• Applying survival function analysis to the planet orbital period (P) and semi-major axis (a) distribution from the Kepler sample, we find that all exoplanets are uniformly distributed in (ln a) or (ln P), with an average inner cut-off of 0.05 AU to the host star. More specifically, this inner cut-off is 0.04 AU for rocky worlds (1-2 Earth radii) and 0.08 AU for water worlds (2-4 Earth radii). Moreover, the transitional planets (4-10 Earth radii) and gas giants (>10 Earth radii) have a change of slope of survival function at 0.4 AU from -1 to -1/2, suggesting a different statistical distribution uniform in \Sqrt[a] inside 0.4 AU, compared to small exoplanets (<4 Earth radii). This difference in distribution is likely caused by the difference in planet migration mechanism, and susceptibility to host stellar irradiation, for gas-poor (<4 Earth radii) versus gas-rich (>4 Earth radii) planets. Armed with this knowledge and combined with the survival function analysis of planet size distribution, we can make precise estimates of planet occurrence rate and predict the TESS mission yield.
  • Applying the survival function analysis to the planet radius distribution of the Kepler exoplanet candidates, we have identified two natural divisions of planet radius at 4 Earth radii and 10 Earth radii. These divisions place constraints on planet formation and interior structure model. The division at 4 Earth radii separates small exoplanets from large exoplanets above. When combined with the recently-discovered radius gap at 2 Earth radii, it supports the treatment of planets 2-4 Earth radii as a separate group, likely water worlds. Thus, for planets around solar-type FGK main-sequence stars, we argue that 2 Earth radii is the separation between water-poor and water-rich planets, and 4 Earth radii is the separation between gas-poor and gas-rich planets. We confirm that the slope of survival function in between 4 and 10 Earth radii to be shallower compared to either ends, indicating a relative paucity of planets in between 4-10 Earth radii, namely, the sub-Saturnian desert there. We name them transitional planets, as they form a bridge between the gas-poor small planets and gas giants. Accordingly, we propose the following classification scheme: (<2 Earth radii) rocky planets, (2-4 Earth radii) water worlds, (4-10 Earth radii) transitional planets, and (>10 Earth radii) gas giants.
  • Tumor cells acquire different genetic alterations during the course of evolution in cancer patients. As a result of competition and selection, only a few subgroups of cells with distinct genotypes survive. These subgroups of cells are often referred to as subclones. In recent years, many statistical and computational methods have been developed to identify tumor subclones, leading to biologically significant discoveries and shedding light on tumor progression, metastasis, drug resistance and other processes. However, most existing methods are either not able to infer the phylogenetic structure among subclones, or not able to incorporate copy number variations (CNV). In this article, we propose SIFA (tumor Subclone Identification by Feature Allocation), a Bayesian model which takes into account both CNV and tumor phylogeny structure to infer tumor subclones. We compare the performance of SIFA with two other commonly used methods using simulation studies with varying sequencing depth, evolutionary tree size, and tree complexity. SIFA consistently yields better results in terms of Rand Index and cellularity estimation accuracy. The usefulness of SIFA is also demonstrated through its application to whole genome sequencing (WGS) samples from four patients in a breast cancer study.
  • The analysis of cancer genomic data has long suffered "the curse of dimensionality". Sample sizes for most cancer genomic studies are a few hundreds at most while there are tens of thousands of genomic features studied. Various methods have been proposed to leverage prior biological knowledge, such as pathways, to more effectively analyze cancer genomic data. Most of the methods focus on testing marginal significance of the associations between pathways and clinical phenotypes. They can identify relevant pathways, but do not involve predictive modeling. In this article, we propose a Pathway-based Kernel Boosting (PKB) method for integrating gene pathway information for sample classification, where we use kernel functions calculated from each pathway as base learners and learn the weights through iterative optimization of the classification loss function. We apply PKB and several competing methods to three cancer studies with pathological and clinical information, including tumor grade, stage, tumor sites, and metastasis status. Our results show that PKB outperforms other methods, and identifies pathways relevant to the outcome variables.
  • This work aims at exploring the scaling relations among rocky exoplanets. With the assumption of internal gravity increasing linearly in the core, and staying constant in the mantle, and tested against numerical simulations, a simple model is constructed, applicable to rocky exoplanets of core mass fraction (CMF) $\in 0.1\sim0.4$ and mass $\in 0.1 \sim 10 M_{\oplus}$. Various scaling relations are derived: (1) core radius fraction $\rm CRF \approx \sqrt{CMF}$, (2) Typical interior pressure $P_{\text{typical}} \sim g_{\rm{s}}^2$ (surface gravity squared), (3) core formation energy $E_{\rm diff} \sim \frac{1}{10} E_{\rm grav}$ (the total gravitational energy), (4) effective heat capacity of the mantle $C_{\rm p}\approx \left( \frac{M_{\rm{p}}}{M_{\oplus}} \right) \cdot 7 \cdot 10^{27}$ J K$^{-1}$, and (5) the moment of inertia $I\approx \frac{1}{3} \cdot M_{\rm{p}} \cdot R_{\rm{p}}^2$. These scaling relations, though approximate, are handy for quick use owing to their simplicity and lucidity, and provide insights into the interior structures of rocky exoplanets. As examples, this model is applied to several planets including Earth, GJ 1132b, Kepler-93b, and Kepler-20b, and made comparison with the numerical method.
  • HD 179070, aka Kepler-21, is a V = 8.25 F6IV star and the brightest exoplanet host discovered by Kepler. An early detailed analysis by Howell et al. (2012) of the first thirteen months (Q0 - Q5) of Kepler light curves revealed transits of a planetary companion, Kepler-21b, with a radius of about 1.60 +/- 0.04 R_earth and an orbital period of about 2.7857 days. However, they could not determine the mass of the planet from the initial radial velocity observations with Keck-HIRES, and were only able to impose a 2-sigma upper limit of 10 M_earth. Here we present results from the analysis of 82 new radial velocity observations of this system obtained with HARPS-N, together with the existing 14 HIRES data points. We detect the Doppler signal of Kepler-21b with a radial velocity semi-amplitude K = 2.00 +/- 0.65 m/s, which corresponds to a planetary mass of 5.1 +/- 1.7 M_earth. We also measure an improved radius for the planet of 1.639 (+0.019, -0.015) R_earth, in agreement with the radius reported by Howell et al. (2012). We conclude that Kepler-21b, with a density of 6.4 +/- 2.1 g/cm^3, belongs to the population of terrestrial planets with iron, magnesium silicate interiors, which have lost the majority of their envelope volatiles via stellar winds or gravitational escape. The radial velocity analysis presented in this paper serves as example of the type of analysis that will be necessary to confirm the masses of TESS small planet candidates.
  • In the past few years, the number of confirmed planets has grown above 2000. It is clear that they represent a diversity of structures not seen in our own solar system. In addition to very detailed interior modeling, it is valuable to have a simple analytical framework for describing planetary structures. Variational principle is a fundamental principle in physics, entailing that a physical system follows the trajectory which minimizes its action. It is alternative to the differential equation formulation of a physical system. Applying this principle to planetary interior can beautifully summarize the set of differential equations into one, which provides us some insight into the problem. From it, a universal mass-radius relation, an estimate of error propagation from equation of state to mass-radius relation, and a form of virial theorem applicable to planetary interiors are derived.
  • Several small dense exoplanets are now known, inviting comparisons to Earth and Venus. Such comparisons require translating their masses and sizes to composition models of evolved multi-layer-interior planets. Such theoretical models rely on our understanding of the Earth's interior, as well as independently derived equations of state (EOS), but have so far not involved direct extrapolations from Earth's seismic model -PREM. In order to facilitate more detailed compositional comparisons between small exoplanets and the Earth, we derive here a semi-empirical mass-radius relation for two-layer rocky planets based on PREM: ${\frac{R}{R_\oplus}} = (1.07-0.21\cdot \text{CMF})\cdot (\frac{M}{M_\oplus})^{1/3.7}$, where CMF stands for Core Mass Fraction. It is applicable to 1$\sim$8 M$_{\oplus}$ and CMF of 0.0$\sim$0.4. Applying this formula to Earth and Venus and several known small exoplanets with radii and masses measured to better than $\sim$30\% precision gives a CMF fit of $0.26\pm0.07$.
  • Respondent-driven sampling (RDS) is a link-tracing procedure for surveying hidden or hard-to-reach populations in which subjects recruit other subjects via their social network. There is significant research interest in detecting clustering or dependence of epidemiological traits in networks, but researchers disagree about whether data from RDS studies can reveal it. Two distinct mechanisms account for dependence in traits of recruiters and recruitees in an RDS study: homophily, the tendency for individuals to share social ties with others exhibiting similar characteristics, and preferential recruitment, in which recruiters do not recruit uniformly at random from their available alters. The different effects of network homophily and preferential recruitment in RDS studies have been a source of confusion in methodological research on RDS, and in empirical studies of the social context of health risk in hidden populations. In this paper, we give rigorous definitions of homophily and preferential recruitment and show that neither can be measured precisely in general RDS studies. We derive nonparametric identification regions for homophily and preferential recruitment and show that these parameters are not point identified unless the network takes a degenerate form. The results indicate that claims of homophily or recruitment bias measured from empirical RDS studies may not be credible. We apply our identification results to a study involving both a network census and RDS on a population of injection drug users in Hartford, CT.
  • We report the first planet discovery from the two-wheeled Kepler (K2) mission: HIP 116454 b. The host star HIP 116454 is a bright (V = 10.1, K = 8.0) K1-dwarf with high proper motion, and a parallax-based distance of 55.2 +/- 5.4 pc. Based on high-resolution optical spectroscopy, we find that the host star is metal-poor with [Fe/H] = -.16 +/- .18, and has a radius R = 0.716 +/- .0024 R_sun and mass M = .775 +/- .027 Msun. The star was observed by the Kepler spacecraft during its Two-Wheeled Concept Engineering Test in February 2014. During the 9 days of observations, K2 observed a single transit event. Using a new K2 photometric analysis technique we are able to correct small telescope drifts and recover the observed transit at high confidence, corresponding to a planetary radius of Rp = 2.53 +/- 0.18 Rearth. Radial velocity observations with the HARPS-N spectrograph reveal a 11.82 +/- 1.33 Mearth planet in a 9.1 day orbit, consistent with the transit depth, duration, and ephemeris. Follow-up photometric measurements from the MOST satellite confirm the transit observed in the K2 photometry and provide a refined ephemeris, making HIP 116454 b amenable for future follow-up observations of this latest addition to the growing population of transiting super-Earths around nearby, bright stars.
  • Recently, an image encryption algorithm based on scrambling and Vegin`ere cipher has been proposed. However, it was soon cryptanalyzed by Zhang et al. using a combination of chosen-plaintext attack and differential attack. This paper briefly reviews the two attack methods proposed by Zhang et al. and outlines the mathematical interpretations of them. Based on their work, we present an improved chosen-plaintext attack to further reduce the number of chosen-plaintexts required, which is proved to be optimal. Moreover, it is found that an elaborately designed known-plaintex attack can efficiently compromise the image cipher under study. This finding is verified by both mathematical analysis and numerical simulations. The cryptanalyzing techniques described in this paper may provide some insights for designing secure and efficient multimedia ciphers.
  • We present the characterization of the Kepler-93 exoplanetary system, based on three years of photometry gathered by the Kepler spacecraft. The duration and cadence of the Kepler observations, in tandem with the brightness of the star, enable unusually precise constraints on both the planet and its host. We conduct an asteroseismic analysis of the Kepler photometry and conclude that the star has an average density of 1.652+/-0.006 g/cm^3. Its mass of 0.911+/-0.033 M_Sun renders it one of the lowest-mass subjects of asteroseismic study. An analysis of the transit signature produced by the planet Kepler-93b, which appears with a period of 4.72673978+/-9.7x10^-7 days, returns a consistent but less precise measurement of the stellar density, 1.72+0.02-0.28 g/cm^3. The agreement of these two values lends credence to the planetary interpretation of the transit signal. The achromatic transit depth, as compared between Kepler and the Spitzer Space Telescope, supports the same conclusion. We observed seven transits of Kepler-93b with Spitzer, three of which we conducted in a new observing mode. The pointing strategy we employed to gather this subset of observations halved our uncertainty on the transit radius ratio R_p/R_star. We find, after folding together the stellar radius measurement of 0.919+/-0.011 R_Sun with the transit depth, a best-fit value for the planetary radius of 1.481+/-0.019 R_Earth. The uncertainty of 120 km on our measurement of the planet's size currently renders it one of the most precisely measured planetary radii outside of the Solar System. Together with the radius, the planetary mass of 3.8+/-1.5 M_Earth corresponds to a rocky density of 6.3+/-2.6 g/cm^3. After applying a prior on the plausible maximum densities of similarly-sized worlds between 1--1.5 R_Earth, we find that Kepler-93b possesses an average density within this group.
  • For most planets in the range of radii from 1 to 4 R$_{\oplus}$, water is a major component of the interior composition. At high pressure H${}_{2}$O can be solid, but for larger planets, like Neptune, the temperature can be too high for this. Mass and age play a role in determining the transition between solid and fluid (and mixed) water-rich super-Earth. We use the latest high-pressure and ultra-high-pressure phase diagrams of H${}_{2}$O, and by comparing them with the interior adiabats of various planet models, the temperature evolution of the planet interior is shown, especially for the state of H${}_{2}$O. It turns out that the bulk of H${}_{2}$O in a planet's interior may exist in various states such as plasma, superionic, ionic, Ice VII, Ice X, etc., depending on the size, age and cooling rate of the planet. Different regions of the mass-radius phase space are also identified to correspond to different planet structures. In general, super-Earth-size planets (isolated or without significant parent star irradiation effects) older than about 3 Gyr would be mostly solid.
  • The prospects for finding transiting exoplanets in the range of a few to 20 Earth masses is growing rapidly with both ground-based and spaced-based efforts. We describe a publicly available computer code to compute and quantify the compositional ambiguities for differentiated solid exoplanets with a measured mass and radius, including the mass and radius uncertainties.
  • The magnetic and electrical transport properties of Mn-doped amorphous silicon (\textit{a-}Mn$_{x}$Si$_{1-x}$) thin films have been measured. The magnetic susceptibility obeys the Curie-Weiss law for a wide range of $x$ (0.005-0.175) and the saturation moment is small. While all Mn atoms contribute to the electrical transport, only a small fraction (interstitial Mn$^{2+}$ states with $J$=$S$=5/2) contribute to the magnetization. The majority of the Mn atoms do not possess any magnetic moment, contrary to what is predicted by the Ludwig-Woodbury model for Mn in crystalline silicon. Unlike \textit{a-}Gd$_{x}$Si$_{1-x}$ films which have an enormous \textit{negative} magnetoresistance, \textit{a-}Mn$_{x}$Si$_{1-x}$ films have only a small \textit{positive} magnetoresistance, which can be understood by this quenching of the Mn moment.