• We present a microscopic model for collective effects in high multiplicity proton--proton collisions, where multiple partonic subcollisions give rise to a dense system of strings. From lattice calculations we know that QCD strings are transversely extended, and we argue that this should result in a transverse pressure and expansion, similar to the flow in a deconfined plasma. The model is implemented in the PYTHIA8 Monte Carlo event generator, and we find that it can qualitatively reproduce the long range azimuthal correlations forming a near-side ridge in high multiplicity proton--proton events at LHC energies.
  • By measuring the substructure of a jet, one can assign it a "quark" or "gluon" tag. In the eikonal (double-logarithmic) limit, quark/gluon discrimination is determined solely by the color factor of the initiating parton (C_F versus C_A). In this paper, we confront the challenges faced when going beyond this leading-order understanding, using both parton-shower generators and first-principles calculations to assess the impact of higher-order perturbative and nonperturbative physics. Working in the idealized context of electron-positron collisions, where one can define a proxy for quark and gluon jets based on the Lorentz structure of the production vertex, we find a fascinating interplay between perturbative shower effects and nonperturbative hadronization effects. Turning to proton-proton collisions, we highlight a core set of measurements that would constrain current uncertainties in quark/gluon tagging and improve the overall modeling of jets at the Large Hadron Collider.
  • An extension of the rope hadronization model, which has previously provided good descriptions of hadrochemistry in high multiplicity pp collisions, is presented. The extension includes a dynamically generated transverse pressure, produced by the excess energy from overlapping strings. We find that this model can qualitatively reproduce soft features of Quark Gluon Plasma in small systems, such as higher $\langle p_\perp \rangle$ for heavier particles and long range azimuthal correlations forming a ridge. The effects are similar to those obtained from a hydrodynamic expansion, but without assuming a thermalized medium.
  • We present a scheme for the generation of central exclusive final states in the Pythia 8 program. The implementation allows for the investigation of higher order corrections to such exclusive processes as approximated by the initial-state parton shower in Pythia 8. To achieve this, the spin and colour decomposition of the initial-state shower has been worked out, in order to determine the probability that a partonic state generated from an inclusive sub-process followed by a series of initial-state parton splittings can be considered as an approximation of an exclusive colour- and spin-singlet process. We use our implementation to investigate effects of parton showers on some examples of central exclusive processes, and find sizeable effects on di-jet production, while the effects on e.g. central exclusive Higgs production are minor.
  • We review the state-of-the-art of Glauber-inspired models for estimating the distribution of the number of participating nucleons in pA and AA collisions. We argue that there is room for improvement in these models when it comes to the treatment of diffractive excitation processes, and present a new simple Glauber-like model where these processes are better taken into account. We also suggest a new way of using the number of participating, or wounded, nucleons to extrapolate event characteristics from pp collisions, and hence get an estimate of basic hadronic final-state properties in pA collisions, which may be used to extract possible nuclear effects. The new method is inspired by the Fritiof model, but based on the full, semi-hard multiparton interaction model of Pythia 8.
  • In order to understand the initial partonic state in proton-nucleus and electron-nucleus collisions, we investigate the total, inelastic, and (quasi-)elastic cross sections in pA and gamma-A collisions, as these observables are insensitive to possible collective effects in the final state interactions. We used as a tool the DIPSY dipole model, which is based on BFKL dynamics including non-leading effects, saturation, and colour interference, which we have extended to describe collisions of protons and virtual photons with nuclei. We present results for collisions with O, Cu, and Pb nuclei, and reproduce preliminary data on the pPb inelastic cross section at LHC by CMS and LHCb. The large NN cross section results in pA scattering that scales approximately with the area. The results are compared with conventional Glauber model calculations, and we note that the more subtle dynamical effects are more easily studied in the ratios between the total, inelastic and (quasi-)elastic cross sections. The smaller photon interaction makes the gamma-A collisions more closely proportional to A, and we see here that future electron-ion colliders would be valuable complements to the pA collisions in studies of dynamical effects from correlations, coherence and fluctuations in the initial state in high energy nuclear collisions.
  • In models for hadron collisions based on string hadronization, the strings are usually treated as independent, allowing no interaction between the confined colour fields. In studies of nucleus collisions it has been suggested that strings close in space can fuse to form "colour ropes". Such ropes are expected to give more strange particles and baryons, which also has been suggested as a signal for plasma formation. Overlapping strings can also be expected in pp collisions, where usually no phase transition is expected. In particular at the high LHC energies the expected density of strings is quite high. To investigate possible effects of rope formation, we present a model in which strings are allowed to combine into higher multiplets, giving rise to increased production of baryons and strangeness, or recombine into singlet structures and vanish. Also a crude model for strings recombining into junction structures is considered, again giving rise to increased baryon production. The models are implemented in the DIPSY MC event generator, using PYTHIA 8 for hadronization, and comparison to pp minimum bias data, reveals improvement in the description of identified particle spectra.
  • This is the manual and user guide for the Rivet system for the validation and tuning of Monte Carlo event generators for high energy physics. As well as the core Rivet library, this manual describes the usage of the rivet program and the AGILe generator interface library. The depth and level of description is chosen for users of the system, starting with the basics of using validation code written by others, and then covering sufficient details to write new Rivet analyses and calculational components.
  • We discuss extensions the CKKW-L and UMEPS tree-level matrix element and parton shower merging approaches to next-to-leading order accuracy. The generalisation of CKKW-L is based on the NL3 scheme previously developed for e+e- -annihilation, which is extended to also handle hadronic collisions by a careful treatment of parton densities. NL3 is further augmented to allow for more readily accessible NLO input. To allow for a more careful handling of merging scale dependencies we introduce an extension of the UMEPS method. This approach, dubbed UNLOPS, does not inherit problematic features of CKKW-L, and thus allows for a theoretically more appealing definition of NLO merging. We have implemented both schemes in Pythia8, and present results for the merging of W- and Higgs-production events, where the zero- and one-jet contribution are corrected to next-to-leading order simultaneously, and higher jet multiplicities are described by tree-level matrix elements. The implementation of the procedure is completely general and can be used for higher jet multiplicities and other processes, subject to the availability of programs able to correctly generate the corresponding partonic states to leading and next-to-leading order accuracy.
  • We revisit the CKKW-L method for merging tree-level matrix elements with parton showers, and amend it with an add/subtract scheme to minimise dependencies on the merging scale. The scheme is constructed to, as far as possible, recover the unitary nature of the underlying parton shower, so that the inclusive cross section is retained for each jet multiplicity separately.
  • The Sudakov veto algorithm for generating emission and no-emission probabilities in parton showers is revisited and some reweighting techniques are suggested to improve statistics by oversampling in specific cases.
  • In this paper we describe a formalism for generating exclusive final states in diffractive excitation, based on the optical analogy where diffraction is fully determined by the absorption into inelastic channels. The formalism is based on the Good--Walker formalism for diffractive excitation, and it is assumed that the virtual parton cascades represent the diffractive eigenstates defined by a definite absorption amplitude. We emphasize that, although diffractive excitation is basically a quantum-mechanical phenomenon with strong interference effects, it is possible to calculate the different interfering components to the amplitude in an event generator, add them and thus calculate the reaction cross section for exclusive diffractive final states. The formalism is implemented in the DIPSY event generator, introducing no tunable parameters beyond what has been determined previously in studies of non-diffractive events. Some early results from DIS and proton-proton collisions are presented, and compared to experimental data.
  • We present an implementation of the so-called CKKW-L merging scheme for combining multi-jet tree-level matrix elements with parton showers. The implementation uses the transverse-momentum-ordered shower with interleaved multiple interactions as implemented in PYTHIA8. We validate our procedure using e+e--annihilation into jets and vector boson production in hadronic collisions, with special attention to details in the algorithm which are formally sub-leading in character, but may have visible effects in some observables. We find substantial merging scale dependencies induced by the enforced rapidity ordering in the default PYTHIA8 shower. If this rapidity ordering is removed the merging scale dependence is almost negligible. We then also find that the shower does a surprisingly good job of describing the hardness of multi-jet events, as long as the hardest couple of jets are given by the matrix elements. The effects of using interleaved multiple interactions as compared to more simplistic ways of adding underlying-event effects in vector boson production are shown to be negligible except in a few sensitive observables. To illustrate the generality of our implementation, we also give some example results from di-boson production and pure QCD jet production in hadronic collisions.
  • We present a new model for simulating exclusive final states in minimum-bias collisions between hadrons. In a series of papers we have developed a Monte Carlo model based on Mueller's dipole picture of BFKL-evolution, supplemented with non-leading corrections, which has shown to be very successful in describing inclusive and semi-inclusive observables in hadron collisions. In this paper we present a further extension of this model to also describe exclusive final states. This is a highly non-trivial extension, and we have encountered many details that influence the description, and for which no guidance from perturbative QCD could be found. Hence we have had to make many choices based on semi-classical and phenomenological arguments. The end result is a new event generator called DIPSY which can be used to simulate complete minimum-bias non-diffractive hadronic collision events. Although the description of data from the Tevatron and LHC is not quite as good as for PYTHIA, the most advanced of the general purpose event generator programs for these processes, our results are clearly competitive, and can be expected to improve with careful tuning. In addition, as our model is very different from conventional multiple scattering scenaria, the DIPSY program can be used to gain deeper insight in the soft and semi-hard processes involved both in hadronic and heavy ion collisions.
  • We present a method to match the multi-parton states generated by the High Energy Jets Monte Carlo with parton showers generated by the Ariadne program using the colour dipole model. The High Energy Jets program already includes a full resummation of soft divergences. Hence, in the matching it is important that the corresponding divergences in the parton shower are subtracted, keeping only the collinear parts. We present a novel, shower-independent method for achieving this, enabling us to generate fully exclusive and hadronized events with multiple hard jets, in hadronic collisions. We discuss in detail the arising description of the soft, collinear and hard regions by examples in pure QCD jet-production.
  • We present a dynamical study of the double parton distribution in impact parameter space, which enters into the double scattering cross section in hadronic collisions. This distribution is analogous to the generalized parton densities in momentum space. We use the Lund Dipole Cascade model, presented in earlier articles, which is based on BFKL evolution including essential higher order corrections and saturation effects. As result we find large correlation effects, which break the factorization of the double scattering process. At small transverse separation we see the development of "hot spots", which become stronger with increasing Q^2. At smaller x-values the distribution widens, consistent with the shrinking of the diffractive peak in elastic scattering. The dependence on Q^2 is, however, significantly stronger than the dependence on x, which has implications for extrapolations to LHC, e.g. for results for underlying events associated with the production of new heavy particles.
  • We review the physics basis, main features and use of general-purpose Monte Carlo event generators for the simulation of proton-proton collisions at the Large Hadron Collider. Topics included are: the generation of hard-scattering matrix elements for processes of interest, at both leading and next-to-leading QCD perturbative order; their matching to approximate treatments of higher orders based on the showering approximation; the parton and dipole shower formulations; parton distribution functions for event generators; non-perturbative aspects such as soft QCD collisions, the underlying event and diffractive processes; the string and cluster models for hadron formation; the treatment of hadron and tau decays; the inclusion of QED radiation and beyond-Standard-Model processes. We describe the principal features of the ARIADNE, Herwig++, PYTHIA 8 and SHERPA generators, together with the Rivet and Professor validation and tuning tools, and discuss the physics philosophy behind the proper use of these generators and tools. This review is aimed at phenomenologists wishing to understand better how parton-level predictions are translated into hadron-level events as well as experimentalists wanting a deeper insight into the tools available for signal and background simulation at the LHC.
  • We extend earlier schemes for merging tree-level matrix elements with parton showers to include also merging with one-loop matrix elements. In this paper we make a first study on how to include one-loop corrections, not only for events with a given jet multiplicity, but simultaneously for several different jet multiplicities. Results are presented for the simplest non-trivial case of hadronic events at LEP as a proof-of-concept.
  • More than 100 people participated in a discussion session at the DIS08 workshop on the topic What HERA may provide. A summary of the discussion with a structured outlook and list of desirable measurements and theory calculations is given.
  • We have in earlier papers presented an extension of Mueller's dipole cascade model, which includes sub-leading effects from energy conservation and running coupling as well as colour suppressed saturation effects from pomeron loops via a ``dipole swing''. The model was applied to describe the total and diffractive cross sections in $pp$ and $\gamma^*p$ collisions, and also the elastic cross section in $pp$ scattering. In this paper we extend the model to describe the corresponding quasi-elastic cross sections in $\gamma^*p$, namely the exclusive production of vector mesons and deeply virtual compton scattering. Also for these reactions we find a good agrement with measured cross sections. In addition we obtain a reasonable description of the $t$-dependence of the elastic $pp$ and quasi-elastic $\gamma^\star p$ cross sections.
  • We make a thorough comparison between different schemes of merging fixed-order tree-level matrix element generators with parton-shower models. We use the most basic benchmark of the O(alpha_S) correction to e+e- -> jets, where the simple kinematics allows us to study in detail the transition between the matrix-element and parton-shower regions. We find that the CKKW-based schemes give a reasonably smooth transition between these regions, although problems may occur if the parton shower used is not ordered in transverse momentum. However, the so-called Pseudo-Shower and MLM schemes turn out to have potentially serious problems due to different scale definitions in different regions of phase space, and due to sensitivity to the details in the initial conditions of the parton shower programs used.
  • We have in earlier papers presented an extension of Mueller's dipole cascade model, which includes subleading effects from energy conservation and running coupling as well as colour suppressed effects from pomeron loops via a ``dipole swing''. The model was applied to describe the total cross sections in pp and gamma*p collisions. In this paper we present a number of improvements of the model, in particular related to the confinement mechanism. A consistent treatment of dipole evolution and dipole--dipole interactions is achieved by replacing the infinite range Coulomb potential by a screened potential, which further improves the frame-independence of the model. We then apply the model to elastic scattering and diffractive excitation, where we specifically study the effects of different sources for fluctuations. In our formalism we can take into account contributions from all different sources, from the dipole cascade evolution, the dipole--dipole scattering, from the impact-parameter dependence, and from the initial photon and proton wavefunctions. Good agreement is obtained with data from the Tevatron and from HERA, and we also present some predictions for the LHC.
  • We investigate some recent measurements of Fermi--Dirac correlations by the LEP collaborations indicating surprisingly small source radii for the production of baryons in $e^+e^-$-annihilation at the $Z^0$ peak. In the hadronization models there are besides the Fermi--Dirac correlation effect also a strong dynamical (anti-)correlation. We demonstrate that the extraction of the pure FD effect is highly dependent on a realistic Monte Carlo event generator, both for separation of those dynamical correlations which are not related to Fermi--Dirac statistics, and for corrections of the data and background subtractions. Although the model can be tuned to well reproduce single particle distributions, there are large model-uncertainties when it comes to correlations between identical baryons. We therefore, unfortunately, have to conclude that it is at present not possible to make any firm conclusion about the source radii relevant for baryon production at LEP.
  • We present a method to include colour-suppressed effects in the Mueller dipole picture. The model consistently includes saturation effects both in the evolution of dipoles and in the interactions of dipoles with a target in a frame-independent way. When implemented in a Monte Carlo simulation together with our previous model of energy--momentum conservation and a simple dipole description of initial state protons and virtual photons, the model is able to reproduce to a satisfactory degree both the gamma*-p cross sections as measured at HERA as well as the total p-p cross section all the way from ISR energies to the Tevatron and beyond.
  • We use the results from a recent investigation of hard parton-parton gravitational scattering in the ADD scenario to make semi-quantitative predictions for a few standard high-ET jet observables at the LHC. By implementing these gravitational scattering results in the Pythia event generator and combining it with the Charybdis generator for black holes, we investigate the effects of large extra dimensions and find that, depending on the width of the brane, the relative importance of gravitational scattering and black hole production may change significantly. For the cases where gravitational scatterings are important we discuss how to distinguish gravitational scattering from standard QCD partonic scatterings. In particular we point out that the universal colorlessness of elastic gravitational scattering implies fewer particles between the hard jets, and that this can be used in order to distinguish an increased jet activity induced by gravitational scattering from an increased jet activity induced by eg. super-symmetric extensions where the interaction is colorful.