• We propose a novel ultrafast electronic switching device based on dual-graphene electron waveguides, in analogy to the optical dual-channel waveguide device. The design utilizes the principle of coherent quantum mechanical tunneling of Rabi oscillations between the two graphene electron waveguides. Based on a modified coupled mode theory, we construct a theoretical model to analyse the device characteristics, and predict that the swtiching speed is faster than 1 ps. Due to the long mean free path of electrons in graphene at room temperature, the proposed design avoids the limitation of low temperature operation required in the normal semiconductor quantum-well structure. The layout of the our design is similar to that of a standard CMOS transistor that should be readily fabricated with current state-of-art nanotechnology.
  • In this paper, we utilize coupled mode theory (CMT) to model the coupling between surface plasmon-polaritons (SPPs) between multiple graphene sheets. By using the Stimulated Raman Adiabatic Passage (STIRAP) Quantum Control Technique, we propose a novel directional coupler based on SPPs evolution in three layers of graphene sheets in some curved configuration. Our calculated results show that the SPP can be transferred efficiently from the input graphene sheet to the output graphene sheet, and the coupling is also robust that it is not sensitive to the length of the device.
  • In this paper we carry out a theoretical and experimental study of the nature of graphene/semiconductor Schottky contact. We present a simple and parameter-free carrier transport model of graphene/semiconductor Schottky contact derived from quantum statistical theory, which is validated by the quantum Landauer theory and first-principle calculations. The proposed model can well explain experimental results for samples of different types of graphene/semiconductor Schottky contact.
  • In this paper, we propose van del Waals heterostructure-based thermionic devices for the applications in cooling and power generation in the temperature range of 300 to 400 K. By using two-dimensional materials of low cross-plane thermal conductivity as the barrier materials and graphene as electrodes, our calculation demonstrates that our proposed device will have a higher efficiency as compared to other methods such as thermoelectric device and the traditional thermionic devices. By using the parameters within the current technology, we predict a cooling capability at more than 50$\%$ of the Carnot efficiency, and a 10 to 20 $\%$ efficiency in harvesting the wasted heat at 400 K.
  • Inelastic electron tunneling provides a low-energy pathway for the excitation of surface plasmons and light emission. We theoretically investigate tunnel junctions based on metals and graphene. We show that graphene is potentially a highly efficient material for tunneling excitation of plasmons because of its narrow plasmon linewidths, strong emission, and large tunability in the midinfrared wavelength regime. Compared to gold and silver, the enhancement can be up to 10 times for similar wavelengths and up to 5 orders at their respective plasmon operating wavelengths. Tunneling excitation of graphene plasmons promises an efficient technology for on-chip electrical generation and manipulation of plasmons for graphene-based optoelectronics and nanophotonic integrated circuits.
  • Graphene has recently been shown to possess giant nonlinearity; however, the utility of this nonlinearity is limited due to high losses and small interaction volume. We show that by performing waveguide engineering to graphene's nonlinearity, we are able to dramatically increase the nonlinear parameter and decrease the switching optical power to sub-watt levels. Our design makes use of the hybrid plasmonic waveguide and careful manipulation of graphene's refractive index by tuning its Fermi level. The ability to tailor the nonlinear parameter in graphene based waveguides via the Fermi level provides a paradigm of nonlinear optics devices to be realized.
  • The versatile control of graphene's plasmonic modes via an external gate-voltage inspires us to design efficient electro-optical graphene plasmonic logic gates at the midinfrared wavelengths. We show that these devices are superior to the conventional optical logic gates because the former possess cut-off states and interferometric effects. Moreover, the designed six basic logic gates (i.e., NOR/AND, NAND/OR, XNOR/XOR) achieved not only ultracompact size lengths of less than {\lambda}/28 with respect to the operating wavelength of 10 {\mu}m, but also a minimum extinction ratio as high as 15 dB. These graphene plasmonic logic gates are potential building blocks for future nanoscale midinfrared photonic integrated circuits.
  • A novel plasmonic waveguide-coupled nanocavity with a monopole antenna is proposed to localize the optical power from a hybrid plasmonic waveguide and subsequently convert it into electrical current. The nanocavity is designed as a Fabry-P\'erot waveguide resonator, while the monopole antenna is made of a metallic nanorod directly mounted onto the metallic part of the waveguide terminal which acts as the conducting ground. The nanocavity coincides with the antenna feed sandwiched in between the antenna and the ground. Maximum power from the waveguide can be coupled into, and absorbed in the nanocavity by means of the field resonance in the antenna as well as in the nanocavity. Simulation results show that 42% optical power from the waveguide can be absorbed in a germanium filled nanocavity with a nanoscale volume of 220x150x60nm$^3$. The design may find applications in nanoscale photo-detection, subwavelength light focusing and manipulating, as well as sensing.
  • Subwavelength modulators play an indispensable role in integrated photonic-electronic circuits. Due to weak light-matter interactions, it is always a challenge to develop a modulator with a nanometer scale footprint, low switching energy, low insertion loss and large modulation depth. In this paper, we propose the design of a vanadium dioxide dual-mode plasmonic waveguide electroabsorption modulator using a metal-insulator-VO$_2$-insulator-metal (MIVIM) waveguide platform. By varying the index of vanadium dioxide, the modulator can route plasmonic waves through the low-loss dielectric insulator layer during the "on" state and high-loss VO$_2$ layer during the "off" state, thereby significantly reducing the insertion loss while maintaining a large modulation depth. This ultracompact waveguide modulator, for example, can achieve a large modulation depth of ~10dB with an active size of only 200x50x220nm$^3$ (or ~{\lambda}$^3$/1700), requiring a drive-voltage of ~4.6V. This high performance plasmonic modulator could potentially be one of the keys towards fully-integrated plasmonic nanocircuits in the next-generation chip technology.
  • Doped graphene emerges as a strong contender for active plasmonic material in the mid-infrared wavelengths due to the versatile external-control of its permittivity-function and also its highly-compressed graphene surface plasmon (GSP) wavelength. In this paper, we design active plasmonic waveguide devices based on electrical-modulation of doped graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) on a voltage-gated inhomogeneous dielectric layer. We first develop figure-of-merit (FoM) formulae to characterize the performance of passive and active graphene nanoribbon waveguides. Based on the FoMs, we choose optimal GNRs to build a plasmonic shutter, which consists of a GNR placed on top of an inhomogeneous SiO$_2$ substrate supported by a Si nanopillar. Simulation studies show that for a simple 50nm-long plasmonic shutter, the modulation contrast can exceed 30dB. The plasmonic shutter is further extended to build a 4-port active power splitter and an 8-port active network, both based on GNR cross-junction waveguides. For the active power splitter, the GSP power transmission at each waveguide arm can be independently controlled by an applied gate-voltage with high modulation contrast and nearly-equal power-splitting proportions. From the construct of the 8-port active network, we see that it is possible to scale up the GNR cross-junction waveguides into large and complex active waveguide networks, showing great potential in an exciting new area of mid-infrared graphene plasmonic integrated nanocircuits.
  • A plasmonic coupled-cavity system, which consists of a quarter-wave coupler cavity, a resonant Fabry-Perot detector nanocavity, and an off-resonant reflector cavity, is used to enhance the localization of surface plasmons in a plasmonic detector. The coupler cavity is designed based on transmission line theory and wavelength scaling rules in the optical regime, while the reflector cavity is derived from off-resonant resonator structures to attenuate transmission of plasmonic waves. We observed strong coupling of the cavities in simulation results, with an 86% improvement of surface plasmon localization achieved. The plasmonic coupled-cavity system may find useful applications in areas of nanoscale photodetectors, sensors, and an assortment of plasmonic-circuit devices.