• The inductive size bias coupling technique and Stein's method yield a Berry-Esseen theorem for the number of urns having occupancy $d \ge 2$ when $n$ balls are uniformly distributed over $m$ urns. In particular, there exists a constant $C$ depending only on $d$ such that $$ \sup_{z \in \mathbb{R}}|P(W_{n,m} \le z) -P(Z \le z)| \le C \left( \frac{1+(\frac{n}{m})^3}{\sigma_{n,m}} \right) \quad \mbox{for all $n \ge d$ and $m \ge 2$,} $$ where $W_{n,m}$ and $\sigma_{n,m}^2$ are the standardized count and variance, respectively, of the number of urns with $d$ balls, and $Z$ is a standard normal random variable. Asymptotically, the bound is optimal up to constants if $n$ and $m$ tend to infinity together in a way such that $n/m$ stays bounded.
  • The generalized Dickman distribution ${\cal D}_\theta$ with parameter $\theta>0$ is the unique solution to the distributional equality $W=_d W^*$, where \begin{eqnarray} W^*=_d U^{1/\theta}(W+1) \qquad (1) \end{eqnarray} with $W$ non-negative with probability one, $U \sim {\cal U}[0,1]$ independent of $W$, and $=_d$ denoting equality in distribution. Members of this family appear in number theory, stochastic geometry, perpetuities and the study of algorithms. We obtain bounds in Wasserstein type distances between ${\cal D}_\theta$ and \begin{eqnarray} W_n= \frac{1}{n} \sum_{i=1}^n Y_k B_k \qquad (2) \end{eqnarray} where $B_1,\ldots,B_n, Y_1, \ldots, Y_n$ are independent with $B_k \sim {\rm Ber}(1/k), E[Y_k]=k, {\rm Var}(Y_k)=\sigma_k^2$ and provide an application to the minimal directed spanning tree in $\mathbb{R}^2$, and also obtain such bounds when the Bernoulli variables in $(2)$ are replaced by Poissons. We also give simple proofs and provide bounds with optimal rates for the Dickman convergence of the weighted sums, arising in probabilistic number theory, of the form \begin{eqnarray} S_n=\frac{1}{\log(p_n)} \sum_{k=1}^n X_k \log(p_k) \end{eqnarray} where $(p_k)_{k \ge 1}$ is an enumeration of the prime numbers in increasing order and $X_k$ is Geometric with parameter $(1-1/p_k)$, Bernoulli with success probability $1/(1+p_k)$ or Poisson with mean $\lambda_k$. In addition, we broaden the class of generalized Dickman distributions by studying the fixed points of the transformation \begin{eqnarray*} s(W^*)=_d U^{1/\theta}s(W+1) \end{eqnarray*} generalizing $(1)$, that allows the use of non-identity utility functions $s(\cdot)$ in Vervaat perpetuities. We obtain distributional bounds for recursive methods that can be used to simulate from this family.
  • Given a non-negative random variable $W$ and $\theta>0$, let the generalized Dickman transformation map the distribution of $W$ to that of $$ W^*=_d U^{1/\theta}(W+1), $$ where $U \sim {\cal U}[0,1]$, a uniformly distributed variable on the unit interval, independent of $W$, and where $=_d$ denotes equality in distribution. It is well known that $W^*$ and $W$ are equal in distribution if and only if $W$ has the generalized Dickman distribution ${\cal D}_\theta$. We demonstrate that the Wasserstein distance $d_1$ between $W$, a non-negative random variable with finite mean, and $D_\theta$ having distribution ${\cal D}_\theta$ obeys the inequality $$ d_1(W,D_\theta) \le (1+\theta)d_1(W,W^*). $$ The specialization of this bound to the case $\theta=1$ and coupling constructions yield $$ d_1(W_{n,1},D) \le \frac{8\log (n/2)+10}{n} \quad \mbox{for all $n \ge 1$, where} \quad W_{n,1}=\frac{1}{n}C_{n,1}-1, $$ and $C_{n,m}$ is the number of comparisons made by the Quickselect algorithm to find the $m^{th}$ smallest element of a list of $n$ distinct numbers. A similar bound holds for $m \ge 2$, and together recover the results of [12] that show distributional convergence of $W_n$ to the standard Dickman distribution in the asymptotic regime $m=o(n)$. By developing an exact expression for the expected running time $E[C_{n,m}]$, lower bounds are provided that show the rate is not improvable for all $m \not = 2$.
  • Size bias occurs famously in waiting-time paradoxes, undesirably in sampling schemes, and unexpectedly in connection with Stein's method, tightness, analysis of the lognormal distribution, Skorohod embedding, infinite divisibility, and number theory. In this paper we review the basics and survey some of these unexpected connections.
  • Given events $A$ and $B$ on a product space $S=\prod_{i=1}^n S_i$, the set $A \Box B$ consists of all vectors ${\bf x}=(x_1,\ldots,x_n) \in S$ for which there exist disjoint coordinate subsets $K$ and $L$ of $\{1,\ldots,n\}$ such that given the coordinates $x_i, i \in K$ one has that ${\bf x} \in A$ regardless of the values of ${\bf x}$ on the remaining coordinates, and likewise that ${\bf x} \in B$ given the coordinates {$x_j, j \in L$}. For a finite product of discrete spaces endowed with a product measure, the BKR inequality $$ P(A \Box B) \le P(A)P(B) \quad (1) $$ was conjectured by van den Berg and Kesten [3] and proved by Reimer [13]. In [7] inequality (1) was extended to general product probability spaces, replacing $A \Box B$ by the set $A \Box_{11} B$ consisting of those outcomes ${\bf x}$ which only assure with probability one that ${\bf x} \in A$ and ${\bf x} \in B$ based only on the revealed coordinates in $K$ and $L$ as above. A strengthening of the original BKR inequality (1) results, due to the fact that $A \Box B \subseteq A \Box_{11} B$. In particular, it may be the case that $A \Box B$ is empty, while $A \Box_{11} B$ is not. We propose the further extension $A \Box_{st} B$ depending on probability thresholds $s$ and $t$, where $A \Box_{11} B$ is the special case where both $s$ and $t$ take the value one. The outcomes ${\bf x}$ in $A \Box_{st} B$ are those for which disjoint sets of coordinates $K$ and $L$ exist such that given the values of $\bf x$ on the revealed set of coordinates $K$, the probability that $A$ occurs is at least $s$, and given the coordinates of $\bf x$ in $L$, the probability of $B$ is at least $t$. We provide simple examples that illustrate the utility of these extensions.
  • Performance guarantees for compression in nonlinear models under non-Gaussian observations can be achieved through the use of distributional characteristics that are sensitive to the distance to normality, and which in particular return the value of zero under Gaussian or linear sensing. The use of these characteristics, or discrepancies, improves some previous results in this area by relaxing conditions and tightening performance bounds. In addition, these characteristics are tractable to compute when Gaussian sensing is corrupted by either additive errors or mixing.
  • We provide non-asymptotic $L^1$ bounds to the normal for four well-known models in statistical physics and particle systems in $\mathbb{Z}^d$; the ferromagnetic nearest-neighbor Ising model, the supercritical bond percolation model, the voter model and the contact process. In the Ising model, we obtain an $L^1$ distance bound between the total magnetization and the normal distribution at any temperature when the magnetic moment parameter is nonzero, and when the inverse temperature is below critical and the magnetic moment parameter is zero. In the percolation model we obtain such a bound for the total number of points in a finite region belonging to an infinite cluster in dimensions $d \ge 2$, in the voter model for the occupation time of the origin in dimensions $d \ge 7$, and for finite time integrals of non-constant increasing cylindrical functions evaluated on the one dimensional supercritical contact process started in its unique invariant distribution. The tool developed for these purposes is a version of Stein's method adapted to positively associated random variables. In one dimension, letting $\boldsymbol{\xi}=(\xi_1,\ldots,\xi_m)$ be a positively associated mean zero random vector with components that obey the bound $|\xi_i| \le B, i=1,\ldots,m$, and whose sum $W = \sum_{i=1}^m \xi_i$ has variance 1, it holds that $$ d_1 \left(\mathcal{L}(W),\mathcal{L}(Z) \right) \leq 5B + \sqrt{\frac{8}{\pi}}\sum_{i \neq j} \mathbb{E}[\xi_i \xi_j] $$ where $Z$ has the standard normal distribution and $d_1(\cdot,\cdot)$ is the $L^1$ metric. Our methods apply in the multidimensional case with the $L^1$ metric replaced by a smooth function metric.
  • Threshold-type counts based on multivariate occupancy models with log concave marginals admit bounded size biased couplings under weak conditions, leading to new concentration of measure results for random graphs, germ-grain models in stochastic geometry, multinomial allocation models and multivariate hypergeometric sampling. The work generalizes and improves upon previous results in a number of directions.
  • In a proximity region graph ${\cal G}$ in $\mathbb{R}^d$, two distinct points $x,y$ of a point process $\mu$ are connected when the 'forbidden region' $S(x,y)$ these points determine has empty intersection with $\mu$. The Gabriel graph, where $S(x,y)$ is the open disc with diameter the line segment connecting $x$ and $y$, is one canonical example. When $\mu$ is a Poisson or binomial process, under broad conditions on the regions $S(x,y)$, bounds on the Kolmogorov and Wasserstein distances to the normal are produced for functionals of ${\cal G}$, including the total number of edges and the total length. Variance lower bounds, not requiring strong stabilization, are also proven to hold for a class of such functionals.
  • Let $\lambda$ be the second largest eigenvalue in absolute value of a uniform random $d$-regular graph on $n$ vertices. It was famously conjectured by Alon and proved by Friedman that if $d$ is fixed independent of $n$, then $\lambda=2\sqrt{d-1} +o(1)$ with high probability. In the present work we show that $\lambda=O(\sqrt{d})$ continues to hold with high probability as long as $d=O(n^{2/3})$, making progress towards a conjecture of Vu that the bound holds for all $1\le d\le n/2$. Prior to this work the best result was obtained by Broder, Frieze, Suen and Upfal (1999) using the configuration model, which hits a barrier at $d=o(n^{1/2})$. We are able to go beyond this barrier by proving concentration of measure results directly for the uniform distribution on $d$-regular graphs. These come as consequences of advances we make in the theory of concentration by size biased couplings. Specifically, we obtain Bennett-type tail estimates for random variables admitting certain unbounded size biased couplings.
  • Strong embeddings, that is, couplings between a partial sum process of a sequence of random variables and a Brownian motion, have found numerous applications in probability and statistics. We extend Chatterjee's novel use of Stein's method for $\{-1,+1\}$ valued variables to a general class of discrete distributions, and provide $\log n$ rates for the coupling of partial sums of independent variables to a Brownian motion, and results for coupling sums of suitably standardized exchangeable variables to a Brownian bridge.
  • We study high-dimensional signal recovery from non-linear measurements with design vectors having elliptically symmetric distribution. Special attention is devoted to the situation when the unknown signal belongs to a set of low statistical complexity, while both the measurements and the design vectors are heavy-tailed. We propose and analyze a new estimator that adapts to the structure of the problem, while being robust both to the possible model misspecification characterized by arbitrary non-linearity of the measurements as well as to data corruption modeled by the heavy-tailed distributions. Moreover, this estimator has low computational complexity. Our results are expressed in the form of exponential concentration inequalities for the error of the proposed estimator. On the technical side, our proofs rely on the generic chaining methods, and illustrate the power of this approach for statistical applications. Theory is supported by numerical experiments demonstrating that our estimator outperforms existing alternatives when data is heavy-tailed.
  • The BKR inequality conjectured by van den Berg and Kesten in [11], and proved by Reimer in [8], states that for $A$ and $B$ events on $S$, a finite product of finite sets $S_i,i=1,\ldots,n$, and $P$ any product measure on $S$, $$ P(A \Box B) \le P(A)P(B),$$ where the set $A \Box B$ consists of the elementary events which lie in both $A$ and $B$ for `disjoint reasons.' Precisely, with ${\bf n}:=\{1,\ldots,n\}$ and $K \subset {\bf n}$, for ${\bf x} \in S$ letting $[{\bf x}]_K=\{{\bf y} \in S: y_i = x_i, i \in K\}$, the set $A \Box B$ consists of all ${\bf x} \in S$ for which there exist disjoint subsets $K$ and $L$ of ${\bf n}$ for which $[{\bf x}]_K \subset A$ and $[{\bf x}]_L \subset B$. The BKR inequality is extended to the following functional version on a general finite product measure space $(S,\mathbb{S})$ with product probability measure $P$, $$E\left\{ \max_{\stackrel{K \cap L = \emptyset}{K \subset {\bf n}, L \subset {\bf n}}} \underline{f}_K({\bf X})\underline{g}_L({\bf X})\right\} \leq E\left\{f({\bf X})\right\}\,E\left\{g({\bf X})\right\},$$ where $f$ and $g$ are non-negative measurable functions, $\underline{f}_K({\bf x}) = {\rm ess} \inf_{{\bf y} \in [{\bf x}]_K}f({\bf y})$ and $\underline{g}_L({\bf x}) = {\rm ess} \inf_{{\bf y} \in [{\bf x}]_L}g({\bf y}).$ The original BKR inequality is recovered by taking $f({\bf x})={\bf 1}_A({\bf x})$ and $g({\bf x})={\bf 1}_B({\bf x})$, and applying the fact that in general ${\bf 1}_{A \Box B} \le \max_{K \cap L = \emptyset} \underline{f}_K({\bf x}) \underline{g}_L({\bf x})$. Related formulations, and functional versions of the dual inequality on events by Kahn, Saks, and Smyth [6], are also considered. Applications include order statistics, assignment problems, and paths in random graphs.
  • With ${\mathcal{Q}}_{q,n}$ the distribution of $n$ minus the rank of a matrix chosen uniformly from the collection of all $n\times(n+m)$ matrices over the finite field $\mathbb{F}_q$ of size $q\ge2$, and ${\mathcal{Q}}_q$ the distributional limit of ${\mathcal{Q}}_{q,n}$ as $n\rightarrow\infty$, we apply Stein's method to prove the total variation bound $\frac{1}{8q^{n+m+1}}\leq\|{\mathcal{Q}}_{q,n}-{\mathcal{Q}}_q\|_{\mathrm{TV}}\leq\frac{3}{q^{n+m+1}}$. In addition, we obtain similar sharp results for the rank distributions of symmetric, symmetric with zero diagonal, skew symmetric, skew centrosymmetric and Hermitian matrices.
  • Intrinsic volumes of convex sets are natural geometric quantities that also play important roles in applications, such as linear inverse problems with convex constraints, and constrained statistical inference. It is a well-known fact that, given a closed convex cone $C\subset \mathbb{R}^d$, its conic intrinsic volumes determine a probability measure on the finite set $\{0,1,...d\}$, customarily denoted by $\mathcal{L}(V_C)$. The aim of the present paper is to provide a Berry-Esseen bound for the normal approximation of ${\cal L}(V_C)$, implying a general quantitative central limit theorem (CLT) for sequences of (correctly normalised) discrete probability measures of the type $\mathcal{L}(V_{C_n})$, $n\geq 1$. This bound shows that, in the high-dimensional limit, most conic intrinsic volumes encountered in applications can be approximated by a suitable Gaussian distribution. Our approach is based on a variety of techniques, namely: (1) Steiner formulae for closed convex cones, (2) Stein's method and second order Poincar\'e inequality, (3) concentration estimates, and (4) Fourier analysis. Our results explicitly connect the sharp phase transitions, observed in many regularised linear inverse problems with convex constraints, with the asymptotic Gaussian fluctuations of the intrinsic volumes of the associated descent cones. In particular, our findings complete and further illuminate the recent breakthrough discoveries by Amelunxen, Lotz, McCoy and Tropp (2014) and McCoy and Tropp (2014) about the concentration of conic intrinsic volumes and its connection with threshold phenomena. As an additional outgrowth of our work we develop total variation bounds for normal approximations of the lengths of projections of Gaussian vectors on closed convex sets.
  • Consider a uniformly chosen random reduced decomposition of the longest element in the symmetric group. It is known that the location of the first transposition in this decomposition converges to the semicircle distribution. In this note we provide a sharp error term for this result, using the "comparison of generators" approach to Stein's method.
  • The tails of the distribution of a mean zero, variance $\sigma^2$ random variable $Y$ satisfy concentration of measure inequalities of the form $\mathbb{P}(Y \ge t) \le \exp(-B(t))$ for $$ B(t)=\frac{t^2}{2( \sigma^2 + ct)} \quad \mbox{for $t \ge 0$, and} \quad B(t)=\frac{t}{c}\left( \log t - \log \log t - \frac{\sigma^2}{c}\right) \quad \mbox{for $t>e$} $$ whenever there exists a zero biased coupling of $Y$ bounded by $c$, under suitable conditions on the existence of the moment generating function of $Y$. These inequalities apply in cases where $Y$ is not a function of independent variables, such as for the Hoeffding statistic $Y=\sum_{i=1}^n a_{i\pi(i)}$ where $A=(a_{ij})_{1 \le i,j \le n} \in \mathbb{R}^{n \times n}$ and the permutation $\pi$ has the uniform distribution over the symmetric group, and when its distribution is constant on cycle type.
  • Applying Stein's method, an inductive technique and size bias coupling yields a Berry-Esseen theorem for normal approximation without the usual restriction that the coupling be bounded. The theorem is applied to counting the number of vertices in the Erdos-Renyi random graph of a given degree.
  • Using a characterizing equation for the Beta distribution, Stein's method is applied to obtain bounds of the optimal order for the Wasserstein distance between the distribution of the scaled number of white balls drawn from a P\'olya-Eggenberger urn and its limiting Beta distribution. The bound is computed by making a direct comparison between characterizing operators of the target and the Beta distribution, the former derived by extending Stein's density approach to discrete distributions. In addition, refinements are given to D\"obler's result [12] for the Arcsine approximation for the fraction of time a simple random walk of even length spends positive, and so also to the distributions of its last return time to zero and its first visit to its terminal point, by supplying explicit constants to the present Wasserstein bound and also demonstrating that its rate is of the optimal order.
  • In the so called lightbulb process, on days r=1,..,n, out of n lightbulbs, all initially off, exactly r bulbs selected uniformly and independent of the past have their status changed from off to on, or vice versa. With W_n the number of bulbs on at the terminal time n and C_n a suitable clubbed binomial distribution, d_{TV}(W_n,C_n) \le 2.7314 \sqrt{n} e^{-(n+1)/3} for all n \ge 1. The result is shown using Stein's method.
  • Let $Y$ be a nonnegative random variable with mean $\mu$ and finite positive variance $\sigma^2$, and let $Y^s$, defined on the same space as $Y$, have the $Y$ size biased distribution, that is, the distribution characterized by E[Yf(Y)]=\mu E f(Y^s) for all functions $f$ for which these expectations exist. Under a variety of conditions on the coupling of Y and $Y^s$, including combinations of boundedness and monotonicity, concentration of measure inequalities hold. Examples include the number of relatively ordered subsequences of a random permutation, sliding window statistics including the number of m-runs in a sequence of coin tosses, the number of local maximum of a random function on a lattice, the number of urns containing exactly one ball in an urn allocation model, the volume covered by the union of $n$ balls placed uniformly over a volume n subset of d dimensional Euclidean space, the number of bulbs switched on at the terminal time in the so called lightbulb process, and the infinitely divisible and compound Poisson distributions that satisfy a bounded moment generating function condition.
  • A concentration of measure result is proved for the number of isolated vertices $Y$ in the Erd\H{o}s-R\'{e}nyi random graph model on $n$ edges with edge probability $p$. When $\mu$ and $\sigma^2$ denote the mean and variance of $Y$ respectively, $P((Y-\mu)/\sigma\ge t)$ admits a bound of the form $e^{-kt^2}$ for some constant positive $k$ under the assumption $p \in (0,1)$ and $np\rightarrow c \in (0,\infty)$ as $n \rightarrow \infty$. The left tail inequality $$ P(\frac{Y-\mu}{\sigma}\le -t)&\le& \exp(-\frac{t^2\sigma^2}{4\mu}) $$ holds for all $n \in {2,3,...},p \in (0,1)$ and $t \ge 0$. The results are shown by coupling $Y$ to a random variable $Y^s$ having the $Y$-size biased distribution, that is, the distribution characterized by $E[Yf(Y)]=\mu E[f(Y^s)] $ for all functions $f$ for which these expectations exist.
  • The tools of zero biasing are adapted to yield a general result suitable for analyzing the behavior of certain growth processes. The main theorem is applied to prove central limit theorems, with explicit error terms in the L^1 metric, for certain statistics of the Jack measure on partitions and for the number of balls drawn in a Polya-Eggenberger urn process.
  • We compare estimators of the (essential) supremum and the integral of a function $f$ defined on a measurable space when $f$ may be observed at a sample of points in its domain, possibly with error. The estimators compared vary in their levels of stratification of the domain, with the result that more refined stratification is better with respect to different criteria. The emphasis is on criteria related to stochastic orders. For example, rather than compare estimators of the integral of $f$ by their variances (for unbiased estimators), or mean square error, we attempt the stronger comparison of convex order when possible. For the supremum, the criterion is based on the stochastic order of estimators.
  • We study a class of optimal allocation problems, including the well-known Bomber Problem, with the following common probabilistic structure. An aircraft equipped with an amount~$x$ of ammunition is intercepted by enemy airplanes arriving according to a homogenous Poisson process over a fixed time duration~$t$. Upon encountering an enemy, the aircraft has the choice of spending any amount~$0\le y\le x$ of its ammunition, resulting in the aircraft's survival with probability equal to some known increasing function of $y$. Two different goals have been considered in the literature concerning the optimal amount~$K(x,t)$ of ammunition spent: (i)~Maximizing the probability of surviving for time~$t$, which is the so-called Bomber Problem, and (ii) maximizing the number of enemy airplanes shot down during time~$t$, which we call the Fighter Problem. Several authors have attempted to settle the following conjectures about the monotonicity of $K(x,t)$: [A] $K(x,t)$ is decreasing in $t$, [B] $K(x,t)$ is increasing in $x$, and [C] the amount~$x-K(x,t)$ held back is increasing in $x$. [A] and [C] have been shown for the Bomber Problem with discrete ammunition, while [B] is still an open question. In this paper we consider both time and ammunition continuous, and for the Bomber Problem prove [A] and [C], while for the Fighter we prove [A] and [C] for one special case and [B] and [C] for another. These proofs involve showing that the optimal survival probability and optimal number shot down are totally positive of order 2 ($\mbox{TP}_2$) in the Bomber and Fighter Problems, respectively. The $\mbox{TP}_2$ property is shown by constructing convergent sequences of approximating functions through an iterative operation which preserves $\mbox{TP}_2$ and other properties.