'' of the input algorithm parameters. We find that EM can accurately recover the underlying density distribution from point processes thus providing an efficient adaptive smoothing method for astronomical source catalogs. To demonstrate the general application of this statistic to astrophysical problems we consider two cases of density estimation: the clustering of galaxies in redshift space and the clustering of stars in color space. From these data we show that EM provides an adaptive smoothing of the distribution of galaxies in redshift space (describing accurately both the small and large-scale features within the data) and a means of identifying outliers in multi-dimensional color-color space (e.g. for the identification of high redshift QSOs). Automated tools such as those based on the EM algorithm will be needed in the analysis of the next generation of astronomical catalogs (2MASS, FIRST, PLANCK, SDSS) and ultimately in in the development of the National Virtual Observatory.
  • We present initial results on the use of Mixture Models for density estimation in large astronomical databases. We provide herein both the theoretical and experimental background for using a mixture model of Gaussians based on the Expectation Maximization (EM) Algorithm. Applying these analyses to simulated data sets we show that the EM algorithm - using the both the AIC & BIC penalized likelihood to score the fit - can out-perform the best kernel density estimate of the distribution while requiring no ``fine-tuning'' of the input algorithm parameters. We find that EM can accurately recover the underlying density distribution from point processes thus providing an efficient adaptive smoothing method for astronomical source catalogs. To demonstrate the general application of this statistic to astrophysical problems we consider two cases of density estimation; the clustering of galaxies in redshift space and the clustering of stars in color space. From these data we show that EM provides an adaptive smoothing of the distribution of galaxies in redshift space (describing accurately both the small and large-scale features within the data) and a means of identifying outliers in multi-dimensional color-color space (e.g. for the identification of high redshift QSOs). Automated tools such as those based on the EM algorithm will be needed in the analysis of the next generation of astronomical catalogs (2MASS, FIRST, PLANCK, SDSS) and ultimately in the development of the National Virtual Observatory.