• Fragmentation cross section of $^{28}$Si + $^{9}$Be reaction at 75.8 MeV/u was analyzed for studying the decay mode of single-proton emission in $^{21}$Al (the proton-rich nucleus with neutron closed-shell of $N = 8$ and $T_z = -5/2$). With the comparison between the measured fragmentation cross section and the theoretical cross section produced by EPAX3.1a for the observed nuclei (i.e. $^{20}$Mg, $^{21}$Al and $^{22}$Si), the expected yield for a particle stable $^{21}$Al was estimated. With the exponential decay law, an upper limit of half-life of $13$ ns was determined. Using the single-proton penetration model, the upper limit of single-proton separation energy of $-105$ keV was deduced. This deduced mass limit agrees with the microscopic calculation based on nucleon-nucleon (NN) + three-nucleon (3N) forces in $sdf_{7/2}p_{3/2}$ valence space, which indicates the importance of 3N forces in $^{21}$Al.
  • A cluster-transfer experiment $^9$Be($^9$Be,$^{14}$C$^*\rightarrow\alpha$+$^{10}$Be)$\alpha$ was carried out using an incident beam energy of 45 MeV. This reaction channel has a large $Q$-value that favors populating the high-lying states in $^{14}$C and separating various reaction channels. A number of resonant states are reconstructed from the forward emitting $^{10}$Be + $\alpha$ fragments with respect to three sets of well discriminated final states in $^{10}$Be, most of which agree with the previous observations. A state at 22.5(1) MeV in $^{14}$C is found to decay predominantly into the states around 6 MeV in $^{10}$Be daughter nucleus, in line with the unique property of the predicted band head of the $\sigma$-bond linear-chain molecular states. A new state at 23.5(1) MeV is identified which decays strongly into the first excited state of $^{10}$Be.
  • A cluster-transfer experiment of $^9\rm{Be}(^9\rm{Be},^{14}\rm{C}\rightarrow\alpha+^{10}\rm{Be})\alpha$ at an incident energy of 45 MeV was carried out in order to investigate the molecular structure in high-lying resonant states in $^{14}$C. This reaction is of extremely large $Q$-value, making it an excellent case to select the reaction mechanism and the final states in outgoing nuclei. The high-lying resonances in $^{14}$C are reconstructed for three sets of well discriminated final states in $^{10}$Be. The results confirm the previous decay measurements with clearly improved decay-channel selections and show also a new state at 23.5(1) MeV. The resonant states at 22.4(3) and 24.0(3) MeV decay primarily into the typical molecular states at about 6 MeV in $^{10}$Be, indicating a well developed cluster structure in these high-lying states in $^{14}$C. Further measurements of more states of this kind are suggested.
  • The fusion dynamic mechanism of heavy-ions at energies near the Coulomb barrier is complicated and still not very clear up to now. Accordingly, a self-consistent method based on the CCFULL calculations has been developed and applied for an ingoing study of the effect of the positive Q-value neutron transfer (PQNT) channels in this work. The typical experimental fusion data of Ca + Ca and Ni + Ni is analyzed within the unified calculation scheme. The PQNT effect in near-barrier fusion is further confirmed based on the self-consistent analysis and extracted quantitatively.
  • Y-Ba-Cu-O (YBCO) and Sm-Ba-Cu-O (SmBCO) thin films have been used for the first time as heterogeneous seeds to multi-seed successfully the melt growth of bulk YBCO in a multi-seeded melt growth (MSMG) process. The use of thin film seeds, which may be prepared with highly controlled orientation (i.e. with a well-defined a-b plane and precisely known a-direction), is based on their superheating properties and reduces significantly contamination of the bulk sample by the seed material. A variety of grain boundaries were obtained by varying the angle between the seeds. Microstructural studies indicate that the extent of residual melt deposited at the grain boundary decreases with increasing grain boundary contact angle. It is established that the growth front proceeds continuously at the (110)/(110) grain boundary without trapping liquid, which leads to the formation of a clean grain boundary.