• The asymptotic derivation of a new family of one-dimensional, weakly nonlinear and weakly dispersive equations that model the flow of an ideal fluid in an elastic vessel is presented. Dissipative effects due to the viscous nature of the fluid are also taken into account. The new models validate by asymptotic reasoning other non-dispersive systems of equations that are commonly used, and improve other nonlinear and dispersive mathematical models derived to describe the blood flow in elastic vessels. The new systems are studied analytically in terms of their basic characteristic properties such as the linear dispersion characteristics, symmetries, conservation laws and solitary waves. Unidirectional model equations are also derived and analysed in the case of vessels of constant radius. The capacity of the models to be used in practical problems is being demonstrated by employing a particular system with favourable properties to study the blood flow in a large artery. Two different cases are considered: A vessel with constant radius and a tapered vessel. Significant changes in the flow can be observed in the case of the tapered vessel.
  • Photonic-based qubits and integrated photonic circuits have enabled demonstrations of quantum information processing (QIP) that promises to transform the way in which we compute and communicate. To that end, sources of polarization-entangled photon pair states are an important enabling technology, especially for polarization-based protocols. However, such states are difficult to prepare in an integrated photonic circuit. Scalable semiconductor sources typically rely on nonlinear optical effects where polarization mode dispersion (PMD) degrades entanglement. Here, we directly generate polarization-entangled states in an AlGaAs waveguide, aided by the PMD and without any compensation steps. We perform quantum state tomography and report a raw concurrence as high as 0.91$\pm$0.01 observed in the 1100-nm-wide waveguide. The scheme allows direct Bell state generation with an observed maximum fidelity of 0.90$\pm$0.01 from the 800-nm-wide waveguide. Our demonstration paves the way for sources that allow for the implementation of polarization-encoded protocols in large-scale quantum photonic circuits.
  • We demonstrate a source of correlated photon pairs which will have applications in future integrated quantum photonic circuits. The source utilizes spontaneous four-wave mixing (SFWM) in a dispersion-engineered nanowaveguide made of AlGaAs, which has merits of negligible two-photon absorption and low spontaneous Raman scattering (SpRS). We observe a coincidence-to-accidental (CAR) ratio up to 177, mainly limited by propagation losses. Experimental results agree well with theoretical predictions of the SFWM photon pair generation and the SpRS noise photon generation. We also study the effects from the SpRS, propagation losses, and waveguide lengths on the quality of our source.
  • Measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution (MDI-QKD), which is immune to all detector side-channel attacks, is the most promising solution to the security issues in practical quantum key distribution systems. Though several experimental demonstrations of MDI QKD have been reported, they all make one crucial but not yet verified assumption, that is there are no flaws in state preparation. Such an assumption is unrealistic and security loopholes remain in the source. Here we present, to our knowledge, the first MDI-QKD experiment with state preparation flaws taken into consideration. By applying a novel security proof by Tamaki \textit{et al} (Phys. Rev. A 90, 052314 (2014)), we distribute secure keys over fiber links up to 40 km with imperfect sources, which would not have been possible under previous security proofs. By closing loopholes in both the sources and the detectors, our work shows the feasibility of secure QKD with practical imperfect devices.
  • We demonstrate that, with a fair comparison, the secret key rate of discrete-variable measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution (DV-MDI-QKD) with high-efficiency single-photon detectors and good system alignment is typically rather high and thus highly suitable for not only long distance communication but also metropolitan networks. The previous reservation on the key rate and suitability of DV-MDI-QKD for metropolitan networks expressed by Pirandola et al. [Nature Photon. 9, 397 (2015)] was based on an unfair comparison with low-efficiency detectors and high quantum bit error rate, and is, in our opinion, unjustified.
  • Decoy-state quantum key distribution (QKD) is a standard technique in current quantum cryptographic implementations. Unfortunately, existing experiments have two important drawbacks: the state preparation is assumed to be perfect without errors and the employed security proofs do not fully consider the finite-key effects for general attacks. These two drawbacks mean that existing experiments are not guaranteed to be secure in practice. Here, we perform an experiment that for the first time shows secure QKD with imperfect state preparations over long distances and achieves rigorous finite-key security bounds for decoy-state QKD against coherent attacks in the universally composable framework. We quantify the source flaws experimentally and demonstrate a QKD implementation that is tolerant to channel loss despite the source flaws. Our implementation considers more real-world problems than most previous experiments and our theory can be applied to general QKD systems. These features constitute a step towards secure QKD with imperfect devices.
  • We demonstrate experimentally the frequency time entanglement of photon pairs produced in a CW pumped quasi phased matched AlGaAs superlattice waveguide. A visibility of 96.0+-0.7% without background subtraction has been achieved, which corresponds the violation of Bell inequality by 52 standard deviations.
  • Along with the rapid development of digital library, digital library of the third generation, taking the main characteristics of the personalized service, has already become the mainstream today. This article first analyzes the concept and characteristics of digital library, then elaborates the inevitability of personalized service as well as the necessity of its development and based on the Propose of establishing interested knowledge-base, enumerates several ways of personalized service, at last according to individualized service, this paper proposes the model of "learningoriented individual digital library" and prospects the trends of digital library.
  • We demonstrate the first implementation of polarization encoding measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution (MDI-QKD), which is immune to all detector side-channel attacks. Active phase randomization of each individual pulse is implemented to protect against attacks on imperfect sources. By optimizing the parameters in the decoy state protocol, we show that it is feasible to implement polarization encoding MDI-QKD over large optical fiber distances. A 1600-bit secure key is generated between two parties separated by 10 km of telecom fibers. Our work suggests the possibility of building a MDI-QKD network, in which complicated and expensive detection system is placed in a central node and users connected to it can perform confidential communication by preparing polarization qubits with compact and low-cost equipment. Since MDI-QKD is highly compatible with the quantum network, our work brings the realization of quantum internet one step closer.
  • We report on the demonstration of correlated photon pair generation in quasi-phase-matched superlattice AlGaAs waveguides with a high coincidence-to-accidental ratio (CAR); with a continuous (CW) pump, the observed CAR (>100) is more than two order of magnitudes improvement over previously reported spontaneous down conversion (SPDC) schemes in AlGaAs waveguides with a pulsed pump.
  • In this paper, we study the feasibility of conducting quantum key distribution (QKD) together with classical communication through the same optical fiber by employing dense-wavelength-division-multiplexing (DWDM) technology at telecom wavelength. The impact of the classical channels to the quantum channel has been investigated for both QKD based on single photon detection and QKD based on homodyne detection. Our studies show that the latter can tolerate a much higher level of contamination from the classical channels than the former. This is because the local oscillator used in the homodyne detector acts as a "mode selector" which can suppress noise photons effectively. We have performed simulations based on both the decoy BB84 QKD protocol and the Gaussian modulated coherent state (GMCS) QKD protocol. While the former cannot tolerate even one classical channel (with a power of 0dBm), the latter can be multiplexed with 38 classical channels (0dBm power each channel) and still has a secure distance around 10km. Preliminary experiment has been conducted based on a 100MHz bandwidth homodyne detector.
  • We discuss excess noise contributions of a practical balanced homodyne detector in Gaussian-modulated coherent-state (GMCS) quantum key distribution (QKD). We point out the key generated from the original realistic model of GMCS QKD may not be secure. In our refined realistic model, we take into account excess noise due to the finite bandwidth of the homodyne detector and the fluctuation of the local oscillator. A high speed balanced homodyne detector suitable for GMCS QKD in the telecommunication wavelength region is built and experimentally tested. The 3dB bandwidth of the balanced homodyne detector is found to be 104MHz and its electronic noise level is 13dB below the shot noise at a local oscillator level of 8.5*10^8 photon per pulse. The secure key rate of a GMCS QKD experiment with this homodyne detector is expected to reach Mbits/s over a few kilometers.
  • We present the fundamental principles behind quantum key distribution and discuss a few well-known QKD protocols. Bearing in mind that the majority of our readers are from engineering and experimental optics, we focus more on the experimental implementation of various QKD protocols rather than security analysis. Another important topic that is covered here is the study of the security of practical QKD systems.
  • We present a passive approach to the security analysis of quantum key distribution (QKD) with an untrusted source. A complete proof of its unconditional security is also presented. This scheme has significant advantages in real-life implementations as it does not require fast optical switching or a quantum random number generator. The essential idea is to use a beam splitter to split each input pulse. We show that we can characterize the source using a cross-estimate technique without active routing of each pulse. We have derived analytical expressions for the passive estimation scheme. Moreover, using simulations, we have considered four real-life imperfections: Additional loss introduced by the "plug & play" structure, inefficiency of the intensity monitor, noise of the intensity monitor, and statistical fluctuation introduced by finite data size. Our simulation results show that the passive estimate of an untrusted source remains useful in practice, despite these four imperfections. Also, we have performed preliminary experiments, confirming the utility of our proposal in real-life applications. Our proposal makes it possible to implement the "plug & play" QKD with the security guaranteed, while keeping the implementation practical.
  • We present a high speed random number generation scheme based on measuring the quantum phase noise of a single mode diode laser operating at a low intensity level near the lasing threshold. A delayed self-heterodyning system has been developed to measure the random phase fluctuation.By actively stabilizing the phase of the fiber interferometer, a random number generation rate of 500Mbit/s has been demonstrated and the generated random numbers have passed all the DIEHARD tests.
  • In this paper, we present a fully fiber-based one-way Quantum Key Distribution (QKD) system implementing the Gaussian-Modulated Coherent States (GMCS) protocol. The system employs a double Mach-Zehnder Interferometer (MZI) configuration in which the weak quantum signal and the strong Local Oscillator (LO) go through the same fiber between Alice and Bob, and are separated into two paths inside Bob's terminal. To suppress the LO leakage into the signal path, which is an important contribution to the excess noise, we implemented a novel scheme combining polarization and frequency multiplexing, achieving an extinction ratio of 70dB. To further minimize the system excess noise due to phase drift of the double MZI, we propose that, instead of employing phase feedback control, one simply let Alice remap her data by performing a rotation operation. We further present noise analysis both theoretically and experimentally. Our calculation shows that the combined polarization and frequency multiplexing scheme can achieve better stability in practice than the time-multiplexing scheme, because it allows one to use matched fiber lengths for the signal and the LO paths on both sides of the double MZI, greatly reducing the phase instability caused by unmatched fiber lengths. Our experimental noise analysis quantifies the three main contributions to the excess noise, which will be instructive to future studies of the GMCS QKD systems. Finally, we demonstrate, under the "realistic model" in which Eve cannot control the system within Bob's terminal, a secure key rate of 0.3bit/pulse over a 5km fiber link. This key rate is about two orders of magnitude higher than that of a practical BB84 QKD system.
  • This paper has been withdrawn
  • To improve the performance of a quantum key distribution (QKD) system, high speed, low dark count single photon detectors (or low noise homodyne detectors) are required. However, in practice, a fast detector is usually noisy. Here, we propose a "dual detectors" method to improve the performance of a practical QKD system with realistic detectors: the legitimate receiver randomly uses either a fast (but noisy) detector or a quiet (but slow) detector to measure the incoming quantum signals. The measurement results from the quiet detector can be used to bound eavesdropper's information, while the measurement results from the fast detector are used to generate secure key. We apply this idea to various QKD protocols. Simulation results demonstrate significant improvements in both BB84 protocol with ideal single photon source and Gaussian-modulated coherent states (GMCS) protocol; while for decoy-state BB84 protocol with weak coherent source, the improvement is moderate. We also discuss various practical issues in implementing the "dual detectors" scheme.
  • Decoy state quantum key distribution (QKD) has been proposed as a novel approach to improve dramatically both the security and the performance of practical QKD set-ups. Recently, many theoretical efforts have been made on this topic and have theoretically predicted the high performance of decoy method. However, the gap between theory and experiment remains open. In this paper, we report the first experiments on decoy state QKD, thus bridging the gap. Two protocols of decoy state QKD are implemented: one-decoy protocol over 15km of standard telecom fiber, and weak+vacuum protocol over 60km of standard telecom fiber. We implemented the decoy state method on a modified commercial QKD system. The modification we made is simply adding commercial acousto-optic modulator (AOM) on the QKD system. The AOM is used to modulate the intensity of each signal individually, thus implementing the decoy state method. As an important part of implementation, numerical simulation of our set-up is also performed. The simulation shows that standard security proofs give a zero key generation rate at the distance we perform decoy state QKD (both 15km and 60km). Therefore decoy state QKD is necessary for long distance secure communication. Our implementation shows explicitly the power and feasibility of decoy method, and brings it to our real-life.
  • We propose and experimentally demonstrate a single-mode fiber length and dispersion measurement system based on a novel frequency-shifted asymmetric Sagnac interferometer incorporating an acousto-optic modulator (AOM). By sweeping the driving frequency of the AOM, which is asymmetrically placed in the Sagnac loop, the optical length of the fiber can be determined by measuring the corresponding variation in the phase delay between the two counter-propagating light beams. Combined with a high-resolution data processing algorithm, this system yields a dynamic range from a few centimeters to 60km (limited only by our availability of long fibers) with a resolution about 1ppm for long fibers.
  • We present a design for a quantum key distribution(QKD) system in a Sagnac loop configuration, employing a novel phase modulation scheme based on frequency shift, and demonstrate stable BB84 QKD operation with high interference visibility and low quantum bit error rate (QBER). The phase modulation is achieved by sending two light pulses with a fixed time delay (or a fixed optical path delay) through a frequency shift element and by modulating the amount of frequency shift. The relative phase between two light pulses upon leaving the frequency-shift element is determined by both the time delay (or the optical path delay) and the frequency shift, and can therefore be controlled by varying the amount of frequency shift. To demonstrate its operation, we used an acousto-optic modulator (AOM) as the frequency-shift element, and vary the driving frequency of the AOM to encode phase information.The interference visibility for a 40km and a 10km fiber loop is 96% and 99%, respectively, at single photon level. We ran BB84 protocol in a 40-km Sagnac loop setup continuously for one hour and the measured QBER remained within the 2%~5% range. A further advantage of our scheme is that both phase and amplitude modulation can be achieved simultaneously by frequency and amplitude modulation of the AOM's driving signal, allowing our QKD system the capability of implementing other protocols, such as the decoy-state QKD and the continuous- variable QKD. We also briefly discuss a new type of Eavesdropping strategy ("phaseremapping" attack) in bidirectional QKD system.