• 4U0114$+$65 is one of the slowest known X-ray pulsars. We present an analysis of a pointed observation by the XMM-Newton X-ray telescope. The energy-resolved light curve, the time-resolved X-ray spectra provided by the EPIC cameras on board and the first high-resolution spectrum of this source, provided by the Reflection Grating Spectrometer, were analysed. An X-ray pulse of $9350\pm 160$ s was measured, confirming the secular spin up of this source. We also fit the pulse-phase-resolved spectra with Comptonisation models. These models imply a very small ($r\sim 3$ km) and hot ($kT\sim 2-3$ keV) emitting region and therefore point to a hot spot over the neutron star (NS) surface as the most reliable explanation for the X-ray pulse. The long NS spin period, the spin-up rate, and persistent X-ray emission can be explained within the theory of quasi-spherical settling accretion, which may indicate that the magnetic field is in the magnetar range. Thus, 4U 0114$+$65 could be a wind-accreting magnetar. We also observed two episodes of low luminosity. The first can be explained as an absorption by an over-dense structure in the wind of the donor. The second episode may be due to temporal cessation of accretion onto one magnetic pole caused by non-spherical matter capture from the structured stellar wind. The light curve displays two types of dips seen during the high-flux intervals. The short dips, with durations of tens of seconds, are produced through absorption by wind clumps. The long dips might be associated with the rarefied interclump medium. We also found evidence of emission lines in the X-ray photoionised wind of the B1Ia donor. The Fe K$\alpha$ line is highly variable and much weaker than in other X-ray binaries with supergiant donors. The degree of wind clumping, measured through the covering fraction, is much lower than in supergiant donor stars with earlier spectral types.
  • We report on both high-precision photometry from the MOST space telescope and ground-based spectroscopy of the triple system delta Ori A consisting of a binary O9.5II+early-B (Aa1 and Aa2) with P = 5.7d, and a more distant tertiary (O9 IV P > 400 yrs). This data was collected in concert with X-ray spectroscopy from the Chandra X-ray Observatory. Thanks to continuous coverage for 3 weeks, the MOST light curve reveals clear eclipses between Aa1 and Aa2 for the first time in non-phased data. From the spectroscopy we have a well constrained radial velocity curve of Aa1. While we are unable to recover radial velocity variations of the secondary star, we are able to constrain several fundamental parameters of this system and determine an approximate mass of the primary using apsidal motion. We also detected second order modulations at 12 separate frequencies with spacings indicative of tidally influenced oscillations. These spacings have never been seen in a massive binary, making this system one of only a handful of such binaries which show evidence for tidally induced pulsations.
  • We have developed lists of likely B3--A0 stars (called "late B" stars) in the young cluster Trumpler 16. The following criteria were used: location within 3' of Eta Car, an appropriate V and B-V combination, and proper motion (where available). Color and magnitude cuts have been made assuming an E(B-V) =0.55 mag +/- 0.1, which is a good approximation close to the center of Trumpler 16. These lists have been cross-correlated with X-ray sources found in the Chandra Carina Complex Project (CCCP). Previous studies have shown that only very rarely (if at all) do late main sequence B stars produce X-rays. We present evidence that the X-ray detected sources are binaries with low-mass companions, since stars less massive than 1.4 Msun are strong X-ray sources at the age of the cluster. Both the median X-ray energies and X-ray luminosities of these sources are in good agreement with values for typical low-mass coronal X-ray sources. We find that 39% of the late B stars based on a list with proper motions have low-mass companions. Similarly, 32% of a sample without proper motions have low-mass companions. We discuss the X-ray detection completeness. These results on low-mass companions of intermediate mass stars are complementary to spectroscopic and interferometric results, and probe new parameter space of low mass companions at all separations. They do not support a steeply rising distribution of mass ratios to low masses for intermediate-mass (5 Msun) primaries, such as would be found by random pairing from the Initial Mass Function.
  • We discuss X-ray line formation in dense O star winds. A random distribution of wind shocks is assumed to emit X-rays that are partially absorbed by cooler wind gas. The cool gas resides in highly compressed fragments oriented perpendicular to the radial flow direction. For fully opaque fragments, we find that the blueshifted part of X-ray line profiles remains flat-topped even after severe wind attenuation, whereas the red part shows a steep decline. These box-type, blueshifted profiles resemble recent Chandra observations of the O3 star zeta Pup. For partially transparent fragments, the emission lines become similar to those from a homogeneous wind.