• We utilized X-ray photoemission electron microscopy (XPEEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to investigate the crystal surface of Weyl semimetal NbAs. XPEEM images present white and black contrast in both the Nb 3d and As 3d core level spectra. Surface-sensitive XPS spectra indicate that the entire surface of the sample contains both surface states of Nb 3d and As 3d, in form of oxides, and bulk states of NbAs. Estimated atomic percentage values nNb/nAs suggest that the surface is Nb-rich and asymmetric for white and black areas.
  • We report the magnetoresistance (MR), Hall effect, and de Haas-van Alphen (dHvA) effect studies of the single crystals of tungsten carbide, WC, which is predicted to be a new type of topological semimetal with triply degenerate nodes. With the magnetic field rotated in the plane perpendicular to the current, WC shows field induced metal to insulator like transition and large nonsaturating quadratic MR at low temperature. As the magnetic field parallel to the current, a pronounced negative longitudinal MR only can be observed when the current flows along the certain direction. Hall effect indicates WC is a perfect compensated semimetal, which may be related to the large nonsaturating quadratic MR. The analysis of dHvA oscillations reveals that WC is a multiband system with small cross-sectional areas of Fermi surface and light cyclotron effective masses. Our results indicate that WC is an ideal platform to study the recently proposed New Fermions with triply degenerate crossing points.
  • The pentatellurides, ZrTe5 and HfTe5 are layered compounds with one dimensional transition-metal chains that show a never understood temperature dependent transition in transport properties as well as recently discovered properties suggesting topological semimetallic behavior. Here we show that these materials are semiconductors and that the electronic transition is due to a combination of bipolar effects and different anisotropies for electrons and holes. We report magneto-transport properties for two kinds of ZrTe5 single crystals grown with the chemical vapor transport (S1) and the flux method (S2), respectively. These have distinct transport properties at zero field: the S1 displays a metallic behavior with a pronounced resistance peak and a sudden sign reversal in thermopower at approximately 130 K, consistent with previous observations of the electronic transition; in strikingly contrast, the S2 exhibits a semiconducting-like behavior at low temperatures and a positive thermopower over the whole temperature range. Refinements on the single-crystal X-ray diffraction and the energy dispersive spectroscopy analysis revealed the presence of noticeable Te-vacancies in the sample S1, confirming that the widely observed anomalous transport behaviors in pentatellurides actually take place in the Te-deficient samples. Electronic structure calculations show narrow gap semiconducting behavior, with different transport anisotropies for holes and electrons. For the degenerately doped n-type samples, our transport calculations can result in a resistivity peak and crossover in thermopower from negative to positive at temperatures close to that observed experimentally. Our present work resolves the longstanding puzzle regarding the anomalous transport behaviors of pentatellurides, and also resolves the electronic structure in favor of a semiconducting state.
  • Strong coupling between discrete phonon and continuous electron-hole pair excitations can give rise to a pronounced asymmetry in the phonon line shape, known as the Fano resonance. This effect has been observed in a variety of systems, such as stripe-phase nickelates, graphene and high-$T_{c}$ superconductors. Here, we reveal explicit evidence for strong coupling between an infrared-active $A_1$ phonon and electronic transitions near the Weyl points (Weyl fermions) through the observation of a Fano resonance in the recently discovered Weyl semimetal TaAs. The resultant asymmetry in the phonon line shape, conspicuous at low temperatures, diminishes continuously as the temperature increases. This anomalous behavior originates from the suppression of the electronic transitions near the Weyl points due to the decreasing occupation of electronic states below the Fermi level ($E_{F}$) with increasing temperature, as well as Pauli blocking caused by thermally excited electrons above $E_{F}$. Our findings not only elucidate the underlying mechanism governing the tunable Fano resonance, but also open a new route for exploring exotic physical phenomena through the properties of phonons in Weyl semimetals.
  • We have investigated the magnetoresistance (MR) and Hall resistivity properties of the single crystals of tantalum sulfide, Ta3S2, which was recently predicted to be a new type II Weyl semimetal. Large MR (up to ~8000% at 2 K and 16 T), field-induced metal-insulator-like transition and nonlinear Hall resistivity are observed at low temperatures. The large MR shows a strong dependence on the field orientation, leading to a giant anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) effect. For the field applied along the b-axis (B//b), MR exhibits quadratic field dependence at low fields and tends towards saturation at high fields; while for B//a, MR presents quadratic field dependence at low fields and becomes linear at high fields without any trend towards saturation. The analysis of the Hall resistivity data indicates the coexistence of a large number of electrons with low mobility and a small number of holes with high mobility. Shubnikov-de Haas (SdH) oscillation analysis reveals three fundamental frequencies originated from the three-dimensional (3D) Fermi surface (FS) pockets. We find that the semi-classical multiband model is sufficient to account for the experimentally observed MR in Ta3S2.
  • We report a comparative polarized Raman study of Weyl semimetals TaAs, NbAs, TaP and NbP. The evolution of the phonon frequencies with the sample composition allows us to determine experimentally which atoms are mainly involved for each vibration mode. Our results confirm previous first-principles calculations indicating that the A$_1$, B$_1(2)$, E$(2)$ and E$(3)$ modes involve mainly the As(P) atoms, the B$_1(1)$ mode is mainly related to Ta(Nb) atoms, and the E$(1)$ mode involves both kinds of atoms. By comparing the energy of the different modes, we establish that the B$_1(1)$, B$_1(2)$, E$(2)$ and E$(3)$ become harder with chemical pressure increasing. This behavior differs from our observation on the A$_1$ mode, which decreases in energy, in contrast to its behavior under external pressure.
  • Recently, ZrTe5 and HfTe5 are theoretically studied to be the most promising layered topological insulators since they are both interlayer weakly bonded materials and also with a large bulk gap in the single layer. It paves a new way for the study of novel topological quantum phenomenon tuned via external parameters. Here, we report the discovery of superconductivity and properties evolution in HfTe5 single crystal induced via pressures. Our experiments indicated that anomaly resistance peak moves to low temperature first before reverses to high temperature followed by disappearance which is opposite to the low pressure effect on ZrTe5. HfTe5 became superconductive above ~5.5 GPa up to at least 35 GPa in the measured range. The highest superconducting transition temperature (Tc) around 5 K was achieved at 20 GPa. High pressure Raman revealed that new modes appeared around pressure where superconductivity occurs. Crystal structure studies shown that the superconductivity is related to the phase transition from Cmcm structure to monoclinic C2/m structure. The second phase transition from C2/m to P-1 structure occurs at 12 GPa. The combination of transport, structure measurement and theoretical calculations enable a completely phase diagram of HfTe5 at high pressures.
  • There is a long-standing confusion concerning the physical origin of the anomalous resistivity peak in transition metal pentatelluride HfTe5. Several mechanisms, like the formation of charge density wave or polaron, have been proposed, but so far no conclusive evidence has been presented. In this work, we investigate the unusual temperature dependence of magneto-transport properties in HfTe5. We find that a three dimensional topological Dirac semimetal state emerges only at around Tp (at which the resistivity shows a pronounced peak), as manifested by a large negative magnetoresistance. This accidental Dirac semimetal state mediates the topological quantum phase transition between the two distinct weak and strong topological insulator phases in HfTe5. Our work not only provides the first evidence of a temperature-induced critical topological phase transition in HfTe5, but also gives a reasonable explanation on the long-lasting question.
  • We report an investigation of the superconducting order parameter of the noncentrosymmetric compound PbTaSe$_2$, which is believed to have a topologically nontrivial band structure. Precise measurements of the London penetration depth $\Delta\lambda(T)$ obtained using a tunnel diode oscillator (TDO) based method show an exponential temperature dependence at $T\ll T_c$, suggesting a nodeless superconducting gap structure. A single band s-wave model well describes the corresponding normalized superfluid density, with a gap magnitude of $\Delta(0)=1.85T_c$. This is very close to the value of $1.76T_c$ for weak-coupling BCS superconductors, indicating conventional fully-gapped superconductivity in PbTaSe$_2$.
  • We have investigated the spin texture of surface Fermi arcs in the recently discovered Weyl semimetal TaAs using spin- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. The experimental results demonstrate that the Fermi arcs are spin-polarized. The measured spin texture fulfills the requirement of mirror and time reversal symmetries and is well reproduced by our first-principles calculations, which gives strong evidence for the topologically nontrivial Weyl semimetal state in TaAs. The consistency between the experimental and calculated results further confirms the distribution of chirality of the Weyl nodes determined by first-principles calculations.
  • We present a systematic study of both the temperature and frequency dependence of the optical response in TaAs, a material that has recently been realized to host the Weyl semimetal state. Our study reveals that the optical conductivity of TaAs features a narrow Drude response alongside a conspicuous linear dependence on frequency. The width of the Drude peak decreases upon cooling, following a $T^{2}$ temperature dependence which is expected for Weyl semimetals. Two linear components with distinct slopes dominate the 5-K optical conductivity. A comparison between our experimental results and theoretical calculations suggests that the linear conductivity below $\sim$230~cm$^{-1}$ is a clear signature of the Weyl points lying in very close proximity to the Fermi energy.
  • In 1929, H. Weyl proposed that the massless solution of Dirac equation represents a pair of new type particles, the so-called Weyl fermions [1]. However the existence of them in particle physics remains elusive for more than eight decades. Recently, significant advances in both topological insulators and topological semimetals have provided an alternative way to realize Weyl fermions in condensed matter as an emergent phenomenon: when two non-degenerate bands in the three-dimensional momentum space cross in the vicinity of Fermi energy (called as Weyl nodes), the low energy excitation behaves exactly the same as Weyl fermions. Here, by performing soft x-ray angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy measurements which mainly probe bulk band structure, we directly observe the long-sought-after Weyl nodes for the first time in TaAs, whose projected locations on the (001) surface match well to the Fermi arcs, providing undisputable experimental evidence of existence of Weyl fermion quasiparticles in TaAs.
  • Weyl semimetals are a class of materials that can be regarded as three-dimensional analogs of graphene breaking time reversal or inversion symmetry. Electrons in a Weyl semimetal behave as Weyl fermions, which have many exotic properties, such as chiral anomaly and magnetic monopoles in the crystal momentum space. The surface state of a Weyl semimetal displays pairs of entangled Fermi arcs at two opposite surfaces. However, the existence of Weyl semimetals has not yet been proved experimentally. Here we report the experimental realization of a Weyl semimetal in TaAs by observing Fermi arcs formed by its surface states using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. Our first-principles calculations, matching remarkably well with the experimental results, further confirm that TaAs is a Weyl semimetal.
  • We report a polarized Raman study of Weyl semimetal TaAs. We observe all the optical phonons, with energies and symmetries consistent with our first-principles calculations. We detect additional excitations assigned to multiple-phonon excitations. These excitations are accompanied by broad peaks separated by 140~cm$^{-1}$ that are also most likely associated with multiple-phonon excitations. We also noticed a sizable B$_1$ component for the spectral background, for which the origin remains unclear.
  • The interplay between magnetism and superconductivity is one of the dominant themes in the study of unconventional superconductors, such as high-Tc cuprates, iron pnictides and heavy fermions. In such systems, the same d- or f-electrons tend to form magnetically ordered states and participate in building up a high density of states at the Fermi level, which is responsible for the superconductivity. Charge-density-wave (CDW) is another fascinating collective quantum phenomenon in some low dimensional materials, like the prototypical transition-metal poly-chalcogenides, in which CDW instability is frequently found to accompany with superconducting transition at low temperatures. Remarkably, similar to the antiferromagnetic superconductors, superconductivity can also be achieved upon suppression of CDW order via chemical doping or applied pressure in 1T-TiSe2. However, in these CDW superconductors, the two ground states are believed to occur in different parts of Fermi surface (FS) sheets, derived mainly from chalcogen p-states and transition metal d-states, respectively. The origin of superconductivity and its interplay with CDW instability has not yet been unambiguously determined. Here we report on the discovery of bulk superconductivity in Pd-intercalated CDW RETen (RE=rare earth; n=2.5, 3) compounds, which belong to a large family of rare-earth poly-chalcogenides with CDW instability usually developing in the planar square nets of tellurium at remarkably high transition temperature and the electronic properties are also dominated by chalcogen p-orbitals. Our study demonstrates that the intercalation of palladium leads to the suppression of the CDW order and the emergence of the superconductivity. Our finding could provide an ideal model system for comprehensive studies of the interplay between CDW and superconductivity.
  • We report the results of a detailed study of the structural, magnetic and magnetotransport properties of as-grown and annealed Ga0.91Mn0.09As thin films grown on (311)A and (311)B GaAs substrates. The high Curie temperature and hole density of the (311)B material are comparable to those of GaMnAs grown on (001) GaAs under the same growth conditions, while they are much lower for the (311)A material. We find evidence that Mn incorporation is more efficient for (311)B than for (001) and significantly less efficient for (311)A which is consistent with the bonding on these surfaces. This indicates that growth on (311)B may be a route to increased Curie temperatures in GaMnAs. A biaxial magnetic anisotropy is observed for the (311) material with easy axes along the [010] and [001] out-of-plane directions. An additional uniaxial in-plane anisotropy is also observed with the easy axis along for the (311)A material, and along for the (311)B material. This new observation may be of importance for the resolution of the outstanding problem of the origin of uniaxial anisotropy in (001) GaMnAs.
  • We have performed a systematic investigation of magnetotransport of a series of as-grown and annealed Ga1-xMnxAs samples with 0.011 <= x <= 0.09. We find that the anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) generally decreases with increasing magnetic anisotropy, with increasing Mn concentration and on low temperature annealing. We show that the uniaxial magnetic anisotropy can be clearly observed from AMR for the samples with x >= 0.02. This becomes the dominant anisotropy at elevated temperatures, and is shown to rotate by 90o on annealing. We find that the in-plane longitudinal resistivity depends not only on the relative angle between magnetization and current direction, but also on the relative angle between magnetization and the main crystalline axes. The latter term becomes much smaller after low temperature annealing. The planar Hall effect is in good agreement with the measured AMR indicating the sample is approximately in a single domain state throughout most of the magnetisation reversal, with a two-step magnetisation jump ascribed to domain wall nucleation and propagation.
  • A novel sol-gel route to c-axis orientated undoped and Co, Fe, Mn and V doped ZnO films is reported. Sols were prepared from a hydrated zinc acetate precursor and dimethyl formamide (DMF) solvent. Films were spin-coated on to hydrophilic sapphire substrates then dried, annealed and post-annealed, producing almost purely uniaxial ZnO crystallites and a high degree of long-range structural order. Specific orientation of hexagonal crystallites is demonstrated both perpendicular and parallel to the substrate surface. Cobalt doping resulted in the formation of columnar ZnO nanocrystals. Vanadium doped films formed the spinel oxide ZnAl2O4, resulting from the reaction between ZnO and the sapphire substrate. Structural, optical and morphological characterisation demonstrated the high quality of the films.