• Low radio frequency surveys are important for testing unified models of radio-loud quasars and radio galaxies. Intrinsically similar sources that are randomly oriented on the sky will have different projected linear sizes. Measuring the projected linear sizes of these sources provides an indication of their orientation. Steep-spectrum isotropic radio emission allows for orientation-free sample selection at low radio frequencies. We use a new radio survey of the Bo\"otes field at 150 MHz made with the Low Frequency Array (LOFAR) to select a sample of radio sources. We identify 44 radio galaxies and 16 quasars with powers $P>10^{25.5}$ W Hz$^{-1}$ at 150 MHz using cross-matched multi-wavelength information from the AGN and Galaxy Evolution Survey (AGES), which provides spectroscopic redshifts. We find that LOFAR-detected radio sources with steep spectra have projected linear sizes that are on average 4.4$\pm$1.4 larger than those with flat spectra. The projected linear sizes of radio galaxies are on average 3.1$\pm$1.0 larger than those of quasars (2.0$\pm$0.3 after correcting for redshift evolution). Combining these results with three previous surveys, we find that the projected linear sizes of radio galaxies and quasars depend on redshift but not on power. The projected linear size ratio does not correlate with either parameter. The LOFAR data is consistent within the uncertainties with theoretical predictions of the correlation between the quasar fraction and linear size ratio, based on an orientation-based unification scheme.
  • The correlation between radio spectral index and redshift has been exploited to discover high redshift radio galaxies, but its underlying cause is unclear. It is crucial to characterise the particle acceleration and loss mechanisms in high redshift radio galaxies to understand why their radio spectral indices are steeper than their local counterparts. Low frequency information on scales of $\sim$1 arcsec are necessary to determine the internal spectral index variation. In this paper we present the first spatially resolved studies at frequencies below 100 MHz of the $z = 2.4$ radio galaxy 4C 43.15 which was selected based on its ultra-steep spectral index ($\alpha < -1$; $S_{\nu} \sim \nu^{\alpha}$ ) between 365 MHz and 1.4 GHz. Using the International Low Frequency Array (LOFAR) Low Band Antenna we achieve sub-arcsecond imaging resolution at 55 MHz with VLBI techniques. Our study reveals low-frequency radio emission extended along the jet axis, which connects the two lobes. The integrated spectral index for frequencies $<$ 500 MHz is -0.83. The lobes have integrated spectral indices of -1.31$\pm$0.03 and -1.75$\pm$0.01 for frequencies $\geq$1.4 GHz, implying a break frequency between 500 MHz and 1.4 GHz. These spectral properties are similar to those of local radio galaxies. We conclude that the initially measured ultra-steep spectral index is due to a combination of the steepening spectrum at high frequencies with a break at intermediate frequencies.
  • Carbon radio recombination lines (RRLs) at low frequencies (<=500 MHz) trace the cold, diffuse phase of the interstellar medium, which is otherwise difficult to observe. We present the detection of carbon RRLs in absorption in M82 with LOFAR in the frequency range of 48-64 MHz. This is the first extragalactic detection of RRLs from a species other than hydrogen, and below 1 GHz. Since the carbon RRLs are not detected individually, we cross-correlated the observed spectrum with a template spectrum of carbon RRLs to determine a radial velocity of 219 +- 9 km/s . Using this radial velocity, we stack 22 carbon-{\alpha} transitions from quantum levels n = 468-508 to achieve an 8.5 sigma detection. The absorption line profile exhibits a narrow feature with peak optical depth of 0.003 and FWHM of 31 km/s. Closer inspection suggests that the narrow feature is superimposed on a broad, shallow component. The total line profile appears to be correlated with the 21 cm H I line profile reconstructed from H I absorption in the direction of supernova remnants in the nucleus. The narrow width and centroid velocity of the feature suggests that it is associated with the nuclear starburst region. It is therefore likely that the carbon RRLs are associated with cold atomic gas in the direction of the nucleus of M82.
  • Comparison of observations of radio recombination lines in the interstellar medium with theoretical models can be used to constrain electron temperature and density of the gas. An important component of the models is spontaneous transition rates between bound levels. Calculating these rates relies on accurate bound-bound oscillator strengths, which can be cast in terms of the Gaunt factor. The Gaunt factor contains terminating hypergeometric functions that cannot be calculated with sufficient accuracy for high quantum levels ($n \gtrsim 50$) by standard machine-precision methods. Methods to overcome the accuracy problem have been developed, which include asymptotic expansions and recursion relations. These methods, used in astrophysical models to calculate oscillator strengths, can introduce errors, sometimes up to as much as $\sim 8$ per cent. Detections of radio recombination lines with the new Low Frequency Array (LOFAR) has prompted an examination of theoretical models of the interstellar medium. We revisit the calculation of the Gaunt factor, employing modern arbitrary-precision computational methods to tabulate the Gaunt factor for transitions up to quantum level $n=2000$, sufficient to model low frequency Carbon radio recombination lines. The calculations provide a relative error of $\sim3\times 10^{-4}$ when compared to more detailed calculations including relativistic corrections. Our values for the Gaunt factor are provided for download in a tabular format to be used for a wide range of applications.
  • There is growing evidence of a higher intrinsic fraction of broad absorption line quasars (BALQSOs) than that obtained in optical surveys, on which most previous X-ray studies of BALQSOs have focused. Here we present Chandra observations of 18 BALQSOs at $z\sim2$, selected from a near-infrared (2MASS) sample, where the BALQSO fraction is likely to be close to the intrinsic fraction. We measure photon indices using the stacked spectra of the optically-faint ($i-K_s\geq 2.3$ mag) and optically-bright ($i-K_s < 2.3$ mag) samples to be $\Gamma \simeq 1.5$--$2.1$. We constrain their intrinsic column density by modelling the X-ray fractional hardness ratio, finding a mean column density of $3.5\times10^{22}$ \cmsq\ assuming neutral absorption. We incorporate SDSS optical measurements (rest frame UV) to study the broadband spectral index between the X-ray and UV bands, and compare this to a large sample of normal quasars. We estimate that the optically-faint BALQSOs are X-ray weaker than the optically-bright ones, and the entire sample of BALQSOs are intrinsically X-ray weak when compared to normal AGN. Correcting for magnification of X-ray emission via gravitational lensing by the central black hole viewed at large inclination angles makes these BALQSOs even more intrinsically X-ray weak. Finally, we estimate AGN kinetic feedback efficiencies of a few percent for an X-ray wind of $0.3c$ in high-ionization BALQSOs. Combined with energy carried by low-ionization BALQSOs and UV winds, the total kinetic energy in BALQSOs can be sufficient to provide AGN kinetic feedback required to explain the co-evolution between black holes and host galaxies.
  • We present Suzaku observations of three iron low-ionization broad absorption line quasars (FeLoBALs). We detect J1723+5553 (3\sigma) in the observed 2--10 keV band, and constrain its intrinsic nh column density to nh > 6\times10^{23} \cmsq by modeling its X-ray hardness ratio. We study the broadband spectral index, aox, between the X-ray and UV bands by combining the X-ray measurements and the UV flux extrapolated from 2MASS magnitudes, assuming a range of intrinsic column densities, and then comparing the aox values for the three FeLoBALs with those from a large sample of normal quasars. We find that the FeLoBALs are consistent with the spectral energy distribution (SED) of normal quasars if the intrinsic nh column densities are nh > 7\times10^{23} \cmsq for J0943+5417, nh > 2\times10^{24} \cmsq for J1352+4293, and 6\times10^{23} < \nh < 3\times10^{24} \cmsq for J1723+5553. At these large intrinsic column densities, the optical depth from Thomson scattering can reach \sim6, which will significantly modulate the UV flux. Our results suggest that the X-ray absorbing material is located at a different place from the UV absorbing wind, likely between the X-ray and UV emitting regions. We find a significant kinetic feedback efficiency for FeLoBALs, indicating that the outflows are an important feedback mechanism in quasars.