• We confirm 66 low-mass stellar and brown dwarf systems (K7-M9) plus 19 visual or spectroscopic companions of the beta Pictoris Moving Group (BPMG). Of these, 41 are new discoveries, increasing the known low-mass members by 45%. We also add four objects to the 14 known with masses predicted to be less than 0.07 Msun. Our efficient photometric+kinematic selection process identified 104 low-mass candidates which we observed with ground-based spectroscopy. We collected infrared observations of the latest spectral types (>M5) to search for low gravity objects. These and all <M5 candidates were observed with high-resolution optical spectrographs to measure the radial velocities and youth indicators, such as lithium absorption and H-alpha emission, needed to confirm BPMG membership, achieving a 63% confirmation rate. We also compiled the most complete census of the BPMG membership with which we tested the efficiency and false-membership assignments using our selection and confirmation criteria. We assess a group age of 22 +/- 6 Myr using the new census, consistent with past estimates. With the now densely sampled lithium depletion boundary, we resolve the broadening of the boundary by either an age spread or astrophysical influences on lithium burning rates. We find that 69% of the now known members with AFGKM primaries are M stars, nearing the expected value of 75%. However, the new IMF for the BPMG shows a deficit of 0.2-0.3 Msun stars by a factor of approximately 2. We expect that the AFGK census of the BPMG is also incomplete, probably due to biases of searches towards the nearest stars.
  • The detectability of planetesimal impacts on imaged exoplanets can be measured using Jupiter during the 1994 comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 events as a proxy. By integrating the whole planet flux with and without impact spots, the effect of the impacts at wavelengths from 2 - 4 microns is revealed. Jupiter's reflected light spectrum in the near-infrared is dominated by its methane opacity including a deep band at 2.3 microns. After the impact, sunlight that would have normally been absorbed by the large amount of methane in Jupiter's atmosphere was instead reflected by the cometary material from the impacts. As a result, at 2.3 microns, where the planet would normally have low reflectivity, it brightened substantially and stayed brighter for at least a month.
  • We present optical and near-infrared adaptive optics (AO) imaging and spectroscopy of 13 ultracool (>M6) companions to late-type stars (K7-M4.5), most of which have recently been identified as candidate members of nearby young moving groups (YMGs; 8-120 Myr) in the literature. The inferred masses of the companions (~10-100 Mjup) are highly sensitive to the ages of the primary stars so we critically examine the kinematic and spectroscopic properties of each system to distinguish bona fide YMG members from old field interlopers. 2MASS J02155892-0929121 C is a new M7 substellar companion (40-60 Mjup) with clear spectroscopic signs of low gravity and hence youth. The primary, possibly a member of the ~40 Myr Tuc-Hor moving group, is visually resolved into three components, making it a young low-mass quadruple system in a compact (<100 AU) configuration. In addition, Li 1 $\lambda$6708 absorption in the intermediate-gravity M7.5 companion 2MASS J15594729+4403595 B provides unambiguous evidence that it is young (<200 Myr) and resides below the hydrogen burning limit. Three new close-separation (<1") companions (2MASS J06475229-2523304 B, PYC J11519+0731 B, and GJ 4378 Ab) orbit stars previously reported as candidate YMG members, but instead are likely old (>1 Gyr) tidally-locked spectroscopic binaries without convincing kinematic associations with any known moving group. The high rate of false positives in the form of old active stars with YMG-like kinematics underscores the importance of radial velocity and parallax measurements to validate candidate young stars identified via proper motion and activity selection alone. Finally, we spectroscopically confirm the cool temperature and substellar nature of HD 23514 B, a recently discovered M8 benchmark brown dwarf orbiting the dustiest-known member of the Pleiades. [Abridged]